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1 - 10 of 28 results for: COMM ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMM 104W: Reporting, Writing, and Understanding the News

Techniques of news reporting and writing. The value and role of news in democratic societies. Gateway class to journalism. Prerequisite for all COMM 177/277 classes. Limited enrollment. Preference to COMM majors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 125: Perspectives on American Journalism (COMM 225)

(Graduate students register for COMM 225.) An examination of the practice of American journalism, focusing on the political, social, cultural, economic and technological forces that have shaped the U. S. press since the early 1800s. Aimed at consumers as well as producers of news, the objective of this course is to provide a framework and vocabulary for judging the value and quality of everyday journalism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Glasser, T. (PI)

COMM 169: Computers and Interfaces (COMM 269)

(Graduate students register for COMM 269.) Interdisciplinary. Interdisciplinary. User responses to interfaces and design implications of those responses. Theories from different disciplines illustrate cognitive, emotional, and social responses to textual, voice-based, pictorial, metaphoric, conversational, adaptive, agent-based, intelligent, and anthropomorphic interfaces. Group design project applying theory to the design of an interactive interface.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 183: Social Media Literacies (COMM 283)

Today's personal, social, political, economic worlds are all affected by digital media and networked publics: viral videos, uprisings from Tahrir to #OWS, free search engines, abundant inaccuracy and sophisticated disinformation online, indelible, and searchable digital footprints, laptops in lecture halls and BlackBerries at the dinner table, 20-something social media billionaires, massive online university courses. Introduction to the literature about and direct experience of these new literacies: research foundations and practical methods to control attention, attitudes and tools necessary for critical consumption of information, best practices of individual digital participation and collective participatory culture, the use of collaborative media and methodologies, and the application of network know-how to life online. Contrasting perspectives through readings and classroom and online discussion. Students collaborate and cooperate in their learning during and between classes through small group discussions and face to face exercises, forums, blogs, mindmaps and wikis. Prerequisite: instructor consent. See http://comm.stanford.edu/faculty-rheingold/ for application instructions; contact instructor at howard@rheingold.com.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 225: Perspectives on American Journalism (COMM 125)

(Graduate students register for COMM 225.) An examination of the practice of American journalism, focusing on the political, social, cultural, economic and technological forces that have shaped the U. S. press since the early 1800s. Aimed at consumers as well as producers of news, the objective of this course is to provide a framework and vocabulary for judging the value and quality of everyday journalism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 269: Computers and Interfaces (COMM 169)

(Graduate students register for COMM 269.) Interdisciplinary. Interdisciplinary. User responses to interfaces and design implications of those responses. Theories from different disciplines illustrate cognitive, emotional, and social responses to textual, voice-based, pictorial, metaphoric, conversational, adaptive, agent-based, intelligent, and anthropomorphic interfaces. Group design project applying theory to the design of an interactive interface.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 283: Social Media Literacies (COMM 183)

Today's personal, social, political, economic worlds are all affected by digital media and networked publics: viral videos, uprisings from Tahrir to #OWS, free search engines, abundant inaccuracy and sophisticated disinformation online, indelible, and searchable digital footprints, laptops in lecture halls and BlackBerries at the dinner table, 20-something social media billionaires, massive online university courses. Introduction to the literature about and direct experience of these new literacies: research foundations and practical methods to control attention, attitudes and tools necessary for critical consumption of information, best practices of individual digital participation and collective participatory culture, the use of collaborative media and methodologies, and the application of network know-how to life online. Contrasting perspectives through readings and classroom and online discussion. Students collaborate and cooperate in their learning during and between classes through small group discussions and face to face exercises, forums, blogs, mindmaps and wikis. Prerequisite: instructor consent. See http://comm.stanford.edu/faculty-rheingold/ for application instructions; contact instructor at howard@rheingold.com.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 86SI: College Media Lab: digital and reporting skills for student journalists

Journalism, especially college journalism, is undergoing rapid change in the 21st century. As native digital users, we are uniquely positioned to create and innovate in the new media landscape. This class is designed to provide students with a hands-on education in digitally-fluent college media reporting. Topics include photo, video and data reporting, media rights and responsibilities, and communications careers outside of journalism. The 'basics' of writing, blogging, and reporting the news will be taught and applied throughout the quarter. Guest lectures from professional reporters, academics, and communications professionals. Work completed for this class can be submitted to The Stanford Daily for publication. Pizza provided.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hamilton, J. (PI)

COMM 122: Content Analysis: Studying Communication Artifacts (COMM 222)

An empirical and systematic investigation of documented messages in print, graphical, and audio-visual forms and observed human communication behaviors. Focuses on the design and execution of content analytic studies, including manifest vs. latent content, measurement issues, reliability and validity assessment, computer text analysis, and traditional human-coder techniques. Prerequisite: junior, senior or grad standing; COMM 106/206 or an equivalent course in basic social science research. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Voelker, D. (PI)

COMM 177C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Environmental Journalism (COMM 277C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C, ENVRES 277C)

(Graduate students register for COMM / ENVRES 277C.) Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive course in science-based environmental journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about environmental issues and science, how to assess the quality and relevance of environmental news, how to cover the environment and science beats effectively, and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Limited enrollment: preference to journalism students and students in the natural and environmental sciences. Prerequisite: COMM 104, ENVRES 200 or consent of instructor. Admissions by application only, available from thayden@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hayden, T. (PI)
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