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11 - 20 of 46 results for: STRAMGT ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

STRAMGT 322: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch II

This is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from idea to launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations, but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter they will further refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present th more »
This is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from idea to launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations, but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter they will further refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The new course builds on a predecessor course S356 "Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities" and encapsulates new and important research and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is primarily learning by doing (LBD) through a structured process and supported by relevant lectures. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by experienced mentors and review by peers. Field research as well as prototype product development are integral to the course. Since admittance to S321/S322 is by team and the quality of their idea, team formation takes place during the autumn quarter. Informal student mixers and seminars will be held to facilitate team formation and idea generation. Each team of 3-4 students should preferably consist of 1 or more MSx students and graduate students from the MBA program or other Schools - Engineering, Medicine, Law, Science, Education - to bring diversity and depth to the team. The application-selection process is described on the S321/S322 website.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Rohan, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 325: Starting and Growing a Social Venture

This course is for students who may want to undertake an entrepreneurial career by starting and/or managing a social venture. It covers traditional topics in starting and growing a venture - venture creation, resource acquisition, managing growth and harvest/exit - in the context of social enterprises. It is our view that, in most ways, social ventures should be treated and managed like for-profit ventures, and this course reflects this perspective. That said, there are some important differences which are critical to understand to effectively start and manage a social enterprise. We will highlight these throughout our sessions, so while many of the lessons learned are generalizable to all ventures, we don't advise you to take this class unless you really want to learn about social ventures. All the cases and class discussions will be exclusively about enterprises and organizations in the social venture space.nnThe class deals primarily with situations from the point of view of the ent more »
This course is for students who may want to undertake an entrepreneurial career by starting and/or managing a social venture. It covers traditional topics in starting and growing a venture - venture creation, resource acquisition, managing growth and harvest/exit - in the context of social enterprises. It is our view that, in most ways, social ventures should be treated and managed like for-profit ventures, and this course reflects this perspective. That said, there are some important differences which are critical to understand to effectively start and manage a social enterprise. We will highlight these throughout our sessions, so while many of the lessons learned are generalizable to all ventures, we don't advise you to take this class unless you really want to learn about social ventures. All the cases and class discussions will be exclusively about enterprises and organizations in the social venture space.nnThe class deals primarily with situations from the point of view of the entrepreneur/manager, and in a couple of cases, from the perspective of the investor. Students will have a chance to assess opportunity and action in the context of actual social ventures, often in situations that are current. The course is integrative and will allow students to apply many facets of their business school education. We will have a mixture of case discussions, student-led in-class exercises, panel discussions, and guest speakers.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 328: Startup Garage: Social Ventures Funding Readiness

Social Ventures Funding Readiness is designed as a follow on to the two quarters of the Startup Garage or Entrepreneurial Design for Extreme Affordability experiential learning courses or for Venture Studio residents and is specifically designed for students working on social businesses (nonprofit or for-profit or tbd). Designed for students who already have a solid understanding of the social or environmental need they are trying to address, this course will focus on the business planning needed to launch their venture. In weekly sessions throughout the quarter, teams will work through topics unique to social ventures (e.g. mission, theory of change, impact measurement) as well as topics common to any venture, e.g. product/service market fit, business/economic model, financial planning, early stage financing, logistics, sales/distribution, and board/talent development. Each team will receive significant one-on-one coaching from the instructors, as well as opportunities to share their more »
Social Ventures Funding Readiness is designed as a follow on to the two quarters of the Startup Garage or Entrepreneurial Design for Extreme Affordability experiential learning courses or for Venture Studio residents and is specifically designed for students working on social businesses (nonprofit or for-profit or tbd). Designed for students who already have a solid understanding of the social or environmental need they are trying to address, this course will focus on the business planning needed to launch their venture. In weekly sessions throughout the quarter, teams will work through topics unique to social ventures (e.g. mission, theory of change, impact measurement) as well as topics common to any venture, e.g. product/service market fit, business/economic model, financial planning, early stage financing, logistics, sales/distribution, and board/talent development. Each team will receive significant one-on-one coaching from the instructors, as well as opportunities to share their work with peers and learn from/present to guest speakers. Teams will emerge with a solid business and impact model, ready to raise their first round of seed funding. This course will prepare students for the Stanford Social Innovation Fellowship, Echoing Green, and other similar post-graduate funding opportunities. The course will assume a level of familiarity with key social impact frameworks, so students are encouraged to take another social innovation course or to have prior experience working with mission and theory of change.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 330: Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital: Partnership for Growth

This 3 unit course is a case study based course designed for those students interested in entrepreneurship and/or investing. The partnership (and interaction) between the entrepreneur and the investor is a very important dimension in the growth of many start-ups. This course examines the entrepreneur and investor relationship from both the entrepreneur's and the investor's perspectives.n nFrom the point of view of the entrepreneur -- we look at how an entrepreneur can select the most suitable investor and match the investor to the growth trajectory of their company. Students will learn how and when to approach investors as well as the positioning of their company to the investment firms' portfolio strategy. Each year we have a range in students' entrepreneurial experience and their enthusiasm. Many students begin the course with a business idea (an original idea for this course or a business idea used in another GSB course). Other students will use a "borrowed" business idea from a rec more »
This 3 unit course is a case study based course designed for those students interested in entrepreneurship and/or investing. The partnership (and interaction) between the entrepreneur and the investor is a very important dimension in the growth of many start-ups. This course examines the entrepreneur and investor relationship from both the entrepreneur's and the investor's perspectives.n nFrom the point of view of the entrepreneur -- we look at how an entrepreneur can select the most suitable investor and match the investor to the growth trajectory of their company. Students will learn how and when to approach investors as well as the positioning of their company to the investment firms' portfolio strategy. Each year we have a range in students' entrepreneurial experience and their enthusiasm. Many students begin the course with a business idea (an original idea for this course or a business idea used in another GSB course). Other students will use a "borrowed" business idea from a recent start up to test the waters of the entrepreneurial experience. The course gives all levels of entrepreneurs the opportunity to understand the current investing environment in class and in the field. Students have enjoyed connecting with members of the entrepreneur & VC community as they interact with the guest speakers and complete the course projects.n nFrom the point of view of the investor -- we look at the rapid evolution of the investor sector; in particular, why entrepreneurs have many more investor alternatives today compared to several years ago. It is important for entrepreneurs (and future investors) to understand investors' motivation and process. We will explain how investors are differentiating their firm in an "entrepreneur's market", look for their next opportunity, their investment selection process and how investors plan to work with the entrepreneur after the investment. nnThe course is geared for multiple audiences: the student who is considering an entrepreneurship or investment career path, the student who "experimenting" with entrepreneurship for the first time or the entrepreneur who is seriously exploring a start-up idea (and perhaps has already formed a team). Each student audience will benefit from the candid guest speakers discussion as to what happens behind the scenes (e.g. in the investors' partners meeting) and at the negotiating table between the entrepreneur and investor.nnThe course is case study based with engaging class discussions led by your two teachers who collectively have over 70 years of experience as venture capitalists. The course includes frequent guest speakers (both entrepreneurs and investors) who will give alternate and candid off the record details about their experiences. nnClass participation is integral to a successful exchange of ideas; therefore, we encourage class participation and it will count as 50% of your total grade. The other 50% of the grade is based on individual papers, a short presentation to the class, and your individual contribution to a presentation project to an investor panel. Notably, this year's course allows students to choose their role as the entrepreneur, investor or angel adviser for the final presentation to the VC panel (in contrast to previous years' requirement, this year students will be graded for their individual contribution rather than as a team for the final group project).
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 335: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform

In this course, students will investigate opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurial ventures trying to make a positive impact in public education. The course requires a basic level of understanding of the U.S. K-12 public school system. The first session will analyze the structure of the public education as an industry, with a special emphasis on understanding the achievement gap. Subsequent sessions will explore challenges in increasing efficacy, ensuring financial sustainability, and scaling for entrepreneurs who have sought to change student outcomes, solve pain points, and innovate. The course will feature a variety of ventures (including schools, education technology, training, and supplemental services) and organizational models (for-profit, not-for-profit, and benefit corporation). This course is suitable for students aspiring to be entrepreneurs, leaders in entrepreneurial organizations, leaders in educational organizations, Board members, donors or investors. (Note: this is not a "how-to" course on starting an entrepreneurial venture.)
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Lee, G. (PI)

STRAMGT 340: POWer: Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital from the Perspective of Women

This seminar will showcase women entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. We will explore the challenges and opportunities they encountered in starting and growing their ventures, and the personal and professional choices they have made. The sessions will include cases, readings, videos, panel discussions, role plays and breakout groups with the entrepreneurs and vc¿s. The class will help you understand and build your entrepreneurial and growth mindset. You will leave the class with an individual roadmap and tools to help you be entrepreneurial throughout your career. Men are encouraged to enroll.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 351: Building and Managing Professional Sales Organizations

The focus of this class is on the challenges and key issues associated with the creation and management of a professional sales organization. Our emphasis is developing and managing the selling effort of business-to-business and business-to-consumer capital goods and services. There will be relatively little emphasis on sales technique (i.e., students should not expect a course on "How to be a Better Salesperson"). The course is organized to follow the development of the sales function from strategic inception through to execution and implementation: choosing a go-to-market model (e.g., direct sales, no/low touch, VARs, OEMs, hybrid models); building and structuring the sales organization (e.g., sales learning curve, organizational structure, allocating territories and quotas); and managing the sales force (e.g., hiring/firing, compensation, forecasting, culture). We will address these topics in the context of both early stage ventures and later stage enterprises.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 353: Entrepreneurship: Formation of New Ventures

This course is offered for students who at some time may want to undertake an entrepreneurial career by pursuing opportunities leading to partial or full ownership and control of a business. The course deals with case situations from the point of view of the entrepreneur/manager rather than the passive investor. Many cases involve visitors, since the premise is that opportunity and action have large idiosyncratic components. Students must assess opportunity and action in light of the perceived capabilities of the individuals and the nature of the environments they face. The course is integrative and will allow students to apply many facets of their business school education. Each section will have a specific focus, please select the instructor(s) with your interests: Leslie, Bowman - High tech ventures; Ellis, Saloner - Diverse types of ventures; Foster, Brady - Diverse types of ventures; Reiss, Chess - Very early stage ventures.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 354: Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital

Many of America's most successful entrepreneurial companies have been substantially influenced by professionally managed venture capital. This relationship is examined from both the entrepreneur's and the venture capitalist's perspective. From the point of view of the entrepreneur, the course considers how significant business opportunities are identified, planned, and built into real companies; how resources are matched with opportunity; and how, within this framework, entrepreneurs seek capital and other assistance from venture capitalists or other sources. From the point of view of the venture capitalist, the course considers how potential entrepreneurial investments are evaluated, valued, structured, and enhanced; how different venture capital strategies are deployed; and how venture capitalists raise and manage their own funds. The course includes a term-long project where students work in teams (4-5 students per team) to write a business plan (or a business model canvas) for a venture of the team's choosing.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 355: Managing Growing Enterprises

This course is offered for students who, in the near term, aspire to the management and full or partial ownership of a new or newly-acquired business. The seminar, which is limited to 45 students, has a strong implementation focus, and deals in some depth with certain selected, generic entrepreneurial issues, viewed from the perspective of the owner/manager. Broad utilization is made of case materials, background readings, visiting experts, and role playing. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the application of analytical tools to administrative practice.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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