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1 - 10 of 636 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 1A: Global History: The Ancient World (CLASSICS 76)

World history from the origins of humanity to the Black Death. Focuses on the evolution of complex societies, wealth, violence, and hierarchy, emphasizing the three great turning points in early history: the evolution of modern humans, the agricultural revolution, and the rise of the state.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 1C: Global History: The Modern Age

This course explores the heterogeneous forces that have shaped our modern world. Analyzing a variety of documents and sources, including memoirs, novels, and films, we will investigate how key political ideas have transformed societies, cultures, and economies across the globe from the late eighteenth century through to the present.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 3: The Historical and Geographical Background of Current Global Events

This one-unit lecture course aims to provide the historical and geographical context necessary for understanding the most important global issues of the day. Weekly lectures will explore two or more major issues in some detail, illustrating them with maps, timelines, photographs, and other images. Topics are not planned in advance, but will instead reflect stories currently in the news.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 3A: Making Palestine Visible (COMPLIT 42, CSRE 3A)

The course will discuss topics that inform the debate over Israel-Palestine. We will address common misperceptions, key themes, concepts, and issues and present information aimed at helping students understand the complex history and array of contemporary political, cultural and legal structures at play and how they tend to render Palestinian claims to rights illegible for much of the American public. This learning experience, incorporating discussion and clarification at its core, connects with the national and Stanford campus discussion of activism on Israel-Palestine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 3B: Trans History: The Long View (FEMGEN 3B)

This mini-course explores the history of gender crossing and transgressions, broadly defined. A series of Stanford faculty and one visitor will present historical interpretations of who, why, and how individuals have crossed gender boundaries, as well as how different societies have reacted to gender crossing. The topics range across time from medieval to modern times and across geographic regions from Europe, China, and Iran to the Americas. Short reading assignments will be made available for each class meeting; students must attend all five sessions, complete the readings, and write a summary paper to receive one unit of credit for the series.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 3C: Talking About Jews (JEWISHST 3C)

Professors Beinin and Zipperstein will initiate discussions on a broad range of topics related to Jews and Jewish identity in the modern world and then invite the class to join in the discussion. Topics include: Who are the Jews, secularism, Jewish capitalists and leftists, anti-Semitism, Israel and Zionism, Jews in American life. For the one unit option attendance at the discussions is required. For the three unit option, students will do the prescribed readings and attend a discussion section.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 3D: DANGEROUS IDEAS (ARTHIST 36, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as equality, progress, and tradition have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like freedom of the press, fact versus fiction, and citizenship play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Satz, D. (PI)

HISTORY 3E: Michelle Obama in American Culture (AFRICAAM 3E, AMSTUD 3E, CSRE 3E, FEMGEN 3E)

Never before has the United States had a First Lady like Michelle Obama. During her eight years in the White House, Michelle Obama transformed traditional meanings of womanhood, marriage, motherhood, and style and created new possibilities for what it means to be strong and what it means to be beautiful. No First Lady has ever been so scrutinized but also so beloved: from her J. Crew dresses to her Let's Move campaign, from her vegetable gardens to her chiseled arms, and from her powerful speeches to her casual and always authentic personality. This class examines the impact on American culture of the most popular First Lady in American history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 4: Introduction to Geospatial Humanities (HISTORY 104)

This course introduces undergraduate students to the theory and methods of the geospatial humanities, understood broadly as the application of GIS techniques and other quantitative methods in the humanistic study of social and cultural patterns in past and present settings.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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