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1 - 10 of 12 results for: URBANST ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

URBANST 20: Exploring Urbanism in San Francisco: Three Urban Adventures to Better Understand Cities

What makes San Francisco distinctive as a city? How have designers, architects, builders and planners shaped the city, and how does their work affect San Francisco and its people? This Urban Studies pop-up class will introduce students to the unique architecture and urbanism of San Francisco. A series of three guided walking tours will provide an insider's perspective on the City's most interesting neighborhoods and will also explore core themes and topics in the field of urban design. An informal 90 minute on-campus discussion and slideshow of student-generated imagery (on the Thursday evening following each tour) will allow for an expanded conversation about the urban environment. This course is intended for freshmen and sophomores.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 114: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (ANTHRO 126)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. We will study urban space both historically and cross-culturally. Urban Studies, by definition, is an interdisciplinary field, where the methodological approaches draw upon a diverse set of analytic tools. Disciplines that occupy a prominent place in this class are geography, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, media studies, and literature. In this context, we will discuss the importance of cities around the world to the economic, cultural, and political well-being of modern societies and examine how forces such as industrialization, decentralization, and globalization affect the structure and function of cities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hansen, T. (PI)

URBANST 131: VIP: Very Impactful People - Social Innovation & the Social Entrepreneur

Invited lecture series. Perspectives and endeavors of entrepreneurs and thought leaders who address social needs in the U.S. and internationally through private, for-profit and nonprofit organizations or public institutions. The lecture and Q&A is from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., followed by an optional discussion period with the speaker including dinner.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Edwards, M. (PI)

URBANST 140F: Casablanca - Algiers - Tunis : Cities on the Edge (FRENCH 236, FRENCH 336)

From the North Africans who dream of Europe, to the Euro-Americans who dream of North Africa, Casablanca, Algiers and Tunis symbolize three territories, real and imaginary, which never cease to inspire and challenge the preconceptions of travelers setting sight on their shores. In this class, we will explore the myriad ways in which these three emblematic cities of North Africa on the edge of Europe and Africa, cultivate a "je-ne-sais-quoi" of literary and cinematographic mystery. They are an ebullient laboratory of social, political, religious, and cultural issues, past and present, from the Algerian War to the Arab Spring, from the refuge of the outcast to the migrant plight of the "harragas" crossing the Mediterranean. Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents. Taught in English.nnn"Play it again, Sam" : Casablanca is synonymous with one of the most iconic films in Hollywood history and the most quoted lines in cinema. We will explore the reality behind the myth, "Casanegra" behind "Casablanca."n nFrom "Algiers the White" to "Algiers the Red", Algiers has nourished the fertile imagination of writers, filmmakers, political activists from Albert Camus to Che Guevara, from Assia Djebar to the Black Panthers.n nTunis has constantly attracted writers and filmmakers alike, from Guy de Maupassant to Moufida Tlatli, from Albert Memmi to JR.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

URBANST 164: Sustainable Cities (EARTHSYS 160)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)

URBANST 194: Internship in Urban Studies

For Urban Studies majors only. Students organize an internship in an office of a government agency, a community organization, or a private firm directly relevant to the major. Reading supplements internship. Paper summarizes internship experience and related readings.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

URBANST 195: Special Projects in Urban Studies

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 197: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 198: Senior Research in Public Service

Limited to seniors approved by their departments for honors thesis and admitted to the year-round Public Service Scholars Program sponsored by the Haas Center for Public Service. What standards in addition to those expected by the academy apply to research conducted as a form of public service? How can communities benefit from research? Theory and practice of research as a form of public service readings, thesis workshops, and public presentation of completed research. May be repeated for credit. Corequisite: 199.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 199: Senior Honors Thesis

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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