2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

211 - 220 of 265 results for: all courses

OBGYN 81Q: Perspectives on the Abortion Experience in Western Fiction

Explores the role of media in delivering abortion-related messages as well as the broader questions of how abortion and related issues are fundamentally integrated into the social fabric of US and global societies. Abortion remains one of the most controversial and polarizing challenges of our time. Yet, it has been a clinical, social, political, and cultural fact in a broad swath of societies for centuries. As is common for such lightning rod issues, the topic of abortion has featured prominently in novels and films. Each treatment provides a unique perspective on at least one aspect of abortion, whether it be clinical, social, political or cultural. How abortion is portrayed in novels and films provides the student of history, anthropology, and biology with insights into the author's or director's perspectives, and into societal attitudes and mores.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ORTHO 97Q: Sport, Exercise, and Health: Exploring Sports Medicine

Preference to sophomores. Sports medicine is the practice of clinical medicine at the interface between health and performance, competition and well-being. While sports medicine had its origins in providing care to athletes, medical advances developed in care of athletes exerted a great effect on the nature and quality of care to the broader community. Topics include sports injuries, medical conditions associated with sport and exercise, ethics, coaching, women's issues, fitness and health, and sports science. Case studies.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hwang, C. (PI)

PATH 103Q: Lymphocyte Migration

Preference to sophomores. Lymphocytes migrate from blood vessels into tissues to participate in immune surveillance and the development of inflammation. The lymphocyte and blood vessel endothelia molecules that control lymphocyte migration, and are implicated in the development of human diseases such as asthma, type 1 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis are discussed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Michie, S. (PI)

PEDS 65N: Understanding Children's Health Disparities

The social and economic factors that affect children and their health status. The principal sources of disparities in the health of children in the U.S. are not biologic, but social and economic. Topics include ethnic, cultural, and behavioral factors that affect children's health, both directly and indirectly; lack of health insurance; and current proposals for health care reform, focusing specifically on how they will impact existing health disparities among children.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

PHIL 4N: Knowing Nothing

Our beliefs are subject to multiple sources of error: a traveler's perception of an oasis in the desert may turn out to be a mirage; the key witness in a trial criminal may turn out to be lying; or a fluke in the data may mislead a research team into believing a false hypothesis; or a miscalculating math student may end up with the wrong answer. Philosophers often characterize knowledge as belief that is safe from error--but is knowledge possible? This course uses the philosophical arguments and thought experiments to assess the question of how much we can hope to know.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Briggs, R. (PI)

PHIL 7N: Philosophy and Science Fiction

What if things had been otherwise? What if things are someday, somewhere, very different than they are here and now? Science fiction and other genre fiction gives us the opportunity to explore worlds that stretch our conceptions of reality, of what it is to have a mind, to be human, and to communicate with one another. This course examines central questions in philosophy through the lens of speculative fiction. Can there be freedom in a deterministic world? How could language and communication evolve? What is a mind, and what is the nature of experience? How can we know what the world is like? We¿ll read classical and contemporary papers in philosophy alongside short stories, novels, and movies that play the role of thought experiments in illuminating philosophical issues.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Cao, R. (PI)

PHIL 11N: Skepticism

Preference to freshmen. Historical and contemporary philosophical perspectives on the limits of human knowledge of a mind-independent world and causal laws of nature. The nature and possibility of a priori knowledge. Skepticism regarding religious beliefs..
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PHYSICS 12N: Black Holes: Fact and Fancy

Black Holes have been observed throughout the universe using radio waves, light, X- and gamma-rays and now with gravitational radiation. They are well-described using Einstein's theory of relativity and provide dramatic demonstrations of how physicists think about matter, energy, space, and time. They have also stimulated much science fiction. This seminar is intended primarily for non-science freshmen who should learn how some really big ideas were developed, debated, and then demonstrated to be correct. Movies and popular books will be critiqued and used to illustrate basic properties of black holes. Special attention will be paid to understanding what it takes for an interesting idea to become accepted or rejected as scientific fact. There will be visits to Stanford labs where instruments used to observe black holes were conceived, constructed and combined.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 14N: Quantum Information: Visions and Emerging Technologies

What sets quantum information apart from its classical counterpart is that it can be encoded non-locally, woven into correlations among multiple qubits in a phenomenon known as entanglement. We will discuss paradigms for harnessing entanglement to solve hitherto intractable computational problems or to push the precision of sensors to their fundamental quantum mechanical limits. We will also examine challenges that physicists and engineers are tackling in the laboratory today to enable the quantum technologies of the future.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 18N: Frontiers in Theoretical Physics and Cosmology

Preference to freshmen. The course will begin with a description of the current standard models of gravitation, cosmology, and elementary particle physics. We will then focus on frontiers of current understanding including investigations of very early universe cosmology, string theory, and the physics of black holes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints