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1 - 10 of 12 results for: APPPHYS ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

APPPHYS 61: Science as a Creative Process (BIO 61)

What is the process of science, and why does creativity matter? We'll delve deeply into the applicability of science in addressing a vast range of real-world problems. This course is designed to teach the scientific method as it's actually practiced by working scientists. It will cover how to ask a well-posed question, how to design a good experiment, how to collect and interpret quantitative data, how to recover from error, and how to communicate findings. Facts matter! Course topics will include experimental design, statistics and statistical significance, formulating appropriate controls, modeling, peer review, and more. The course will incorporate a significant hands-on component featuring device fabrication, testing, and measurement. Among other "Dorm Science" activities, we'll be distributing Arduino microcontroller kits and electronic sensors, then use these items, along with other materials, to complete a variety of group and individual projects outside the classroom. The final course assignment will be to develop and write a scientific grant proposal to test a student-selected myth or scientific controversy. Although helpful, no prior experience with electronics or computer programming is required. Recommended for freshmen.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

APPPHYS 77N: Functional Materials and Devices

Preference to freshmen. Exploration via case studies how functional materials have been developed and incorporated into modern devices. Particular emphasis is on magnetic and dielectric materials and devices. Recommended: high school physics course including electricity and magnetism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Suzuki, Y. (PI)

APPPHYS 79Q: Energy Options for the 21st Century

Preference to sophomores.. Choices for meeting the future energy needs of the U.S. and the world. Basic physics of energy sources, technologies that might be employed, and related public policy issues. Trade-offs and societal impacts of different energy sources. Policy options for making rational choices for a sustainable world energy economy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fox, J. (PI)

APPPHYS 203: Atoms, Fields and Photons

Applied Physics Core course appropriate for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with prior knowledge of elementary quantum mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and ordinary differential equations. Structure of single- and multi-electron atoms and molecules, and cold collisions. Phenomenology and quantitative modeling of atoms in strong fields, with modern applications. Introduction to quantum optical theory of atom-photon interactions, including quantum trajectory theory, mechanical effects of light on atoms, and fundamentals of laser spectroscopy and coherent control.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

APPPHYS 217: Estimation and Control Methods for Applied Physics

Recursive filtering, parameter estimation, and feedback control methods based on linear and nonlinear state-space modeling. Topics in: dynamical systems theory; practical overview of stochastic differential equations; model reduction; and tradeoffs among performance, complexity, and robustness. Numerical implementations in MATLAB. Contemporary applications in systems biology and quantum precision measurement. Prerequisites: linear algebra and ordinary differential equations.
Terms: Aut, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mabuchi, H. (PI)

APPPHYS 273: Solid State Physics II

Introduction to the many-body aspects of crystalline solids. Second quantization of phonons, anharmonic effects, polaritons, and scattering theory. Second quantization of Fermi fields. Electrons in the Hartree-Fock and random phase approximation; electron screening and plasmons. Magnetic exchange interactions. Electron-phonon interaction in ionic/covalent semiconductors and metals; effective attractive electron-electron interactions, Cooper pairing, and BCS description of the superconducting state. Prerequisite: APPPHYS 272 or PHYSICS 172.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hwang, H. (PI)

APPPHYS 290: Directed Studies in Applied Physics

Special studies under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. May include lab work or directed reading.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

APPPHYS 302: Experimental Techniques in Condensed Matter Physics

Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

APPPHYS 390: Dissertation Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

APPPHYS 470: Condensed Matter Seminar

Current research and literature; offered by faculty, students, and outside specialists. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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