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831 - 840 of 926 results for: all courses

SOC 108: Political & Historical Sociology (SOC 208)

The differences between historical and sociological analysis of past events. The difference between constructing sociological explanations and describing past events. Topics include: the rise of Christianity, the mafia in a Sicilian village, the trade network of the East India Company.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 114: Economic Sociology (SOC 214)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 115: Topics in Economic Sociology

How does a corporation¿s practice of religion affect your employment? How do your personal data become a corporation's private property? How does corporate behavior reinforce the marginalization of certain populations? The answers to these questions have varied as society's conceptualization of corporations evolved from simple, legal fiction to rights and responsibilities similar to those of humans. In this seminar, we critically examine relationships between corporations and citizens, and analyze the idea of corporation as citizen. Through careful reading, discussion, reflection, and writing, you will understand how corporations are socially constructed and in turn regulate social behavior. We will empower each other to thoughtfully question and possibly change our relationships with these major actors in economic sociology.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 117A: China Under Mao (SOC 217A)

(Graduate students register for 217A.) The transformation of Chinese society from the 1949 revolution to the eve of China's reforms in 1978: creation of a socialist economy, reorganization of rural society and urban workplaces, emergence of new inequalities of power and opportunity, and new forms of social conflict during Mao's Cultural Revolution of 1966-69 and its aftermath.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 119D: The Power of Social Networks in Everyday Life

Why do some people have better ideas than others? Why are some more likely to be bullied in school, get a job, or catch a disease? Why do some innovations, apps, rumors, or revolutions spread like a wildfire, while others never get off the ground? Why are Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Spotify so good at recommending people, news, pictures, or songs we might know or like? What do a power outage, the collapse of the Roman Empire, a human stroke, and the Financial Crisis of 2008 have in common? What explains the success of Silicon Valley? And why are there only six (or less) people between us and any other human on this planet? While these questions may seem totally unrelated to each other on first glance, they can all be explored with the help of a single, yet powerful framework: social network analysis. In this class, you will learn to see the world as a web of relations: not only are people, ideas/concepts and things all increasingly connected to each other; the pattern of these rela more »
Why do some people have better ideas than others? Why are some more likely to be bullied in school, get a job, or catch a disease? Why do some innovations, apps, rumors, or revolutions spread like a wildfire, while others never get off the ground? Why are Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Spotify so good at recommending people, news, pictures, or songs we might know or like? What do a power outage, the collapse of the Roman Empire, a human stroke, and the Financial Crisis of 2008 have in common? What explains the success of Silicon Valley? And why are there only six (or less) people between us and any other human on this planet? While these questions may seem totally unrelated to each other on first glance, they can all be explored with the help of a single, yet powerful framework: social network analysis. In this class, you will learn to see the world as a web of relations: not only are people, ideas/concepts and things all increasingly connected to each other; the pattern of these relations can tell us a great deal about many phenomena in our social world that defy traditional explanations. At the end of this class, you will not only see networks everywhere; you will have taken a big step toward connecting some of the dots in (y)our world: this is the power of thinking in relations.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hahn, M. (PI)

SOC 122D: Free speech and the university: As simple as fascists vs. snowflakes? (AMSTUD 122D)

This course uses readings from sociology, political science, and legal/ethical reasoning to elucidate the larger structures and ideals that are at stake in the debates over what kind of speech is tolerable ¿ or normatively speaking, desirable ¿ at colleges and universities. Students will achieve a greater understanding of: free speech¿s role in American society and democracy, how America¿s position on free speech compares to other countries, and how speech restriction and liberties can reveal larger patterns in structure and agency
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Boch, A. (PI)

SOC 130: Education and Society (EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ramirez, F. (PI)

SOC 133D: Globalization and Social Change

This course will explore the topic of globalization as an economic, political, cultural, and social process that has shaped an increasingly interconnected world. How do we make sense of a world that is becoming increasingly interconnected, and where social problems are increasingly global in their scope? How have international institutions attempted to regulate these processes and maintain social order? How has globalization affected economic and social inequalities, democratization, and culture and identity, at both the national and international levels? We will draw on a wide range of theories and interdisciplinary research in the social sciences to understand the multidimensional nature of these processes of globalization.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Furuta, J. (PI)

SOC 134: Gender and Education in Global and Comparative Perspectives (EDUC 197, FEMGEN 297)

Theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to the role of education in changing, modifying, or reproducing structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Cross-national research on the status of girls and women and the role of development organizations and processes. As class meets just nine times, attendance at the first class meeting is required and no more than one absence is allowed in order to pass.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wotipka, C. (PI)

SOC 134D: The Sociology of Sex, Relationships, and Family

How people meet, who they date, and when they settle down have all changed dramatically in recent decades. This course will provide students with a thorough overview of demographic and sociological perspectives on sex, relationships, and family in the United States. Students will become familiar with the empirical patterns and trends, political and cultural debates, and policy issues concerning historical and modern romantic and sexual relationships ¿ as well as the major theories and research methods used in the sociological study of relationships. Throughout the course, we will explore how changes in modern relationships may affect broader patterns of social inequality and family structure. Additionally, we will examine how the mate selection process intersects with various aspects of technology, gender, class, race, and sexuality
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Orth, T. (PI)
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