2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

171 - 180 of 253 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

LAW 806F: Policy Practicum: Accountability for the Unintended Consequences of Impact Investing

As the impact investing industry grows exponentially into trillions of dollars, investors, scholars, and industry leaders are increasingly focused on improving metrics and standards. They recognize the need to define impact, critically evaluate philanthropic trade-offs, and apply due diligence standards to evaluate social and environmental risk. Despite this trend, however, no accountability framework exists to manage the potential for harm to people and the environment from impact investing. To ensure that impact investing lives up to its name, a system is needed that holds investors accountable for harm to local communities and their environments. Other traditional development finance institutions -- such as OPIC or the World Bank's IFC -- have been routinely applying policy and accountability frameworks for decades to manage their social and environmental risks and to remedy harm. When these institutions invest in a project, they bring environmental and human rights standards and ci more »
As the impact investing industry grows exponentially into trillions of dollars, investors, scholars, and industry leaders are increasingly focused on improving metrics and standards. They recognize the need to define impact, critically evaluate philanthropic trade-offs, and apply due diligence standards to evaluate social and environmental risk. Despite this trend, however, no accountability framework exists to manage the potential for harm to people and the environment from impact investing. To ensure that impact investing lives up to its name, a system is needed that holds investors accountable for harm to local communities and their environments. Other traditional development finance institutions -- such as OPIC or the World Bank's IFC -- have been routinely applying policy and accountability frameworks for decades to manage their social and environmental risks and to remedy harm. When these institutions invest in a project, they bring environmental and human rights standards and citizen-driven complaint systems that local communities can use to address a grievance. If an impact investor (e.g. a private foundation, individual investor, or private bank¿s impact fund) is funding that same project without traditional development institutions involved, chances are there is no way that communities can have their voices heard or receive remedy for harm. Yet the failure to take seriously the risks of social and environmental harm can lead to catastrophic financial, human, and environmental outcomes. In "Accountability: The Golden Opportunity in Impact Investing" https://ssir.org/articles/entry/accountability_the_golden_opportunity_in_impact_investing , Natalie Bridgeman Fields describes Accountability Counsel cases in Liberia and Mexico that demonstrate not only the importance of community-driven accountability but also concrete examples of an accountability framework. This project develops a system that enables impact project asset owners access to information about their asset's compliance, evaluation tools, and grievance systems. The practicum team will work closely with Accountability Counsel staff to develop an accountability and learning system for impact investment that guarantees that assets: (1) comply with policies to protect people and the environment, (2) have evaluation tools that assess their impact, and (3) offer grievance methods to address social or environmental harms associated when they do occur. The potential positive impact for impact investing grounded in an accountability framework is staggering. According to a recent report from Morgan Stanley, ¿sustainable investment¿ has grown more than 33 percent over the last two years to $9 trillion, and will only continue to grow as impact investing becomes more accessible. If impact investing scales further without governance and accountability structures in place to prevent abuse and address harm, the consequences to local communities are dire. They will be certain to include the land grabs, contamination of water, labor rights abuses, and displacement of indigenous people that are typical of investments where there is weak rule of law and use of land and labor. Benefits of creating a robust accountability framework, if achieved, could spread beyond impact investing and could extend across global finance, including development finance, where existing frameworks could be improved based on leadership from the impact investing community. The practicum seeks interdisciplinary graduate students from law, international development, economics, project finance, impact investing, international human rights law, policy advocacy, business, and/or philanthropy. The research team will collaboratively produce a report for a sustained advocacy campaign with lessons and practices for accountability within impact investing. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Final Paper. NOTES: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 806G: Policy Practicum: UNCITRAL Transparency Registry

As the core legal body of the United Nations system in the field of international trade law, the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) has developed procedural rules to promote transparency and public accessibility to treaty-based investor-state arbitration. In contrast to traditional closed proceedings, the new Rules on Transparency take into account both the public interest and the interest of the parties to resolve arbitration disputes in a fair and efficient manner. Focusing on the 2014 UN Convention on Transparency in Treaty-based Investor-State Arbitration, students will review UNCITRAL Working Group III documents to identify issues of concern and benefit for individual countries considering whether to sign and ratify the Convention. The research team will prepare a strategy working paper for the UNCITRAL secretariat, based on research and interviews conducted in the winter and spring quarters. The Project welcomes Law and IPS graduate students intereste more »
As the core legal body of the United Nations system in the field of international trade law, the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) has developed procedural rules to promote transparency and public accessibility to treaty-based investor-state arbitration. In contrast to traditional closed proceedings, the new Rules on Transparency take into account both the public interest and the interest of the parties to resolve arbitration disputes in a fair and efficient manner. Focusing on the 2014 UN Convention on Transparency in Treaty-based Investor-State Arbitration, students will review UNCITRAL Working Group III documents to identify issues of concern and benefit for individual countries considering whether to sign and ratify the Convention. The research team will prepare a strategy working paper for the UNCITRAL secretariat, based on research and interviews conducted in the winter and spring quarters. The Project welcomes Law and IPS graduate students interested in international investor-state arbitration, but winter 2018 enrollment in this policy lab is a prerequisite for enrollment in spring 2018 quarter. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section 01 (Mandatory P/R/F) into section 02 (H/P/R/F) which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F
Instructors: Martinez, J. (PI)

LAWGEN 209Q: Community Police Academy

This course aims to demystify public safety, build trust, and develop partnerships between the police department and the community it serves. Each session is taught by a different deputy or staff member and is designed to expand each participant's knowledge of the duties, responsibilities, decisions, and constraints in the field of law enforcement. The class will discuss topics such as laws of arrest, search and seizure, alcohol laws (to be explored in a DUI wet lab), patrol procedures, officer safety, vehicle stops, CSI vs. reality, emergency communications, and defensive tactics and force options, culminating with a session of scenarios to bring the material to life. In addition to the weekly class, participants are invited to attend field trips, for more in-depth experiences. Past field trips have included the coroner's office, Palo Alto Communications dispatch center, and the San Jose Main Jail. The course is open to all Stanford students, staff, and residents over 18 years of age. While this course is open to all students throughout the University, the units will not count toward the requirements for a law degree. Special Instructions: Live Scan records check required. Go to police.stanford.edu/community-outreach.html for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Wilson, L. (PI)

LIFE 145: Trauma, healing, and empowerment (CSRE 145H)

This course will look at the ways in which humans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 65: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, CSRE 21, LINGUIST 265)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rickford, J. (PI)

ME 105: Designing for Impact

This course will introduce the design thinking process and skills, and explore unique challenges of solving problems and initiating action for public good. Design skills such as need-finding, insight development, and prototyping will be learned through project work, with a particular emphasis on the elements required to be effective in the social sector. ME101 recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Benjamin, C. (PI)

ME 139: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 139, EDUC 239, ME 231)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Goldman, S. (PI)

ME 170A: Mechanical Engineering Design- Integrating Context with Engineering

First course of two-quarter capstone sequence. Working in project teams, design and develop an engineering system addressing a real-world problem. Projects are based on themes addressing most pressing needs of human society; for 2017-2018 the theme is clean energy. Learn and utilize industry development process; first quarter focuses on establishing requirements and narrowing to top concept. Second quarter emphasizes engineering analysis, design risk assessment, build, test and iteration. Learn and apply professional communication skills in the areas of speaking, presenting, writing, and listening. This is the first quarter of a 2-quarter course. Students must also enroll in ME 170b; completion of 170b required to earn grade in 170a. Enrollment limited, by application only.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 170B: Mechanical Engineering Design: Integrating Context with Engineering

Second course of two-quarter capstone sequence. Working in project teams, design and develop an engineering system addressing a real-world problem. Projects are based on themes, addressing most pressing needs of human society; for 2017-2018 the theme is clean energy. Learn and utilize industry development process; first quarter focuses on establishing requirements and narrowing to top concept, second quarter emphasizes engineering analysis, design risk assessment, build, test and iteration. Learn and apply professional communication skills in the areas of speaking, presenting, writing, and listening.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 177: Global Engineers' Education

A project based course for those who would like to use their engineering backgrounds to address real world challenges faced by underserved communities globally. In direct collaboration with an underserved community from a rural village in India, students will develop engineering solutions to the challenge of sanitation and hygiene. Focus will be on working with the community rather than for them. Concepts covered will include designing with what designers care about at the center, articulating and realizing individual and community aspirations, ethics of engaging with underserved communities, and methodology of working sustainably with an underserved community.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints