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11 - 20 of 871 results for: all courses

AFRICAAM 81: Media Representations of Africa (AFRICAST 81, AFRICAST 181)

How has Africa been dominantly represented in the media? How are these representations challenged, complexified and reproduced in the postcolonial context? What is the role of African media in these processes? This class is an introduction to the variety of roles played by the media in representing Africa, with a particular focus on the postcolonial context. The topic is particularly relevant to contemporary Africa as the emerging middle-class, economic and cultural globalization, and the uptake for communication technologies are shaping contested images of the continent. You will: develop a theoretical and empirical understanding of the media as instruments of domination but also of resistance; learn how to critically deconstruct media representations in everyday life; understand the challenges of intercultural communication in an unequal world. Key concepts such as: representation, stereotyping, cultural appropriation, afropessimism, afrocentrism, afro optimism, afropolitanism. Readings drawn from media and cultural studies, anthropology, postcolonial theory and literature. In class-analysis of photographs, news articles and broadcasts, PR campaigns, social media, films and documentaries.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Nothias, T. (PI)

AFRICAAM 102: Shaping & Contesting the Past in Public Spaces (CSRE 201, HISTORY 201)

Gateway course for Public History/Public Service track. Examines various ways history is used outside of the classroom, and its role in political/cultural debates in the U.S. and abroad. Showcases careers in public history with guest speakers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

AFRICAAM 107D: Rise and Fall of Atlantic Slavery, 1500 to 1900 (HISTORY 7D, HISTORY 107D)

Between 1500 and 1900, about 12 million people were forcibly removed from Africa and transported to the Americas to work as slaves. This course explores the history of racial slavery in the Atlantic world and its lasting significance. Topics include the Middle Passage, the development of racism, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the slave experience, resistance, African-American cultures, abolitionism, the process of emancipation, reparations, and the perpetuation of slavery and other forms of unfree labor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 111: AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa (AFRICAST 112, AFRICAST 212)

Is foreign aid a solution? or a problem? Should there be more aid, less aid, or none at all? How do foreign aid and local initiatives intersect? A clinic in Uganda that addresses AIDS as a family and community problem. Multiple strategies in Tanzania to increase girls' schooling. These are imaginative and innovative approaches to pressing and contested policy challenges. We will examine several contentious issues in contemporary Africa, exploring their roots and the intense conflicts they engender, with special attention to foreign aid and the aid relationship. As African communities and countries work to shape their future, what are the foreign roles and what are their consequences?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Samoff, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 120F: Buying Black: Economic Sovereignty, Race, and Entrepreneurship in the USA (ANTHRO 120F, CSRE 120F)

This seminar examines how communities of color have critiqued and transformed capitalism in America through concepts of economic independence, entrepreneurship, and sovereignty. By tracing concepts such as the double-duty dollar, casino/tribal capitalisms, retail boycotts, and buying black, the course traces ethnic entrepreneurialism in America. Students will also consider the international context of such US-based movements, particularly in relation to American imperialism and global supply-chain capitalism.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AFRICAAM 125V: The Voting Rights Act (CSRE 125V, POLISCI 125V)

Focus is on whether and how racial and ethnic minorities including African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos are able to organize and press their demands on the political system. Topics include the political behavior of minority citizens, the strength and effect of these groups at the polls, the theory and practice of group formation among minorities, the responsiveness of elected officials, and the constitutional obstacles and issues that shape these phenomena.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 132: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health (HUMBIO 122S)

Examines health disparities in the U.S., looking at the patterns of those disparities and their root causes. Explores the intersection of lower social class and ethnic minority status in affecting health status and access to health care. Compares social and biological conceptualizations of race and ethnicity. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

AFRICAAM 135A: Islam in America (AMSTUD 135X, CSRE 135, GLOBAL 137, RELIGST 135)

This course explores the history of Islam in North America with special emphasis on the experience of Muslims in the United States. Contrary to popularly held belief, Muslims have been critical participants in the construction of American identity from the 16th century onwards when Muslim slaves were forcibly brought to Colonial America. Our course will explore the diverse ways Muslims in America have imagined, practiced, and negotiated their religious identity. We will move chronologically, and we will focus upon three crucial themes: the convergence of constructions of racial, religious, and national identities in America; the ever-shifting terrain of notions of authority and authenticity amongst Muslims in America; and global resonances of the practices and ideas of American Muslims.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Morgan, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 144: Living Free: Embodying Healing and Creativity in The Era of Racial Justice Movements (CSRE 44)

What does it mean to live free? It is often said that the one demand for the Movement for Black Lives is to "stop killing us." This demand has led Black artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodies. This surge of creativity has impacted and intersected with work happening in queer and trans communities and in many other communities of color, including indigenous movements for safe and clean water, student protests against campus racism, the undocumented movement, prison abolition among others.  This justice based work urges us to interrupt systems of violence with systems of healing that recover traditions, invent new modalities, and connect to survival practices developed by many generations of people in community.nnIn this course we will bring together leading artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodie more »
What does it mean to live free? It is often said that the one demand for the Movement for Black Lives is to "stop killing us." This demand has led Black artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodies. This surge of creativity has impacted and intersected with work happening in queer and trans communities and in many other communities of color, including indigenous movements for safe and clean water, student protests against campus racism, the undocumented movement, prison abolition among others.  This justice based work urges us to interrupt systems of violence with systems of healing that recover traditions, invent new modalities, and connect to survival practices developed by many generations of people in community.nnIn this course we will bring together leading artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodies, land, and natural resources. In this course we ask: what does it mean to embody health? How can we shift frameworks of pathology into frameworks of wholeness? What practices can we develop, recover, and share that help us create systems that support and value equity, healing and creativity for communities most at risk? And finally, how can we all live free?
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Holt, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 145B: Africa in the 20th Century (HISTORY 145B)

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Getz, T. (PI)
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