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1 - 10 of 21 results for: COMPLIT ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMPLIT 37Q: Zionism and the Novel (JEWISHST 37Q)

At the end of the nineteenth century, Zionism emerged as a political movement to establish a national homeland for the Jews, eventually leading to the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. This seminar uses novels to explore the changes in Zionism, the roots of the conflict in the Middle East, and the potentials for the future. We will take a close look at novels by Israelis, both Jewish and Arab, in order to understand multiple perspectives, and we will also consider works by authors from the North America and from Europe. Note: This course must be taken for a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

COMPLIT 55N: Batman, Hamilton, Díaz, and Other Wondrous Lives (CSRE 55N)

This seminar concerns the design and analysis of imaginary (or constructed) worlds for narratives and media such as films, comics, and literary texts. The seminar's primary goal is to help participants understand the creation of better imaginary worlds - ultimately all our efforts should serve that higher purpose. Some of the things we will consider when taking on the analysis of a new world include: What are its primary features - spatial, cultural, biological, fantastic, cosmological? What is the world's ethos (the guiding beliefs or ideals that characterize the world)? What are the precise strategies that are used by the artist to convey the world to us and us to the world? How are our characters connected to the world? And how are we - the viewer or reader or player - connected to the world? Note: This course must be taken for a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Saldivar, J. (PI)

COMPLIT 101: What Is Comparative Literature?

The course, open to all undergraduates, is for anyone serious about literature. After first asking what "literature" is and what cultural roles it may fulfil, the course continues by exploring what, then, may be the cultural, political, historical and institutional needs to which "comparative literature" responds. A short story by Jorge Luis Borges and an accompanying essay serve as an introduction to both sets of questions. We will then look at a few texts of the western tradition from Aristotle through the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, taken as standard for later ideas and practices of literature, eventually, too, at one or two that clearly acknowledge possibilities of quite different traditions for the role played by what may be called the "fictive imagination." A series of texts, two plays, two (possibly three) novels, some poems, some critical writings, will then show other traditions interacting transculturally with and/or against western ones. Students will be able to choose their readings among several. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 5 units and a letter grade to be eligible for WIM credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 121: Poems, Poetry, Worlds (DLCL 141)

What is poetry? How does it speak in many voices to questions of philosophy, history, society, and personal experience? Why does it matter? The reading and interpretation of poetry in crosscultural comparison as experience, invention, form, sound, knowledge, and part of the world. The readings address poetry of several cultures (Germany, France, Russia, Greece, Italy, Israel and Palestine) in comparative relation to that of the English-speaking world, and in light of classic and recent theories of poetry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Eshel, A. (PI)

COMPLIT 134: Asian American History through Literature

History presents us with the historical fact and shows how these facts add up. Literature helps explore the human significance of historical facts. In this course we will focus on a number of works of Asian American literature that each depict specific moments in the development of Asian American history, and discuss how the authors feel the effects of that history and represent those effects through literature. There are no pre-requisites for the course, but students are expected to read and analyze carefully and critically, and to be serious and active participants in the class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 145: Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature (AMELANG 126, JEWISHST 106)

How literary works outside the realm of Western culture struggle with questions such as identity, minority, and the issue of the Other. How the Arab is viewed in Hebrew literature, film and music and how the Jew is viewed in Palestinian works in Hebrew or Arabic (in translation to English). Historical, political, and sociological forces that have contributed to the shaping of these writers' views. Guest lectures about the Jew in Palestinian literature and music. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

COMPLIT 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 183: Self-Impersonation: Fiction, Autobiography, Memoir (ENGLISH 183E)

Course will examine the intersecting genres of fiction, autobiography, and memoir. Topics will include the literary construction of selfhood and its constituent categories (gender, race, ethnicity, religion, etc.); the role of language in the development of the self; the relational nature of the self (vis-à-vis the family, "society," God); the cultural status of "individuality"; the concept of childhood; and the role of individual testimony in our understanding of family, religious and national history. In addition to short theoretical works, authors will include Knausgaard, Nabokov, Hoffman, Winterson, Said, Levi, Barthes, and Duras.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 194: Independent Research

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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