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131 - 140 of 202 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

LAW 805Z: Policy Practicum: Rethinking INTERPOL's Governance Model

Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national and local police agencies is critical in supporting efforts to combat cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL---the world's largest international police organization'is constantly innovating to respond effectively to the world's evolving threat landscape. As a leader in global policing efforts, INTERPOL launched the INTERPOL 2020 Initiative to review the Organization's strategy and develop a roadmap for strengthening its policing capabilities. INTERPOL 2020 will provide the strategic framework to ensure the Organization remains a leader and respected voice in global security matters. This practicum will allow students to assist INTERPOL in modernizing its organizational structure to better fight cyber-crime and terrorism. Students in this practicum more »
Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national and local police agencies is critical in supporting efforts to combat cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL---the world's largest international police organization'is constantly innovating to respond effectively to the world's evolving threat landscape. As a leader in global policing efforts, INTERPOL launched the INTERPOL 2020 Initiative to review the Organization's strategy and develop a roadmap for strengthening its policing capabilities. INTERPOL 2020 will provide the strategic framework to ensure the Organization remains a leader and respected voice in global security matters. This practicum will allow students to assist INTERPOL in modernizing its organizational structure to better fight cyber-crime and terrorism. Students in this practicum will contribute to the Strategic Framework 2017-2020, focusing on comparative governance practices for international organizations. The practicum will analyze decision-making processes within the organization and across other similar organizations (acknowledging their respective mandates) with respect to specific issues identified by INTERPOL. The work product developed during the course of this practicum will serve as part of a framework for INTERPOL to guide and support the development of its governance model. Students in practicum will work directly with INTERPOL clients (via Video-conferencing and email) and may have opportunities to travel to INTERPOL headquarters in Lyon for meetings with clients to develop our policy guidance and provide policy briefings. In addition, selected students in the practicum may have the opportunity to pursue internships and/or externships at the Office of Legal Affairs, INTERPOL General Secretariat in Lyon, France and/or at INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore. Open to graduate students from outside the Law School and, in exceptional cases, to advanced undergraduate students, the practicum seeks those who demonstrate strong interest and background in global security and international law, organizational behavior, and strategic management. This practicum takes place for two quarters (Fall and Winter). Although students may enroll for either one or both quarters, we will give preference to students who agree to enroll for both quarters. Autumn Quarter is offered for 2 or 3 units. Winter Quarter is offered for 2 units. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with International Policy Studies ( IPS 255).
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 806A: Policy Practicum: Voting Technology

CLIENT: Committee on the Future of Voting of the National Academies of Sciences. The Committee on the Future of Voting is seeking Practicum research support for an exhaustive study of technology, standards, and resources for voting technologies, including challenges related to the 2016 election. As described on the website for National Academies of Science, Engineering, & Medicine, this "ad hoc committee, under the auspices of the Committee on Science, Technology and Law and the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, will conduct a study that will: (1) document the current state of play in terms of technology, standards, and resources for voting technologies; (2) examine challenges arising out of the 2016 federal election; (3) evaluate advances in technology currently (and soon to be) available that may improve voting; and (4) offer recommendations that provide a vision of voting that is easier, accessible, reliable, and verifiable. The committee will issue a report at the conc more »
CLIENT: Committee on the Future of Voting of the National Academies of Sciences. The Committee on the Future of Voting is seeking Practicum research support for an exhaustive study of technology, standards, and resources for voting technologies, including challenges related to the 2016 election. As described on the website for National Academies of Science, Engineering, & Medicine, this "ad hoc committee, under the auspices of the Committee on Science, Technology and Law and the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, will conduct a study that will: (1) document the current state of play in terms of technology, standards, and resources for voting technologies; (2) examine challenges arising out of the 2016 federal election; (3) evaluate advances in technology currently (and soon to be) available that may improve voting; and (4) offer recommendations that provide a vision of voting that is easier, accessible, reliable, and verifiable. The committee will issue a report at the conclusion of the study." Students in this Practicum will summarize the available literature and government reports on the state of voting technology and develop a bibliography to aid the Committee. The Practicum seeks to build a graduate team of students from law, computer science, and political science to examine issues specific to their academic areas. Students will meet regularly with Professor Persily one on one or in small teams, depending on the project. Additional information on the Committee can be found at the following link: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/stl/voting/index.htm. Students may enroll in any quarter and those seeking R credit may, with consent of the instructor, move from Section 1 (2 credits) to Section 2 (3 credits for R work), during the first week of the term. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Paper.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

LAW 806C: Policy Practicum: Fake News and Misinformation

CLIENT: Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative. This Practicum works closely with the Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative on an exhaustive study of fake news, misinformation, disinformation and propaganda and their implications for democracy in America and around the world. The client, the Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative, is developing a grant-making program for interventions in the spread of fake news and misinformation which also promote accurate information for a healthy, deliberative democracy. The Practicum builds on the work of a Spring 2017 Practicum, led by Senator Russ Feingold, which analyzed the roles of major online platforms -- Google, Facebook, Reddit, and Twitter -- in proliferating fake news and misinformation in the 2016 election. Students will contribute to that study with their own independent research focusing on such issues as self-regulation by the platforms, legal and regulatory frameworks, analysis of algorithms and user data, and other issues that arise more »
CLIENT: Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative. This Practicum works closely with the Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative on an exhaustive study of fake news, misinformation, disinformation and propaganda and their implications for democracy in America and around the world. The client, the Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative, is developing a grant-making program for interventions in the spread of fake news and misinformation which also promote accurate information for a healthy, deliberative democracy. The Practicum builds on the work of a Spring 2017 Practicum, led by Senator Russ Feingold, which analyzed the roles of major online platforms -- Google, Facebook, Reddit, and Twitter -- in proliferating fake news and misinformation in the 2016 election. Students will contribute to that study with their own independent research focusing on such issues as self-regulation by the platforms, legal and regulatory frameworks, analysis of algorithms and user data, and other issues that arise with current events or through ongoing research findings. Students will undertake literature reviews, legal case analysis, investigations of business practices and algorithms associated with the relevant platforms, surveys of the roles of foreign governments, and analysis of policy proposals to combat fake news, misinformation, disinformation, and propaganda. In addition to law, students in the fields of communications, computer science, journalism, political science, and public policy are especially welcome to join the research team. Students will meet one on one with Professor Persily to frame their research and discuss their findings. Students may enroll in any quarter. Those law students seeking R credit may, with consent of the instructor, move from section 1 to section 2. Section 1 is open enrollment for any law or graduate student. Undergraduates may, in exceptional cases, be admitted to the Practicum with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, Final Paper. NOTES: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

LAW 806D: Policy Practicum: Expanding Access to the Legal Bar for the Formerly Incarcerated

The Stanford Criminal Justice Center is undertaking a project to increase the participation of formerly incarcerated people in the legal profession who have an interest in pursuing legal careers but who face challenges in overcoming the moral character requirement to bar admission. The project includes surveying best practices, advocacy with the State Bar and could eventually lead to supporting California Bar applicants in moral character hearing determinations. This two-quarter lab will also host a national roundtable that brings together scholars, advocates, and Bar representatives to develop best practices, reported in a final white paper, on law school admission and Bar consideration of applicants with criminal records. We are seeking four to six law students to participate. Students may enroll in both quarters. Elements used in grading: Performance, Class participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. NOTES: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of dir more »
The Stanford Criminal Justice Center is undertaking a project to increase the participation of formerly incarcerated people in the legal profession who have an interest in pursuing legal careers but who face challenges in overcoming the moral character requirement to bar admission. The project includes surveying best practices, advocacy with the State Bar and could eventually lead to supporting California Bar applicants in moral character hearing determinations. This two-quarter lab will also host a national roundtable that brings together scholars, advocates, and Bar representatives to develop best practices, reported in a final white paper, on law school admission and Bar consideration of applicants with criminal records. We are seeking four to six law students to participate. Students may enroll in both quarters. Elements used in grading: Performance, Class participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. NOTES: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 806F: Policy Practicum: Accountability for the Unintended Consequences of Impact Investing

As the impact investing industry grows exponentially into trillions of dollars, investors, scholars, and industry leaders are increasingly focused on improving metrics and standards. They recognize the need to define impact, critically evaluate philanthropic trade-offs, and apply due diligence standards to evaluate social and environmental risk. Despite this trend, however, no accountability framework exists to manage the potential for harm to people and the environment from impact investing. To ensure that impact investing lives up to its name, a system is needed that holds investors accountable for harm to local communities and their environments. Other traditional development finance institutions -- such as OPIC or the World Bank's IFC -- have been routinely applying policy and accountability frameworks for decades to manage their social and environmental risks and to remedy harm. When these institutions invest in a project, they bring environmental and human rights standards and ci more »
As the impact investing industry grows exponentially into trillions of dollars, investors, scholars, and industry leaders are increasingly focused on improving metrics and standards. They recognize the need to define impact, critically evaluate philanthropic trade-offs, and apply due diligence standards to evaluate social and environmental risk. Despite this trend, however, no accountability framework exists to manage the potential for harm to people and the environment from impact investing. To ensure that impact investing lives up to its name, a system is needed that holds investors accountable for harm to local communities and their environments. Other traditional development finance institutions -- such as OPIC or the World Bank's IFC -- have been routinely applying policy and accountability frameworks for decades to manage their social and environmental risks and to remedy harm. When these institutions invest in a project, they bring environmental and human rights standards and citizen-driven complaint systems that local communities can use to address a grievance. If an impact investor (e.g. a private foundation, individual investor, or private bank¿s impact fund) is funding that same project without traditional development institutions involved, chances are there is no way that communities can have their voices heard or receive remedy for harm. Yet the failure to take seriously the risks of social and environmental harm can lead to catastrophic financial, human, and environmental outcomes. In "Accountability: The Golden Opportunity in Impact Investing" https://ssir.org/articles/entry/accountability_the_golden_opportunity_in_impact_investing , Natalie Bridgeman Fields describes Accountability Counsel cases in Liberia and Mexico that demonstrate not only the importance of community-driven accountability but also concrete examples of an accountability framework. This project develops a system that enables impact project asset owners access to information about their asset's compliance, evaluation tools, and grievance systems. The practicum team will work closely with Accountability Counsel staff to develop an accountability and learning system for impact investment that guarantees that assets: (1) comply with policies to protect people and the environment, (2) have evaluation tools that assess their impact, and (3) offer grievance methods to address social or environmental harms associated when they do occur. The potential positive impact for impact investing grounded in an accountability framework is staggering. According to a recent report from Morgan Stanley, ¿sustainable investment¿ has grown more than 33 percent over the last two years to $9 trillion, and will only continue to grow as impact investing becomes more accessible. If impact investing scales further without governance and accountability structures in place to prevent abuse and address harm, the consequences to local communities are dire. They will be certain to include the land grabs, contamination of water, labor rights abuses, and displacement of indigenous people that are typical of investments where there is weak rule of law and use of land and labor. Benefits of creating a robust accountability framework, if achieved, could spread beyond impact investing and could extend across global finance, including development finance, where existing frameworks could be improved based on leadership from the impact investing community. The practicum seeks interdisciplinary graduate students from law, international development, economics, project finance, impact investing, international human rights law, policy advocacy, business, and/or philanthropy. The research team will collaboratively produce a report for a sustained advocacy campaign with lessons and practices for accountability within impact investing. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Final Paper. NOTES: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAWGEN 209Q: Community Police Academy

This course aims to demystify public safety, build trust, and develop partnerships between the police department and the community it serves. Each session is taught by a different deputy or staff member and is designed to expand each participant's knowledge of the duties, responsibilities, decisions, and constraints in the field of law enforcement. The class will discuss topics such as laws of arrest, search and seizure, alcohol laws (to be explored in a DUI wet lab), patrol procedures, officer safety, vehicle stops, CSI vs. reality, emergency communications, and defensive tactics and force options, culminating with a session of scenarios to bring the material to life. In addition to the weekly class, participants are invited to attend field trips, for more in-depth experiences. Past field trips have included the coroner's office, Palo Alto Communications dispatch center, and the San Jose Main Jail. The course is open to all Stanford students, staff, and residents over 18 years of age. While this course is open to all students throughout the University, the units will not count toward the requirements for a law degree. Special Instructions: Live Scan records check required. Go to police.stanford.edu/community-outreach.html for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Wilson, L. (PI)

LINGUIST 65: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, CSRE 21)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the ¿Living Arts¿ of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).nUNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular ¿AAVE Happenin¿ at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 105: Designing for Impact

This course will introduce the design thinking process and skills, and explore unique challenges of solving problems and initiating action for public good. Design skills such as need-finding, insight development, and prototyping will be learned through project work, with a particular emphasis on the elements required to be effective in the social sector. Prerequisite: ME101.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 139: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 139, EDUC 239, ME 231)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Goldman, S. (PI)

ME 177: Global Engineers' Education

A project based course for those who would like to use their engineering backgrounds to address real world challenges faced by underserved communities globally. In direct collaboration with an underserved community from a rural village in India, students will develop engineering solutions to the challenge of sanitation and hygiene. Focus will be on working with the community rather than for them. Concepts covered will include designing with what designers care about at the center, articulating and realizing individual and community aspirations, ethics of engaging with underserved communities, and methodology of working sustainably with an underserved community.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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