2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 450 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 1: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 201)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline¿s distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 1S: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 101S)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 3: Introduction to Archaeology (ARCHLGY 1)

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 4: Language and Culture (ANTHRO 204)

Comparative approach, using examples from many languages. Emphasis is on generally non-Western speech communities. Topics include: the structure of language; the theory of signs; vocabulary and culture; grammar, cognition, and culture (linguistic relativism and determinism); encodability of cultural information in language; language adaptiveness to social function; the ethnography of speaking; registers; discourse (conversation, narrative, verbal art); language and power; language survival and extinction; and linguistic ideology (beliefs about language).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 6: Human Origins (ANTHRO 206, HUMBIO 6)

The human fossil record from the first non-human primates in the late Cretaceous or early Paleocene, 80-65 million years ago, to the anatomically modern people in the late Pleistocene, between 100,000 to 50,000 B.C.E. Emphasis is on broad evolutionary trends and the natural selective forces behind them.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 10A: The Archaeology of Home

Homes evoke powerful emotions about place and also highlight the dynamic and complex nature of people, their relationships, and the broader society they live in. Focus on the ways that material traces from the past shed light on the diversity of domestic life, which includes household organization, economic strategies, diet and status, rituals, and identity. Archaeological case studies to see how archaeologists identify reoccurring patterns in material culture found in homes or domestic dwellings to reconstruct household patterns and social relations.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 11SC: Conservation and Development Dilemmas in the Amazon (HUMBIO 18SC)

This course explores the human dimensions of conservation efforts under way in the Amazon Basin of South America. It has two specific goals: (1) to introduce the human ecology of Amazonia; and (2) to assess the prospects for joint efforts at biodiversity conservation and community development. We will draw on case studies to investigate such topics as the causes and consequences of deforestation, the social impact of parks and protected areas, and the potential for "Integrated Conservation and Development Projects" (ICDPs) such as extractive reserves, natural forest management, biodiversity prospecting, and community-based ecotourism. The course views Amazonia as a microcosm of the challenges facing conservation and development efforts today in the Third World. nPart of the course is an intensive 11-day expedition to the Peruvian Amazon, at no extra cost, to observe firsthand the conservation and development dilemmas discussed in class. We will visit ecolodges in the rainforest, walkin more »
This course explores the human dimensions of conservation efforts under way in the Amazon Basin of South America. It has two specific goals: (1) to introduce the human ecology of Amazonia; and (2) to assess the prospects for joint efforts at biodiversity conservation and community development. We will draw on case studies to investigate such topics as the causes and consequences of deforestation, the social impact of parks and protected areas, and the potential for "Integrated Conservation and Development Projects" (ICDPs) such as extractive reserves, natural forest management, biodiversity prospecting, and community-based ecotourism. The course views Amazonia as a microcosm of the challenges facing conservation and development efforts today in the Third World. nPart of the course is an intensive 11-day expedition to the Peruvian Amazon, at no extra cost, to observe firsthand the conservation and development dilemmas discussed in class. We will visit ecolodges in the rainforest, walking miles of trails to learn about local flora, fauna, and conservation efforts. We will also visit Machu Picchu in the upper reaches of the rainforest. For the travel portion of the class, undergraduates will be joined by a group of Stanford alumni and friends. nStudent contributions and presentations are emphasized throughout the course. Students are expected to come well-prepared to each session, to lead discussions, and to carry out literature research. The final assignment is a 6 to 8 page paper on a case study of your own choosing¿or an equivalent piece of a longer collaborative paper¿that offers a critical assessment of one particular conservation and/or development project in or near the region we will visit. Students will present the main findings of their papers in a joint seminar of undergraduates and alumni as we travel in the Peruvian Amazon. n nNote: Students will arrive on campus and will be housed at Stanford until we leave for the Amazon. Travel to and from Peru¿organized by the Travel/Study Program of the Stanford Alumni Association¿is included; costs are defrayed by the Stanford Field Seminar Fund and generous donors.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 12: Anthropology and Art

Modernity. How the concept of art appears timeless and commonsensical in the West, and with what social consequences. Historicizing the emergence of art. Modernist uses of primitive, child art, asylum, and outsider art.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Malkki, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 12SC: Parks and Peoples: Dilemmas of Protected Area Conservation in East Africa (HUMBIO 19SC)

The world-famous landscapes of East Africa, including Serengeti National Park, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, and the Rift Valley lakes of Tanzania form the backdrop for this special course on protected area conservation and its impacts on local people. The course is designed to explore the pros and cons of parks and protected areas as they affect flora, fauna, and human inhabitants, and to address the dilemma of how to achieve conservation in a manner that creates local community benefits and promotes social justice. We will use a case study approach to ask: (1) What approach to protected area (PA) conservation has been taken in each case? Who are the key proponents and what are their main social and ecological objectives? (2) How successful has the protected area been at achieving its conservation goals? (3) What are the benefits of the PA to people and who receives them? (4) What are the costs of the PA to people and who pays them? (5) Where benefits are not commensurate to costs, what, if anything, is being done to address the imbalance? How well is it working? (6) Are there alternative conservation models that would make the interests of parks and people more compatible, and reduce the tradeoffs between them? What is needed to operationalize these alternative models, and how do they incentivize conservation behavior among local residents?nThis course includes an intensive 12-day expedition to Tanzania to observe firsthand the dilemmas of parks and peoples we have discussed in class. We are scheduled to visit Tarangire, Lake Manyara, Mt. Meru, and Serengeti National Parks, the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, and nearby Maasai villages. Both on campus and in Tanzania, the course emphasizes student contributions and presentations. Students are required to read one or two books a month over the summer, and to come to campus in the fall well-prepared to discuss each one, including co-leading the discussion of one of the readings. Students are also expected to carry out literature research on a particular conservation dilemma in East Africa that is of interest to them for the final assignment of the seminar, a 6- to 8-page paper, and to present the main findings of that paper during evening seminars as we travel in East AfricanNote: Students will arrive on campus and will be housed at Stanford until we leave for the travel portion of the course. A group of 20-some Stanford alumni will join us for the last 2 days on campus and for the travel portion of the course.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Durham, W. (PI)

ANTHRO 13A: Islamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies (ARCHLGY 13, HISTORY 7E, HISTORY 107E)

How has archaeology changed our knowledge of the spread of Islam and past Muslim societies? How does archaeology shape heritage debates, conflicts and ideas about Islam today? Topics include the city and urban change, secular and religious life, gender, economy, and globalization. These topics are explored using archaeological and critical heritage approaches. Focus is on examples drawn from Syria-Palestine, Egypt, Iraq, Arabian Peninsula, India, and Africa. Sources include archaeological data and material culture, historical texts in translation, and photography.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints