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1 - 10 of 15 results for: IPS ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

IPS 202: Topics in International Macroeconomics

Topics: standard theories of open economy macroeconomics, exchange rate regimes, causes and consequences of current account imbalances, the economics of monetary unification and the European Monetary Union, recent financial and currency crises, the International Monetary Fund and the reform of the international financial architecture. Prerequisites: Econ 52 and Econ 165.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

IPS 204A: Microeconomics for Policy (PUBLPOL 51, PUBLPOL 301A)

Microeconomic concepts relevant to decision making. Topics include: competitive market clearing, price discrimination; general equilibrium; risk aversion and sharing, capital market theory, Nash equilibrium; welfare analysis; public choice; externalities and public goods; hidden information and market signaling; moral hazard and incentives; auction theory; game theory; oligopoly; reputation and credibility. Undergraduate Public Policy students may take PublPol 51 as a substitute for the Econ 51 major requirement. Economics majors still need to take Econ 51. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and MATH 51 or equiv.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 209: Practicum

Applied policy exercises in various fields. Multidisciplinary student teams apply skills to a contemporary problem in a major international policy exercise with a public sector client such as a government agency. Problem analysis, interaction with the client and experts, and presentations. Emphasis is on effective written and oral communication to lay audiences of recommendations based on policy analysis. Enrollment must be split between Autumn and Winter Quarters for a total of 8 units.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 209A: IPS Master's Thesis

For IPS M.A. students only (by petition). Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 210: The Politics of International Humanitarian Action

The relationship between humanitarianism and politics in international responses to civil conflicts and forced displacement. Focus is on policy dilemmas and choices, and the consequences of action or inaction. Case studies include northern Iraq (Kurdistan), Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, and Darfur. In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

IPS 214: Refugees in the Twenty-first Century

The focus of this graduate seminar is policy dilemmas in international responses to massive population movements. In 2015 and 2016 hundreds of thousands of persons from the Middle East (particularly Syria) and Africa fled their home countries and attempted to cross into Europe by sea. In September 2016, the United Nations General Assembly unanimously adopted the "New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants". This political declaration aims to improve the international response to large movements of refugees and migrants, including protracted refugee situations. One of the many challenges confronting this multilateral diplomatic undertaking is that the definition of the word "refugee" is contested, as is the process to determine who is a refugee. This course will provide an immersive examination of the causes and consequences of refugee movements. This course is a seminar that requires full student attendance and participation. A focus of the course is to develop the skills of students in writing policy memos. Students will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions on their policy memos.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

IPS 230: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (INTNLREL 114D, POLISCI 114D, POLISCI 314D)

Links among the establishment of democracy, economic growth, and the rule of law. How democratic, economically developed states arise. How the rule of law can be established where it has been historically absent. Variations in how such systems function and the consequences of institutional forms and choices. How democratic systems have arisen in different parts of the world. Available policy instruments used in international democracy, rule of law, and development promotion efforts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fukuyama, F. (PI)

IPS 237: Religion and Politics: A Threat to Democracy? (JEWISHST 237)

The meddling of religion in politics has become a major global issue. Can religion co-exist with politics in a democracy? In Israel this is an acute issue exhibiting an existential question: To what extent religion is a source of the weaknesses and vulnerabilities of Israeli Democracy? The course offered is a research workshop, part of a policy-oriented applied research in motion. The workshop will meet a few times during the Fall Quarter and the instructor will be available to consult with the workshop's participants on a bi-weekly basis. The workshop will include unique opportunities for hands-on, team-based research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Carmon, A. (PI)

IPS 255: Policy Practicum: Rethinking INTERPOL's Governance Model

Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national and local police agencies is critical in supporting efforts to combat cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL---the world's largest international police organization'is constantly innovating to respond effectively to the world's evolving threat landscape. As a leader in global policing efforts, INTERPOL launched the INTERPOL 2020 Initiative to review the Organization's strategy and develop a roadmap for strengthening its policing capabilities. INTERPOL 2020 will provide the strategic framework to ensure the Organization remains a leader and respected voice in global security matters. This practicum will allow students to assist INTERPOL in modernizing its organizational structure to better fight cyber-crime and terrorism. Students in this practicum more »
Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national and local police agencies is critical in supporting efforts to combat cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL---the world's largest international police organization'is constantly innovating to respond effectively to the world's evolving threat landscape. As a leader in global policing efforts, INTERPOL launched the INTERPOL 2020 Initiative to review the Organization's strategy and develop a roadmap for strengthening its policing capabilities. INTERPOL 2020 will provide the strategic framework to ensure the Organization remains a leader and respected voice in global security matters. This practicum will allow students to assist INTERPOL in modernizing its organizational structure to better fight cyber-crime and terrorism. Students in this practicum will contribute to the Strategic Framework 2017-2020, focusing on comparative governance practices for international organizations. The practicum will analyze decision-making processes within the organization and across other similar organizations (acknowledging their respective mandates) with respect to specific issues identified by INTERPOL. The work product developed during the course of this practicum will serve as part of a framework for INTERPOL to guide and support the development of its governance model. Students in practicum will work directly with INTERPOL clients (via Video-conferencing and email) and may have opportunities to travel to INTERPOL headquarters in Lyon for meetings with clients to develop our policy guidance and provide policy briefings. In addition, selected students in the practicum may have the opportunity to pursue internships and/or externships at the Office of Legal Affairs, INTERPOL General Secretariat in Lyon, France and/or at INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore. Open to graduate students from outside the Law School and, in exceptional cases, to advanced undergraduate students, the practicum seeks those who demonstrate strong interest and background in global security and international law, organizational behavior, and strategic management. This practicum takes place for two quarters (Fall and Winter). Although students may enroll for either one or both quarters, we will give preference to students who agree to enroll for both quarters. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. NOTE (for LAW students): Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with LAW 805Z.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

IPS 275: UN Habitat III: Bridging Cities and Nations to Tackle Urban Development

From climate change to refugee housing, cities have powered into an expanding role in international affairs, helping national governments navigate critical global challenges. Every twenty years, the world convenes at the United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (HABITAT) to debate human settlement and collectively redraw our urban future. Using HABITAT III in Quito as a lens, we explore urban growth and governance; technology and finance; environmental and cultural sustainability; international negotiations and multilateral cooperation. Includes independent research on themes from HABITAT III and the New Urban Agenda.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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