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1 - 10 of 42 results for: SOC ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SOC 1: Introduction to Sociology at Stanford

This course to get students to think like a sociologist; to use core concepts and theories from the field of sociology to make sense of the most pressing issues of our time: race and ethnicity; gender and sexuality; family; education; social class and economic inequality; social connectedness; social movements; and immigration. The course will draw heavily on the research and writing of Stanford¿s own sociologist.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jimenez, T. (PI)

SOC 14N: Inequality in American Society

An overview of the major forms of inequality in American society, their causes and consequences. Special attention will devoted to to public policy associated with inequality.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 45Q: Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society (CSRE 45Q)

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 114: Economic Sociology (SOC 214)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 137: Global Inequality

Absolute world poverty has declined considerably in the last twenty years, but elites have gained disproportionately from the growth of the global economy, leading to serious concerns about inequality in several countries, as well as in global policy circles. This discussion-based seminar explores how global capitalism affects worldwide inequality. Topics include the evolution, causes, and structure of global inequality, the links between inequality and human development, and potential solutions to global inequality.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Young, P. (PI)

SOC 156A: The Changing American City (CSRE 156, SOC 256A, URBANST 156A)

After decades of decline, U.S. cities today are undergoing major transformations. Young professionals, Millenials, and members of the creative class are flocking to cities. Massive waves of immigration have transformed the racial and ethnic compositions of cities and their neighborhoods. Public housing projects that once defined the inner city are disappearing, and the recent housing boom and bust shook up the urban landscape. This class will include readings and discussion on contemporary developments in U.S. cities and how they relate to race, ethnicity, and class. Topics include immigration, gentrification, crime, public housing, and the housing crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hwang, J. (PI)

SOC 179N: The Science of Diverse Communities (CSRE 30N, EDUC 30N, PSYCH 30N)

This course is an exploration. Most generally, its aim is to identify distinguishing features of good diverse communities and articulate them well enough to offer principles or guidelines for how to design and manage such communities¿all with a particular focus on educational communities like schools, universities, academic disciplines, etc., but with the hope that such principles might generalize to other kinds of organizations and the broader society. The readings range from those on the origins of human communities and social identities to those on intergroup trust building. They also aim to embed our discussions in the major ¿diversity¿ issues of the day¿for example, what¿s in the news about campus life. nnThus the course has a practical purpose: to develop testable ideas for improving the comfort level, fairness and goodness-for-all of ¿identity¿ diverse communities--especially in educational settings. nnThe course also has a basic science purpose: to explore the psychological sig more »
This course is an exploration. Most generally, its aim is to identify distinguishing features of good diverse communities and articulate them well enough to offer principles or guidelines for how to design and manage such communities¿all with a particular focus on educational communities like schools, universities, academic disciplines, etc., but with the hope that such principles might generalize to other kinds of organizations and the broader society. The readings range from those on the origins of human communities and social identities to those on intergroup trust building. They also aim to embed our discussions in the major ¿diversity¿ issues of the day¿for example, what¿s in the news about campus life. nnThus the course has a practical purpose: to develop testable ideas for improving the comfort level, fairness and goodness-for-all of ¿identity¿ diverse communities--especially in educational settings. nnThe course also has a basic science purpose: to explore the psychological significance of community. Is there a psychological need for community? Is there something about a need for community that can¿t be reduced to other needs¿for example, for a gender, racial or sexual-orientation identity? How strong is the need for community¿against other needs? What kinds of human grouping¿s can satisfy it? In meeting this need, can membership in one community substitute for membership in others? What do people need from communities in order to thrive in them? Do strong diverse communities dampen intergroup biases? Can strong community loyalty mitigate identity tensions within communities? And so on. nnSuch questions, the hope is, will help us develop a more systematic understanding of the challenges and opportunities inherent in diverse human communities
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Steele, C. (PI)

SOC 186: Introduction to Disability Studies and Disability Rights (ETHICSOC 104X, FEMGEN 94H, HUMRTS 104)

Disability Studies is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field that examines disability as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. This is an introductory course to the field of disability studies and it aims to investigate the complex concept of disability through a variety of prisms and disciplines including social psychology, the humanities, legal studies and media studies. This course also focuses on the multiple connections between the study of disability and other identities including class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and also includes a comparative look at how disability is treated across cultures. Some of the topics covered in the class are disability and the family, the history of the disability rights movement, the development of disability identity and its intersectionality, antidiscrimination law, the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, bioethical dilemmas pertaining to disability and more.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dorfman, D. (PI)

SOC 190: Undergraduate Individual Study

Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 191: Undergraduate Directed Research

Work on a project of student's choice under supervision of a faculty member. Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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