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1 - 10 of 237 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 1A: Introduction to the Visual Arts: Prehistoric through Medieval (CLASSICS 56)

A survey of the art and architecture from the cave paintings of Lascaux to the Gothic Cathedrals of France; the material is organized both chronologically and thematically and covers a multiplicity of religions: pagan, Christian, and Islamic.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 1B: Introduction to the Visual Arts: History of Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present

This course surveys the history of Western painting from the start of the 14th century to the late 20th century and our own moment. Lectures introduce important artists (Giotto, Rembrandt, Velazquez, Goya, Manet, Matisse, Pollock, and others), and major themes associated with the art of particular periods and cultures. The course emphasizes training students to look closely at - and to write about - works of art.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 2: Asian Arts and Cultures (JAPANGEN 60)

An introduction to major monuments, themes, styles, and media of East and South Asian visual arts, in their social, literary, religious, and political contexts. Through close study of primary monuments of architectural, pictorial, and sculptural arts and related texts, this course will explore ritual and mortuary arts; Buddhist arts across Asia; narrative and landscape images; and courtly, urban, monastic, and studio environments for art from Bronze Age to modern eras.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 3: Introduction to World Architecture (CLASSICS 54)

This lecture course surveys the history of architecture and urbanism, from the first societies to the present, in Europe, West and East Asia, the Americas, and Africa. The course progresses by case studies of exemplary monuments and cities, and examines the built environment as both cultural artifact and architectural event. It considers the social and political circumstances of architectural invention as well as plumbing the depth of artistic context by which particular formal choices resonate with an established representational culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 11SC: A Strange Land: Edward Hopper's Paintings of America (AMSTUD 10SC)

In 2015 Stanford's Cantor Arts Center acquired New York Corner (1913), an early painting by the celebrated American artist Edward Hopper (1882-1967). In honor of the acquisition, this seminar will explore Hopper's paintings in detail but with a twist. In each class meeting we will pair Hopper's paintings with the work of another artist or, in some cases, a filmmaker or novelist. The work of these other figures, all notable in their own right, will be given equal if not greater emphasis in each seminar meeting. In classroom discussion, our goal will be to build a rich description of Hopper's art and to understand something of the times when he painted (especially the late 1920s through the late 1950s). If you have wanted to learn how to look closely at a work of art, and how to interpret film and literature with equal depth doing so in intensive conversation with the professor and your peers this is the class for you. Some of the questions we will address: What is an artist?; What is an artist's career?; What does it mean for an artist (or anyone) to develop a lifelong vision of American culture, of American places, of American life?; What is a place (as opposed to a space)?; Is making a painting (or speaking or writing about a painting) a meaningful act in the world?; What does it mean (for Hopper, for any of us) to emerge out of a coherent tradition?; What is high art?; What is popular art?; What are the strengths and limitations of each?
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Nemerov, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 36: DANGEROUS IDEAS (EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as equality, progress, and tradition have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like freedom of the press, fact versus fiction, and citizenship play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Satz, D. (PI)

ARTHIST 80N: The Portrait: Identities in Question

Most of us hold libraries of hundreds or thousands of ¿portraits¿ ¿ more or less instantly available posed images of ourselves and others. For most of human history, before the development of portable and digital cameras, portraiture was a much rarer and more deliberate social act and cultural practice, involving special materials and techniques, encounters with expert portraitists or photographers, and established settings for display. What almost all portraits, of whatever time or cultural place, have in common are presentations of social identities, roles, or persona, as well as a potential fascination and power that may be based in our neurological capacities for facial recognition and ¿mind-reading¿ through facial expressions. n This introductory seminar will explore many aspects of this basically simple category of thing ¿ images of particular persons. Our point of departure will be from the history of art, focusing on portrait sculptures, paintings, and photographs from many era more »
Most of us hold libraries of hundreds or thousands of ¿portraits¿ ¿ more or less instantly available posed images of ourselves and others. For most of human history, before the development of portable and digital cameras, portraiture was a much rarer and more deliberate social act and cultural practice, involving special materials and techniques, encounters with expert portraitists or photographers, and established settings for display. What almost all portraits, of whatever time or cultural place, have in common are presentations of social identities, roles, or persona, as well as a potential fascination and power that may be based in our neurological capacities for facial recognition and ¿mind-reading¿ through facial expressions. n This introductory seminar will explore many aspects of this basically simple category of thing ¿ images of particular persons. Our point of departure will be from the history of art, focusing on portrait sculptures, paintings, and photographs from many eras and cultures, some of which are among the most studied and discussed of all artistic monuments. We will consider techniques and approaches of portrait making, including the conventions that underlie seemingly realistic portraits, posing, the portrait situation, and portrait genres. Our primary focus will be on the multiple purposes of portraiture, from commemoration, political glorification, and self-fashioning to making claims of social status, cultural role, and personal identity. We will also discuss the changing status of portraiture under modern states of social dislocation, technological change, and psychoanalytic interrogation, and in postmodern conditions of multi-mediated realities and distributed subjectivities. Along the way, we will see that our understandings of portraiture benefits from the approaches and insights of many fields ¿ political and social history, anthropology, neuroscience, and literary studies among others.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 99A: Student Guides at the Cantor Arts Center

This course prepares students to lead interactive public tours in the galleries of the Cantor Arts Center. Engaging directly with works of art, students will develop their personal responses to art, think critically about tour-leading methods, develop public speaking and research skills, and practice leading informative and engaging group discussions in the galleries. Guest presentations by museum staff will introduce students to a range of professional practices and standards in the art museum including curatorship, art conservation, and collections management.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 100N: The Artist in Ancient Greek Society (CLASSICS 18N)

Given the importance of art to all aspects of their lives, the Greeks had reason to respect their artists. Yet potters, painters and even sculptors possessed little social standing. n nWhy did the Greeks value the work of craftsmen but not the men themselves? Why did Herodotus dismiss those who worked with their hands as "mechanics?" What prompted Homer to claim that "there is no greater glory for a man¿ than what he achieves with his own hands," provided that he was throwing a discus and not a vase on a wheel?n nPainted pottery was essential to the religious and secular lives of the Greeks. Libations to the gods and to the dead required vases from which to pour them. Economic prosperity depended on the export of wine and oil in durable clay containers. At home, depictions of gods and heroes on vases reinforced Greek values and helped parents to educate their children. Ceramic sets with scenes of Dionysian excess were reserved for elite symposia from which those who potted and painted more »
Given the importance of art to all aspects of their lives, the Greeks had reason to respect their artists. Yet potters, painters and even sculptors possessed little social standing. n nWhy did the Greeks value the work of craftsmen but not the men themselves? Why did Herodotus dismiss those who worked with their hands as "mechanics?" What prompted Homer to claim that "there is no greater glory for a man¿ than what he achieves with his own hands," provided that he was throwing a discus and not a vase on a wheel?n nPainted pottery was essential to the religious and secular lives of the Greeks. Libations to the gods and to the dead required vases from which to pour them. Economic prosperity depended on the export of wine and oil in durable clay containers. At home, depictions of gods and heroes on vases reinforced Greek values and helped parents to educate their children. Ceramic sets with scenes of Dionysian excess were reserved for elite symposia from which those who potted and painted them were excluded.n nSculptors were less lowly but even those who carved the Parthenon were still regarded as "mechanics," with soft bodies and soft minds (Xenophon) "indifferent to higher things" (Plutarch).n nThe seminar addresses these issues. Students will read and discuss texts, write response papers and present slide lectures and gallery talks on aspects of the artist's profession.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 101: Introduction to Greek Art I: The Archaic Period (CLASSICS 161)

This lecture course explores Greek art and culture from 1000-480. In the beginning archaic art forms are more abstract than life-like, closer to Calder than Michelangelo. While Homer describes the rippling muscles (and egos) of his heroes, vase-painters and sculptors prefer abstraction. This changes in the 7th C. as a result of commerce with the Near East and Egypt. Imported Near Eastern bronzes and ivories awaken the Greeks to a wider range of subjects, techniques and ambitions. Later in the century, Greeks in Egypt learn to carve hard stone from Egyptian masters. Throughout the 6th C. Greek artists assimilate what they had borrowed, compete with one another, defy their teachers, test the tolerance of the gods and eventually produce works of art that speak with a Greek accent. When the Persians invade the Acropolis in 480, they find artifacts with little trace of alien influence or imprint - omens of the defiant Greek military that would prevail at Salamis and Plataea.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)
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