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1 - 10 of 75 results for: MATSCI

MATSCI 10SC: Diamonds from Peanut Butter: Material Technologies and Human History

Technological importance of materials in history is captured in names: the Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age, and now the Information Age or the Silicon Age. How materials have played, and continue to play, pivotal roles in the development of new technologies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MATSCI 81N: Bioengineering Materials to Heal the Body

Preference to freshmen. Real-world examples of materials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies. How scientists and engineers design new materials for surgeons to use in replacing body parts such as damaged heart or spinal cord tissue. How cells interact with implanted materials. Students identify a clinically important disease or injury that requires a better material, proposed research approaches to the problem, and debate possible engineering solutions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 82N: Science of the Impossible

Imagine a world where cancer is cured with light, objects can be made invisible, and teleportation is allowed through space and time. The future once envisioned by science fiction writers is now becoming a reality, thanks to advances in materials science and engineering. This seminar will explore 'impossible' technologies - those that have shaped our past and those that promise to revolutionize the future. Attention will be given to both the science and the societal impact of these technologies. We will begin by investigating breakthroughs from the 20th century that seemed impossible in the early 1900s, such as the invention of integrated circuits and the discovery of chemotherapy. We will then discuss the scientific breakthroughs that enabled modern 'impossible' science, such as photodynamic cancer therapeutics, invisibility, and psychokinesis through advanced mind-machine interfaces. Lastly, we will explore technologies currently perceived as completely impossible and brainstorm the breakthroughs needed to make such science fiction a reality. The course will include introductory lectures and in-depth conversations based on readings. Students will also be given the opportunity to lead class discussions on a relevant 'impossible science' topic of their choosing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dionne, J. (PI)

MATSCI 83N: Great Inventions That Matter

This introductory seminar starts by illuminating on the general aspects of creativity, invention, and patenting in engineering and medicine, and how Stanford University is one of the world's foremost engines of innovation. We then take a deep dive into some great technological inventions which are still playing an essential role in our everyday lives, such as fiber amplifier, digital compass, computer memory, HIV detector, personal genome machine, cancer cell sorting, brain imaging, and mind reading. The stories and underlying materials and technologies behind each invention, including a few examples by Stanford faculty and student inventors, are highlighted and discussed. A special lecture focuses on the public policy on intellectual properties (IP) and the resources at Stanford Office of Technology Licensing (OTL). Each student will have an opportunity to present on a great invention from Stanford (or elsewhere), or to write a (mock) patent disclosure of his/her own ideas.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MATSCI 84N: Re-engineering the energy landscape

Why hasn't electricity from solar panels, wind turbines, and other environmentally friendly resources taken over our energy landscape? Why is a hybrid car or an all-electric vehicle so expansive? In this seminar we will explore energy technologies and focus on how development in materials science enables a greener future. This seminar takes a hands-on approach; we will make solar cells and batteries and generate our own electricity. We will also include field trips to companies running large-scale energy production and green energy for transportation. Lastly we will explore advanced energy materials research at Stanford and find what still needs to be done in order to achieve a sustainable energy landscape.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Melosh, N. (PI)

MATSCI 100: Undergraduate Independent Study

Independent study in materials science under supervision of a faculty member.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 150: Undergraduate Research

Participation in a research project.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MATSCI 151: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties (MATSCI 251)

Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 152: Electronic Materials Engineering

Materials science and engineering for electronic device applications. Kinetic molecular theory and thermally activated processes; band structure; electrical conductivity of metals and semiconductors; intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors; elementary p-n junction theory; operating principles of light emitting diodes, solar cells, thermoelectric coolers, and transistors. Semiconductor processing including crystal growth, ion implantation, thin film deposition, etching, lithography, and nanomaterials synthesis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 153: Nanostructure and Characterization

Students will study the theory and application of characterization techniques used to examine the structure of materials at the nanoscale. Students will learn to classify the structure of materials such as semiconductors, ceramics, metals, and nanotubes according to the principles of crystallography. Methods used widely in academic and industrial research, including X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, will be demonstrated along with their application to the analysis of nanostructures. Prerequisites: E-50 or equivalent introductory materials science course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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