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1 - 10 of 10 results for: DESINST

DESINST 215: The Design of Data

Our world is increasingly complex and laden with many forms of measurable data. Infographics abound, but whether explicit or not, the stories they tell are all designed. In this hyper-concentrated, hands-on course, students will learn to use mapping and design techniques to sort and synthesize data, unlock insights and communicate information. We will create four different types of maps and infographics and students will practice finding insight from both qualitative and quantitative information. Take this course if you are interested in learning how to navigate through and create for the complicated intersection of data and design.nAdmission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classesn for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Carter, C. (PI)

DESINST 230: Bursting the 'Impossible' Bubble-The Art of Creative Engagement

In this class, we¿ll employ the design-thinking process to innovate new theories of learning engagement. Students will explore methodologies like alternative education, improvisational design, storytelling and experience design. Field research will include trips to the SF Exploratorium, the Children's Creativity Museum, Autodesk and Obscura Digital. Students will form hybrid teams with industry experts, fellows, and technical staff, using emerging technology to explore creative leadership and pioneer concepts that will be prototyped, tested, refined and showcased at the Children's Creativity Museum.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

DESINST 255: Design for Health: Helping Patients Navigate the System (EMED 255)

For many people, participating in the American healthcare system is confusing, frustrating and often disempowering. It is also an experience fueled with emotional intensity and feelings of vulnerability. The current ecosystem, with its complexity and multiple stakeholders, is rife with human-centered design opportunities. An especially sticky set of issues lies in the ways people navigate healthcare: understanding how the system works, accessing information about services, making decisions about treatment and interventions, and advocating for needs.nAdmission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classesn for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

DESINST 270: Visual Design Fundamentals

Introduction to the principles, tools, and techniques of visual design and visual communication. Students learn the fundamentals of line, shape, color, composition, and type and use these basic building blocks to communicate with clarity, emotion, and meaning. Four successive design projects introduce new principles and techniques each week. Projects focus on the digital realm of mobile phones, tablets, websites, and other screen-based interfaces. Students get hands-on experience with both vector and bitmap software packages. No prior experience required. Accepting 24 students. Graduate and undergraduate students encouraged to apply. Attendance at all sessions is mandatory. Application required, see dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DESINST 310: Negotiation by Design: Applied Design Thinking for Negotiators

Where many stakeholders are working within a complex scenario, the skilled negotiator is comfortable with the inherent ambiguity, at once nimble and careful in responding to new information and changing positions. In this advanced negotiation course, we will crack open some of the fundamental negotiation principles and show you how, where and why design thinking can add unique value to your negotiation skills and outcomes. Mapping and designing the structure and process of your negotiation; understanding tools to gain empathy for the stakeholders involved in the negotiation; learning different styles of negotiation; practicing spontaneity, adaptability and presence in the moment; team brainstorming in preparation, and team dynamics in the execution of a negotiation. You will work through exercises that isolate these skills and then apply them in simulated negotiations, at least one in every class session, to improve your confidence and competence as a negotiator. You and your teammates more »
Where many stakeholders are working within a complex scenario, the skilled negotiator is comfortable with the inherent ambiguity, at once nimble and careful in responding to new information and changing positions. In this advanced negotiation course, we will crack open some of the fundamental negotiation principles and show you how, where and why design thinking can add unique value to your negotiation skills and outcomes. Mapping and designing the structure and process of your negotiation; understanding tools to gain empathy for the stakeholders involved in the negotiation; learning different styles of negotiation; practicing spontaneity, adaptability and presence in the moment; team brainstorming in preparation, and team dynamics in the execution of a negotiation. You will work through exercises that isolate these skills and then apply them in simulated negotiations, at least one in every class session, to improve your confidence and competence as a negotiator. You and your teammates will then bring them all to bear in a capstone, multi-party, multi-issue negotiation simulation. If you have already taken a basic negotiation course, or have demonstrable experience, we invite you to apply. No previous design thinking experience is required, though certainly useful.nAdmission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classesn for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DESINST 311: Design Abilities Studio

In this Design Abilities Studio students will learn and practice several applied skills with hands-on activities that vary in length, duration, deliverables, and concept. This course focuses on developing core design abilities that make individuals better design thinkers and creative problem solvers. This class is for students of any discipline. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

DESINST 315: Coaching Design Thinking

Design thinking is a team sport. The goal of coaching is to help participants practice the basics and develop skills of the game. This class will break down coaching into its components, parsing out the role of the coach at each stage of the Design Thinking process. Participants will alternate between engaging in activities and coaching them, providing and receiving feedback in real time from the teaching team and their peers. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barry, M. (PI)

DESINST 366: Creative Gym: A Design Thinking Skills Studio

Build your creative confidence and sharpen your design thinking skills. Train your intuition and expand the design context from which you operate every day. This experimental studio will introduce d.school students to fast- paced experiential exercises that lay the mental and physical foundation for a potent bias toward action, and a wider knowledge of the personal skills that expert design thinkers utilize in all phases of their process. Recent research based on this course curriculum show that performing these class activities will expand your creative capacity in statistically significant ways.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DESINST 390: ADVANCED DESIGN STUDIO

Advanced Design Studio will help magnify your design skills, expose you to design-related positions after Stanford, and coach you through working on a project of your own devising. As a key component of the project-based course, students will engage and work with professionals in a range of creative roles. If you want to explore design and its applicability at a higher level, this course is for you.nnIn addition to design project work, Advanced Design Studio will build on introductory design thinking skills and specifically focus on advanced practice in the following:n(1) Making at higher resolution (sketching, graphic design, intentionality, and specific tools such as the x-acto, laser cutter and vinyl cutter)n(2) Synthesis (noticing, reframing, mapping, insight-finding, and ambiguity-navigating)n(3) Communicating (scoping projects, writing, vocalizing intent and vision, recognizing when you've found something interesting, and critique)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DESINST 423: Design for Healthy Behavior Change

In the U.S., 75% of medical expenditures are for illnesses that are predominantly lifestyle related such as type 2 diabetes, arthritis and heart disease. It has been shown as people modify their lifestyles with healthier habits, medical problems can be reduced or avoided and a healthier and happier life achieved. The class employs design thinking in teams while working directly with volunteers in the community to help them achieve their health goals. There is an individual project and a team project each with multiple milestones. Learn and experience the design thinking process through interactions and design working within student teams and working directly with patient-volunteers from the practice of Drs. Ann Lindsay and Alan Glaseroff from the Stanford Coordinated Care Clinic. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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