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1 - 10 of 57 results for: DLCL

DLCL 1: CSN Undergraduate Colloquium (ENGLISH 1)

This colloquium is intended for undergraduates who are interested in the history and theory of the novel, and who would like to attend the Center for the Study of the Novel's (CSN) annual conference. Before the conference, students will meet with CSN's graduate student staff, to read and discuss a small number of key texts by participating scholars, whose presentations students will then attend. After the conference, the colloquium will meet again, to discuss both the readings and conference papers, and explore their broader implications for the study of the novel. Attendance at both meetings of the colloquium, and at least one panel at the conference, is required for course credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: McGurl, M. (PI)

DLCL 11: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, The Ancient World (CLASSICS 37)

This course will journey through ancient literature from Homer to St. Augustine; it will introduce participants to some of its fascinating features and big ideas; and it will reflect on questions such as: What is a good life, a good society? Who is in and who is out and why? What is the meaning of honor, and should it be embraced or feared? Where does human subjectivity fit into a world of matter, cause and effect? When is rebellion justified? What happens when a way of life or thought is upended? Do we have any duties to the past?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

DLCL 12: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Medieval to Early Modern (ENGLISH 112A, FRENCH 12)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? The second quarter focuses on the transition from the Middle Ages to Modernity, Europe's re-acquaintance with classical antiquity and its first contacts with the New World. Authors include Dante, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Cervantes, and Milton.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 13: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern (FRENCH 13, PHIL 13)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 50: Humanities House student research workshop

For Humanities House student research workshops.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hicks, L. (PI)

DLCL 53: Designing a Life in the Humanities: History, Literature, Print, Art, Film, Community, and Service

This short intensive seminar features Humanities Scholar & Artist in Residence, Clare Whistler, (visiting from England, April 13-27,) will meet for dialogue, workshop, and, for those interested, performance. In order to design a life that integrates meaning and purpose through the Humanities, it is helpful to think in terms of projects, research, collaborations, explorations, locations, and relationships. In five residence based sessions, students will discover personal and professional practices to design and support a life in the humanities, including practical matters: grant proposal writing, gaining non-profit status, creating a Humanities "start up," as well as partnering with investors, foundations, fundraisers, patrons, and community. . This course will be of interest to students who would like to maintain the values of the humanities, make a decent living, find good mentors and collaborators, and give back to the community.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Mesa, C. (PI)

DLCL 98: Independent Study for Modern Languages Minor

Independent study for language students pursuing a Modern Languages minor. Instructor consent required before enrolling in this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

DLCL 100: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, , and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 101: Translation Matters: Applications in the 21st Century

For students interested in translation, interpreting, and translationnnstudies. The course will highlight guest speakers who apply translation innna variety of professional contexts (e.g. medical, legal, literary,nnreligious contexts, localization, machine-translation).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 105: Going Medieval: Introduction to Freiburg, Germany, and its Surrounding Region (GERMAN 105)

This course offers an introduction to materials that are pertinent to the BOSP summer seminar "Going Medieval" offered in summer 2015. It is a required course for participants of the seminar.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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