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1 - 10 of 29 results for: CHILATST

CHILATST 14N: Growing Up Bilingual (CSRE 14N, EDUC 114N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHILATST 67: Contemporary Chicano & Latino Literature (ENGLISH 67)

What does it mean to be Chicano and Latino in the United States today? And, how have U.S. writers portrayed the evolution of a Latino identity as it has changed from the age of the Civil Rights Movement to the age of Twitter? This class provides students with an overview of 20th and 21st century U.S. Latino/a literature by focusing on American authors writing after the 1960s to the present. We will read a range of writers, including Gloria Anzaldúa, Sandra Cisneros, Héctor Tobar, and Junot Díaz, and examine how these authors grapple with the artistic task of representing the different national cultures and histories (Mexican American, Puerto Rican, etc.) that inform the U.S. Latino experience. Throughout the quarter we will explore how these fictional narratives offer insights into the topics of American identity, immigration, assimilation, class status, Women of Color feminism, gender and sexuality. In addition, we will also consider contemporary representations from film and television, ultimately working toward a comprehensive analysis of how literary genres and popular cultural contribute to the meaning of Latinidad in the U.S.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHILATST 109: GENTE: An incubator for transforming national narratives

Nearly 80,000 individuals who identify as Latino or Latina, turn 18 every MONTH in the United States alone.. Yet despite the rapid growth in numbers and a presence on this continent that predates the country itself, Latina/os are still spoken of largely through the lens of immigration, and primarily during the window of election seasons. This course will design, engage, and deliver human centered strategies and relational activations for transforming national narratives while advancing well being. Our core questions include:n - Who defines a people, and who is involved in definition making? n - What are the ways to engage story beyond marketing concepts into a platform for human connection? n - How does one ¿hack¿ a national narrative?n - How do relational activations like pop up dinners and listening parties create personal doorways for transformation that can be scaled without sacrificing quality?nnPlease note, GENTE is more than an identity-based course. It is initiative that designs blueprints for change-making across identities by curating stories, values and common histories of individuals into a shared future of well being.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gonzales, M. (PI)

CHILATST 110: Sabias Creadoras y Activistas: Chicana/Latina Ways of Knowing

(Open only to Undergraduates.) Chicana feminists have critically challenged masculine nationalist discourse as well as European and North American feminism. Through this course, we examine the diversity in thinking and methodology that defines these discourses from interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspectives to understand the differential access to power experienced by Chicanas. How intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality are informed and practiced by everyday lived experiences such as family life, religion/spirituality, education, and work; political/civic engagement is also central to this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Prieto, L. (PI)

CHILATST 121F: Latinidad in Schools: Cultural and Psychological Perspectives on the Experience of Latinx Students (CSRE 121F)

Latinxs are the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States and are still experiencing inequities within the American educational system. While efforts have been made to address Latinx student success, evidenced by the ever-increasing high school graduation rate, we are still seeing the largest aspiration-attainment gap in college for Latinx students. This course will be in a seminar structure and will cover the various topics that scholars have identified as key factors in the educational success of Latinx students. We will begin the course by examining what racial and ethnic identity are and how they play a role in academic achievement. Then we look at how various social contexts family, school, and policy influence Latinx students in particular. Finally, we will review the literature on college access and persistence for Latinx students and the factors that help or hinder student success. This course will provide students with an overview of Latinx educational experiences in the U.S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHILATST 125S: Chicano/Latino Politics (POLISCI 125S)

The political position of Latinos and Latinas in the U.S.. Focus is on Mexican Americans, with attention to Cuban Americans, Puerto Ricans, and other groups. The history of each group in the American polity; their political circumstances with respect to the electoral process, the policy process, and government; the extent to which the demographic category Latino is meaningful; and group identity and solidarity among Americans of Latin American ancestry. Topics include immigration, education, affirmative action, language policy, and environmental justice.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHILATST 140: Migration in 21st Century Latin American Film (ILAC 140)

Focus on how images and narratives of migration are depicted in recent Latin American film. It compares migration as it takes place within Latin America to migration from Latin America to Europe and to the U.S. We will analyze these films, and their making, in the global context of an evergrowing tension between "inside" and "outside"; we consider how these films represent or explore precariousness and exclusion; visibility and invisibility; racial and gender dynamics; national and social boundaries; new subjectivities and cultural practices. Films include: El niño pez, Bolivia, Ulises, Faustino Mayta visita a su prima, Copacabana, Chico y Rita, Sin nombre, Los que se quedan, Amador, and En la puta calle. Films in Spanish, with English subtitles. Discussions and assignments in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHILATST 147L: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: Latin American Music and Globalization (CSRE 147L, MUSIC 147L, MUSIC 247L)

Focuses on vernacular music of Latin America and the Caribbean, including Mexico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Peru, Brazil, Colombia, and Argentina. Musical examples discussed in relation to: globalization, migration, colonialism, nationalism, diaspora, indigeneity, politics, religion, dance, ethnicity, and gender. How music reflects and shapes cultures, identities, and social structures. Genres addressed: bachata, bossa nova, cumbia, forro, ranchero, reggaeton, rock, salsa, tango, and others. Seminar, guest performances, reading, listening, and analysis. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHILATST 160N: Chican@/Latin@ Performance in the U.S.

This course will introduce works by U.S. Latino and Latina performance artists producing from the margins of the mainstream Euro-American theater world. We will examine how performance art serves as a kind of dramatized political forum for Latino/a artists, producing some of the most transgressive explorations of queer and national/ethnic identities in the U.S. today. By the course's conclusion, each student will create and perform in a staged reading of an original performance piece.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHILATST 164: Immigration and the Changing United States (CSRE 164, SOC 164, SOC 264)

The role of race and ethnicity in immigrant group integration in the U.S. Topics include: theories of integration; racial and ethnic identity formation; racial and ethnic change; immigration policy; intermarriage; hybrid racial and ethnic identities; comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration.
Terms: not given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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