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FEMGEN 63N: The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality (AMSTUD 63N, CSRE 63N, HISTORY 63N)

This course explores the long history of ideas about gender and equality. Each week we read, dissect, compare, and critique a set of primary historical documents (political and literary) from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. We tease out changing arguments about education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, politics, and the very meaning of gender, and we place feminist critics within national and global political contexts.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

FEMGEN 86Q: Love as a Force for Social Justice (HUMBIO 86Q)

Preference to sophomores. Biological, psychological, religious, social and cultural perspectives on the concept of agape love. How love is conceptualized across cultures; agape love as the basis of many religions; different kinds of love; the biology of love; love in action for social justice; the languages of love, including art, literature, music, and poetry. Emphasis is on blog writing, participation, and oral presentation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Murray, A. (PI)

FEMGEN 188Q: Imagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person (CSRE 188Q)

Gender roles, gender relations and sexual identity explored in contemporary literature and conversation with guest authors. Weekly meetings designated for book discussion and meeting with authors. Interest in writing and a curiosity about diverse women's lives would be helpful to students. Students will use such tools as close reading, research, analysis and imagination. Seminar requires strong voice of all participants. Oral presentations, discussion papers, final projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Miner, V. (PI)

FILMSTUD 50Q: The Video Essay: Writing with Video about Film and Media

In this course, we will explore what it means to write with video, and we will learn to make effective and engaging video essays about historical and contemporary audiovisual media. Specifically, we will examine formal, aesthetic, and rhetorical strategies for communicating in the medium of video, and we will conduct a series of hands-on exercises utilizing digital video editing software to construct arguments, analyses, and interpretations of film and other media (including television, video games, and online media). Compared with traditional, text-based engagements, the video essay offers a remarkably direct mode of communicating critical and analytical ideas. In this medium, authors no longer struggle to describe audiovisual contents in words that can never do justice to the rich array of details that are immediately apparent to spectators eyes and ears; instead, video essayists can simply show their viewers what they want them to see. This does not mean, however, that it is any eas more »
In this course, we will explore what it means to write with video, and we will learn to make effective and engaging video essays about historical and contemporary audiovisual media. Specifically, we will examine formal, aesthetic, and rhetorical strategies for communicating in the medium of video, and we will conduct a series of hands-on exercises utilizing digital video editing software to construct arguments, analyses, and interpretations of film and other media (including television, video games, and online media). Compared with traditional, text-based engagements, the video essay offers a remarkably direct mode of communicating critical and analytical ideas. In this medium, authors no longer struggle to describe audiovisual contents in words that can never do justice to the rich array of details that are immediately apparent to spectators eyes and ears; instead, video essayists can simply show their viewers what they want them to see. This does not mean, however, that it is any easier to write effectively with video than it is to compose an essay with pen and paper. Similar types of expository and argumentative planning are involved in both forms, while the new technology introduces its own characteristic challenges and choices, including decisions about the spatial and temporal organization and transformation of audiovisual materials, the addition of onscreen text, voiceover commentary, and visual effects. By taking a hands-on approach, we will develop our skills with editing software such as Adobe Premiere Pro and Apple's Final Cut Pro while also cultivating our awareness of the formal and narrative techniques employed in films and other moving-image media. Through weekly assignments and group critique sessions, we will learn to express ourselves more effectively and creatively in audiovisual media. As a culmination of our efforts, we will assemble a group exhibition of our best video essays for public display on campus.nNo previous experience is required, but a willingness to learn new technologies (in particular, video editing software) is important.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Denson, S. (PI)

FRENCH 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (ITALIAN 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

FRENCH 87N: The New Wave: How The French Reinvented Cinema

Focus on the French New Wave's cinematic revolution of 1959-1962. In a few years, the Nouvelle Vague delivered landmark works such as Truffaut's 400 Blows, Godard's Breathless, Chabro's Le Beau Serge or Resnais' Hiroshima mon amour, and changed forever the way we make and think about movies. Why did these films look so radically fresh? What do they say about France's youth culture in the early 60s? How is the author's theory behind them still influencing us today? Focus is on cultural history, aesthetic analysis, interpretation of narrative, sound and visual forms. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Alduy, C. (PI)

GENE 104Q: Law and the Biosciences

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on human genetics; also assisted reproduction and neuroscience. Topics include forensic use of DNA, genetic testing, genetic discrimination, eugenics, cloning, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, neuroscientific methods of lie detection, and genetic or neuroscience enhancement. Student presentations on research paper conclusions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Greely, H. (PI)

GEOPHYS 20N: Predicting Volcanic Eruptions

The physics and chemistry of volcanic processes and modern methods of volcano monitoring. Volcanoes as manifestations of the Earth's internal energy and hazards to society. How earth scientists better forecast eruptive activity by monitoring seismic activity, bulging of the ground surface, and the discharge of volcanic gases, and by studying deposits from past eruptions. Focus is on the interface between scientists and policy makers and the challenges of decision making with incomplete information. Field trip to Mt. St. Helens, site of the 1980 eruption.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Segall, P. (PI)

GEOPHYS 54N: The Space Mission to Europa

Jupiter's icy moon Europa is a leading candidate in the search for life in our solar system outside of Earth. NASA's upcoming Europa Clipper mission would investigate the habitability of the moon using a suite of nine geophysical instruments. In this course, we will use the mission as a central text around which to explore the intersection of science, engineering, management, economics, culture, and politics involved in any modern big science enterprise.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GEOPHYS 60N: Man versus Nature: Coping with Disasters Using Space Technology (EE 60N)

Preference to freshman. Natural hazards, earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, hurricanes, and fires, and how they affect people and society; great disasters such as asteroid impacts that periodically obliterate many species of life. Scientific issues, political and social consequences, costs of disaster mitigation, and how scientific knowledge affects policy. How spaceborne imaging technology makes it possible to respond quickly and mitigate consequences; how it is applied to natural disasters; and remote sensing data manipulation and analysis. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Zebker, H. (PI)
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