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1 - 10 of 17 results for: ARCHLGY ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ARCHLGY 1: Introduction to Archaeology (ANTHRO 3)

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rick, J. (PI)

ARCHLGY 58: Egypt in the Age of Heresy (AFRICAST 58, CLASSICS 58)

Perhaps the most controversial era in ancient Egyptian history, the Amarna period (c.1350-1334 BCE) was marked by great sociocultural transformation, notably the introduction of a new 'religion' (often considered the world's first form of monotheism), the construction of a new royal city, and radical departures in artistic and architectural styles. This course will introduce archaeological and textual sources of ancient Egypt, investigating topics such as theological promotion, projections of power, social structure, urban design, interregional diplomacy, and historical legacy during the inception, height, and aftermath of this highly enigmatic period. Students with or without prior background are equally encouraged.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bartos, N. (PI)

ARCHLGY 65: Looking out from California: Introduction to North American Prehistoric Archaeology

This course is an archaeological/anthropological course that surveys the different indigenous prehistoric culture areas of North America, and the archaeological approaches to its academic and non-academic study. Topics covered in this course include: the peopling of the New World, subsistence strategies, trade, settlement systems, warfare, religion, social inequality, egalitarianism, the origins of agriculture, identity, gender, environmental relations, and colonial empires among many others. These topics will be explored in class using archaeological case studies paired with instructor lectures as a means to bridge the student's regional competency of ancient cultures with in-depth archaeological research methods.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Acebo, N. (PI)

ARCHLGY 78: Archaeology of Innovation (ANTHRO 78A)

This undergraduate seminar uses engagement with canonical archaeological topics and questions about the emergence of civilization to introduce students to critical perspectives on the nature of novelty, progress, and modernity. The first weeks of the course will be spent learning about archaeological hypotheses and debates on early human innovation (e.g. urban development, agriculture). Later weeks will focus on developing a robust theoretical framework through which to better understand and interrogate claims about the origin of innovation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Weekes, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 92: Introduction to Greek Art and Archaeology

This course will introduce students to the art and archaeology of Greece (and the Greek world) from the Neolithic through Early Roman periods (c. 6000 ¿ 31 BCE). This course is designed to balance a core chronological narrative of the development of various aspects of material culture of Greece with thematic explorations including (but not limited to) such topics as postcolonial approaches to material culture, the archaeology of memory, and archaeology and nationalism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Duray, A. (PI)

ARCHLGY 97: Archaeology Internship

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, museums or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Prior instructor consent needed.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARCHLGY 100D: Chavin de Huantar Research |Seminar (ANTHRO 100D)

Archaeological analytical techniques appropriate for data recovered during archaeological fieldwork in Chavin de Huantar, Peru. Open to all interested students; fieldwork participants are expected to take the course. Students work on data from the previous field season to produce synthetic written reports, focusing on specific methodological issues.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rick, J. (PI)

ARCHLGY 102: Archaeological Methods (ANTHRO 91A)

Methodological issues related to the investigation of archaeological sites and objects. Aims and techniques of archaeologists including: location and excavation of sites; dating of places and objects; analysis of artifacts and technology and the study of ancient people, plants, and animals. How these methods are employed to answer the discipline's larger research questions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

ARCHLGY 102B: Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 106, ANTHRO 206A)

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 119: Zooarchaeology: An Introduction to Faunal Remains (ANTHRO 119, ANTHRO 219)

As regularly noted, whether historic or pre-historic, animal bones are often the most commonly occurring artefacts on archaeological sites. As bioarchaeological samples, they offer the archaeologist an insight into food culture, provisioning, trade and the social aspects of human-animal interactions. The course will be taught through both practical and lecture sessions: the `hands-on¿ component is an essential complement to the lectures. The lectures will offer grounding in the main methodological approaches developed, as well as provide case-studies to illustrate where and how the methods have been applied. The practical session will walk students through the skeletal anatomy of a range of species. It will guide students on the identification of different parts of the animal, how to age / sex individuals, as well as recognize taphonomic indicators and what these mean to reconstructing post-depositional modifications.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)
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