2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 8 of 8 results for: BIOS ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

BIOS 200: Foundations in Experimental Biology

This course is divided into two 3-week cycles. During the first cycle, students will be developing a 2-page original research proposal, which may be used for NSF or other fellowship applications. In the second cycle, students will work in small teams and will be mentored by faculty to develop an original research project for oral presentation. Skills emphasized include: 1) reading for breadth and depth; 2) developing compelling, creative arguments; 3) communicating with the spoken and written word; 4) working in teams. Important features of the course include peer assessment, interactive joint classes, and substantial face-to-face discussion with faculty drawn from across the Biosciences programs. Shortened autumn quarter class; class meets during weeks 1 through 8 of the quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOS 204: Practical Tutorial on the Modeling of Signal Transduction Motifs

Basics of ordinary differential equation modeling of signal transduction motifs, small circuits of regulatory proteins and genes that serve as building blocks of complex regulatory circuits. Morning session covers numerical modeling experiments. Afternoon session explores theory underpinning that day's modeling session. Modeling done using Mathematica, Standard Edition provided to enrolled students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Ferrell, J. (PI)

BIOS 205: Introduction to R for Data Analysis

Autumn quarter enrollment limited to ADVANCE students; instructor consent required for enrollment. Topics include: basics of R (widely used, open-source programming and data analysis environment) programming language and data structures, reading/writing files, graphics tools for figure generation, basic statistical and regression operations, survey of relevant R library packages. Interactive format combining lectures and computer lab. For course and enrollment information, see https://web.stanford.edu/~sbagley2/bios205/
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Bagley, S. (PI)

BIOS 242: Writing Compelling Fellowships and Career Development Awards

An overview of principles and fundamentals for writing competitive fellowships (e.g. NIH F31, F32) and career development awards (e.g. NIH K Awards). Topics include: developing specific aims and career development plans; using the review criteria to inform writing; timelines and resources. Participants develop proposals through guided exercises with an emphasis on in-class peer review and focused faculty feedback.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Botham, C. (PI)

BIOS 254: DataLucence::Images

Increasingly, research in the biosciences involves data in digital formats and scientists spend a significant fraction of their time building and using software to harvest insight from digital data. A central goal of this course is to expose students to concepts adopted from computer science and data science regarding data management, data curation, and analytical workflows for analyzing digital data. We will focus on digital images since this image type is used in diverse sub-fields in the biosciences. The course will consist of a two-day workshop/lab¿SoftwareCarpentry¿and six DataLucence::Images+Hackathon class meetings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Goodman, M. (PI)

BIOS 271: Writing Graduate Research Fellowships

Initial sessions focus on the basics of grantsmanship, review criteria (i.e. intellectual merit and broader impact), and required materials, with particular focus on the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP). Students draft a 2-page research proposal and 3-page personal, relevant background and future goals statement. During small group peer review sessions, students receive detailed feedback to improve the clarity of their writing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Botham, C. (PI)

BIOS 274: Introductory Python Programming for Genomics

An inherent part of genomics research is the creation and then analysis of large quantities of data. A variety of useful tools arenavailable for data analysis; however, research often requires the skill to create software scripts to extend the analysis. You will learnnthe basics of the Python programming language. Lectures will foster developing the basics through the process of writing code.nDiscussion sections will build on the skills from lectures by applying them to complete assigned problem sets. Problem sets arendesigned to learn good coding style, logic, and the use Python libraries. No programming experience is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOS 301: Graduate Environment of Support

Psychosocial, financial, and career issues in adapting graduate students to Stanford; how these issues relate to diversity, resources, policies, and procedures. Discussions among faculty, advanced graduate students, campus resource people, and the dean's office. (Thomas)
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints