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1 - 10 of 36 results for: CHPR

CHPR 113: Healthy/Sustainable Food Systems: Maximum Sustainability across Health, Economics, and Environment (HUMBIO 113S)

Focus on problems with and systems-based solutions to food system issues. Four particular settings are addressed: University, worksite, hospital, and school food. Traditional vs. disruptive food system models compared and contrasted. The goal is to determine how best to maximize sustainability across several dimensions, including health, economics, and the environment. Underlying class themes include social justice and the potential for changing social norms around food production and consumption. Discussion-based seminar. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHPR 130: Human Nutrition (HUMBIO 130)

The study of food, and the nutrients and substances therein. Their action, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease. Emphasis is on the biological, chemical, and physiological processes by which humans ingest, digest, absorb, transport, utilize, and excrete food. Dietary composition and individual choices are discussed in relationship to the food supply, and to population and cultural, race, ethnic, religious, and social economic diversity. The relationships between nutrition and disease; ethnic diets; vegetarianism; nutritional deficiencies; nutritional supplementation; phytochemicals. HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 130. CHPR master's students must enroll for a letter grade. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gardner, C. (PI)

CHPR 166: Food and Society: Exploring Eating Behaviors in Social, Environmental, and Policy Context (HUMBIO 166)

The material in this course is an introduction to the field and the target audience is undergraduates. It may be of interest to graduate students unfamiliar with the field. The class examines the array of forces that affect the foods human beings eat, and when, where, and how we eat them, including human labor, agriculture, environmental sustainability, politics, animal rights/welfare, ethics, policy, culture, economics, business, law, trade, and ideology, and psychology. The class addresses the impact of current policies and actions that might be taken to improve human nutrition and health; macro-scale influences on food, nutrition, and eating behavior. . Undergraduate Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHPR 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Baiocchi, M. (PI)

CHPR 200: SPRC/GMD Research Seminar

Focus is on research on prevention of chronic disease and related topics. Guest speakers present material. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

CHPR 201: Introduction to Science of Healthy Living

This introduction to the science of healthy living (primarily U.S.) highlights preventable causes of mortality, i.e. modifiable risk factors, national lifestyle recommendations and behavioral change principles for reducing chronic disease risk. A life course perspective is presented as a trajectory from fetal/neonatal to childhood and adolescence to young, middle-ages and older adults, with recognition of the importance of social determinants of health. Sex & gender differences are also presented. Unless otherwise noted, all lectures are presented by Course Director, Marcia Stefanick, Ph.D. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR masters students, who must take the course for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHPR 202: FUNDAMENTALS OF R

This course is a practicum in which students will use the R programming language to analyze datasets by application of classical statistical methods. No prior experience with R (or other programming languages) is required, but a familiarity with basic descriptive and inferential statistics is assumed. Class sessions will include some lecture content but will emphasize coding demonstrations by the instructor and hands-on coding by each student on their own computers. Students will practice using R with open-source and simulated datasets. The primary goal of the course is to equip students with a fundamental understanding of R's capabilities, experience using R with practice datasets, and the ability to extend their facility with R as their needs dictate.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Bowden, C. (PI)

CHPR 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (HRP 206, MED 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

CHPR 212: Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation (HRP 218, MED 212)

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students. Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

CHPR 220: Research in the Community

Addresses the "nuts and bolts" of conduction community-based participatory research to prepare students for the CHPR internship and thesis. Course limited to current CHPR master's students. Medical students enroll for +/-, all others enroll for S/NC
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
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