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191 - 200 of 222 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

PSYCH 7N: Learn to Intervene, Wisely

Do you ever look around and see ways that the world could be a better place, especially if people behaved a little differently? Do you wonder what prevents better outcomes? nnIn this seminar, we will examine social-psychological processes that lie behind diverse social problems, especially how people make sense of themselves, other people, or important situations, sometimes in pejorative ways that undermine outcomes. Then we will examine interventions that address critical processes to promote human flourishing. You'll have the opportunity to read and discuss classic and contemporary 'wise' psychological interventions such as: how a change in the sign on a hospital soap dispenser can increase soap use; how a change in survey items can raise voter turnout; how a change in a single question can improve dating relationships; and how reading-and-writing exercises that address students' beliefs about intelligence and belonging in school can improve achievement years into the future. In lear more »
Do you ever look around and see ways that the world could be a better place, especially if people behaved a little differently? Do you wonder what prevents better outcomes? nnIn this seminar, we will examine social-psychological processes that lie behind diverse social problems, especially how people make sense of themselves, other people, or important situations, sometimes in pejorative ways that undermine outcomes. Then we will examine interventions that address critical processes to promote human flourishing. You'll have the opportunity to read and discuss classic and contemporary 'wise' psychological interventions such as: how a change in the sign on a hospital soap dispenser can increase soap use; how a change in survey items can raise voter turnout; how a change in a single question can improve dating relationships; and how reading-and-writing exercises that address students' beliefs about intelligence and belonging in school can improve achievement years into the future. In learning about this research, you will discover more about psychological processes, how basic research helps clarify these processes, how they contribute in complex field settings to social problems, and how they can be altered.nnAs you learn from past research, you'll have the opportunity to design your very own 'wise intervention' and to workshop others' efforts. You will identify a social problem on campus of interest to you, say: How can you reduce waste in the cafeteria? How can you get more people to take the stairs? How can you get people to hold more inclusive attitudes? Then you will identify a psychological process you think contributes to this problem, implement an intervention in the field and track the results. nnWhen you have completed this seminar, you will more fully understand the psychological aspect of social problems and how this can be addressed through rigorous research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Walton, G. (PI)

PSYCH 150B: RACE AND CRIME PRACTICUM (CSRE 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in Psych 150: Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students will participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. nnPrerequisite: Psych 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 155: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 118: Disasters, Decisions, Development in Sustainable Urban Systems (ESS 118, ESS 218, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, GS 118, GS 218, POLISCI 224A)

CEE 224X of the CEE 224XYZ SUS Project series is joining forces with D3: Disasters, Decisions, Development to offer D3+SUS, which will connect principles of sustainable urban systems with the challenge of increasing resilience in the San Francisco Bay Area. The project-based learning course is designed to align with the Resilient By Design | Bay Area Challenge ( http://www.resilientbayarea.org/); students will learn the basic concepts of resilience and tools of risk analysis while applying those mindsets and toolsets to a collective research product delivered to the RBD community. Students who take D3+SUS are encouraged to continue on to CEE 224Y and CEE 224Z, in which teams will be paired with local partners and will develop interventions to improve the resilience of local communities. For more information, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 147: Ending Poverty with Technology (SOC 157)

There are growing worries that new technologies may eliminate work, increase inequality, and create a large dependent class subsisting on transfers. But can technology instead be turned against itself and used to end poverty? This class explores the sources of domestic poverty and then examines how new technologies might be developed to eliminate poverty completely. We first survey existing poverty-reducing products and then attempt to imagine new products that might end poverty by equalizing access to information, reducing transaction costs, or equalizing access to training. In a follow-up class in the spring quarter, students who choose to continue will select the most promising ideas, continue to develop them, and begin the design task within Stanford¿s new Poverty and Technology Lab.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Grusky, D. (PI)

PUBLPOL 148: Ending Poverty with Technology: A Practicum. (SOC 158)

Will robots, automation, and technology eliminate work and create a large poverty-sticken dependent class? Or will they eliminate poverty, free us from the tyranny of work, and usher in a new society defined by leisure and creative pursuits? This two-quarter class is dedicated to exploring new theories about poverty while at the same time incubating applied technology solutions. The first quarter is devoted to examining the theory of technology-based solutions to poverty, and the second quarter is devoted to planning a viable technology-based product that will reduce poverty. This product may then be built in a follow-up Using Tech for Good (Computer Science 50) class in the first quarter of 2018 (but class participants are not required to take that follow-up class). The course is premised on the view that innovative solutions to poverty will be based on new conversations and an authentic collaboration between Silicon Valley and leaders from education, government, and low-income communities
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Grusky, D. (PI)

PUBLPOL 178: The Science and Practice of Effective Advocacy (CSRE 178P, URBANST 178)

How can purposeful collective action change government policy, business practices and cultural norms? This course will teach students about the components of successful change campaigns and help develop the practical skills to carry out such efforts. The concepts taught will be relevant to both issue advocacy and electoral campaigns, and be evidence-based, drawing on lessons from social psychology, political science, communications, community organizing and social movements. The course will meet twice-a-week for 90 minutes, and class time will combine engaged learning exercises, discussions and lectures. There will be a midterm and final. Students will be able to take the course for 3 or 5 units. Students who take the course for 5 units will participate in an advocacy project with an outside organization during the quarter, attend a related section meeting and write reflections. If you enroll in the course for 5 units, you also need to enroll in the section attached to your catalog number ( URBANST 178-Section 02 or PUBLPOL 178 Section 2 or CSRE 178P Section 2.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 200A: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

PUBLPOL 200B: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hehmeyer, P. (PI)

PUBLPOL 200C: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ajami, N. (PI)
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