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71 - 80 of 95 results for: CIGH::*

MED 233: Global Health: Beyond Diseases and International Organizations

Provides multidisciplinary trainees insight into over-arching themes of global health. Topics include systemic issues affecting healthcare progress globally, ethical and thoughtful approaches to solving these issues, as well as economics, water sanitation, public health, organizations in global health, human rights, involvement in NGOs, ethics of overseas work, and other non-medical aspects of this subject. This course will cover some of the essentials of patient care while working in the field as well including child health care, malaria, TB, and HIV.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 234: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 236: Economics of Infectious Disease and Global Health (HUMBIO 124E)

Introduction to global health topics such as childhood health, hygiene, drug resistance, and pharmaceutical industries from an economic development perspective. Introduces economic concepts including decision-making over time, externalities, and incentives as they relate to health. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Alsan, M. (PI)

MED 242: Physicians and Human Rights

Weekly lectures on how human rights violations affect health. Topics include: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Laws, A. (PI)

MED 262: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (ECON 127)

Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in developing countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

OIT 333: Design for Extreme Affordability

This course is a Bass Seminar. Project course jointly offered by School of Engineering and Graduate School of Business. Students apply engineering and business skills to design product or service prototypes, distribution systems, and business plans for entrepreneurial ventures that meet that challenges faced by the world's poor. Topics include user empathy, appropriate technology design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, social technology entrepreneurship, business modeling, and project management. Weekly design reviews; final course presentation. Industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application; see http://extreme.stanford.edu/index.html for details.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

OSPCPTWN 24A: Targeted Research Project in Community Health and Development

Two-quarter sequence for students engaging in Cape Town-sponsored community based research. Introduction to approaches, methods and critical issues of partnership-based, community-engaged research and to the community-based research partners. Qualitative data gathering and analysis methods in community-based research; effective collaboration with community partners and data sources; race and privilege in community-based research. Preparation of research proposals and plans for research carried out during the second quarter through OSPCPTWN 24B.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPCPTWN 24B: Targeted Research Project in Community Health and Development

Two-quarter sequence for students engaging in Cape Town-sponsored community-based research. Substantive community health or development investigations in collaboration with the Stanford Centre's community partners: Western Cape NGOs or government agencies, or community-based organizations or groups. Students' research supported through methods workshops, sharing of progress and problems, and data and findings presentations. Prerequisite: OSPCPTWN 24A.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Meehan, T. (PI)

OSPCPTWN 43: Public and Community Health in Sub-Saharan Africa

Introduction to concept of public health as compared with clinical medicine. Within a public health context, the broad distribution of health problems in sub-Saharan Africa as compared with U.S. and Europe. In light of South Africa's status as a new democracy, changes that have occurred in health legislation, policy, and service arenas in past 16 years. Topics include: sector health care delivery, current distribution of infectious and chronic diseases, and issues related to sexual and reproductive health in South Africa. Site visits to public sector health services and health related NGOs.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Cooper, D. (PI)
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