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TAPS 12N: To Die For: Antigone and Political Dissent (CLASSGEN 6N)

Preference to freshmen. Tensions inherent in the democracy of ancient Athens; how the character of Antigone emerges in later drama, film, and political thought as a figure of resistance against illegitimate authority; and her relevance to contemporary struggles for women's and workers' rights and national liberation. Readings and screenings include versions of Antigone by Sophocles, Anouilh, Brecht, Fugard/Kani/Ntshona, Paulin, Glowacki, Gurney, and von Trotta.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rehm, R. (PI)

TAPS 20: Acting for Non-Majors (TAPS 124D)

Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Amarotico, K. (PI)

TAPS 21: StoryCraft

Workshop on Performance in Storytelling. Meets on these dates:nThursdays, April 24, May 1 and May 8 - 6:30-9:00pm in RobleGym room 33.nThursday, May 15 from 6-10:30pm in The Nitery for a final performance.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, D. (PI)

TAPS 28: Makeup for the Stage

Techniques of make-up application and design for the actor and artist including corrective, age, character, and fantasy. Emphasis placed on utilizing make-up for development of character by the actor. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Strayer, C. (PI)

TAPS 31: Introduction to Lighting and Production

How light contributes to the creation of mood and atmosphere and different kinds of visibility in theatrical storytelling. The use of controllable qualities of light including color, brightness, angle, and movemen in the theatrical process of creative scenography. Hands-on laboratory time.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ramsaur, M. (PI)

TAPS 39: Theatre Crew

Under faculty guidance, working backstage on Drama Department productions. Open to any student interested in gaining back stage experience. Night and weekend time required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 41N: Inventing Modern Theatre: Georg B├╝chner and Frank Wedekind (GERMAN 41N)

The German writers Georg Büchner (1813-1837) and Frank Wedekind (1864-1918). Many of the most important theater and film directors of the last century, including Max Reinhardt, G. W. Pabst, Orson Welles, Robert Wilson, and Werner Herzog, have wrestled with their works, as have composers and writers from Alban Berg and Bertolt Brecht through Christa Wolf and Thalia Field. Rock artists as diverse as Tom Waits, Lou Reed, Duncan Sheik, and Metallica have recently rediscovered their urgency. Reading these works in translation and examining artistic creations they inspired. Classroom discussions and written responses; students also rehearse and present in-class performances of excerpts from the plays. The aim of these performances is not to produce polished stagings but to creatively engage with the texts and their interpretive traditions. No previous theatrical experience required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 6P: Art is My Occupation: Professional Development for Creatives (ARTSINST 5, ARTSTUDI 6P, MUSIC 6P)

This course is designed to empower arts students to explore their personal and artistic identity, asking: How do I define success and fulfillment? What role will my art play in my professional and personal life? How can I shape the educational experience and career that will serve my long-term goals?nnStudents will also be exposed to various methods and skills from other fields that will be helpful tools in an arts-related career, or any other profession, ranging from branding and promotion, design thinking, and mission-vision strategy. Students will also prepare resumes and an artist biography or cover letter, and create other materials that will assist in the process of job or graduate school applications.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rosenfeld, J. (PI)

TAPS 103: Beginning Improvising

The improvisational theater techniques that teach spontaneity, cooperation, team building, and rapid problem solving, emphasizing common sense, attention to reality, and helping your partner. Based on TheatreSports by Keith Johnstone. Readings, papers, and attendance at performances of improvisational theater. Limited enrollment. Improv, Improvisation, creativity and creative expression.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 112: Creative Expression: Musical Theater (MUSIC 112)

Students begin to create pieces that are fresh and innovative forms of musical theater that do not necessarily appeal to specifically popular audiences but perhaps to audiences more associated with high art, opera, or even contemporary independent music. Musical theater is an untapped resource of potential artistic innovation and has unfortunately become stuck in an ideal of universal accessibility. In present popular culture and the culture of contemporary art forms, musical theater almost exclusively refers to popular productions such as Phantom of the Opera, Rent, Wicked, Jesus Christ Superstar. Although excellent pieces of art in their own way, both dramaturgically and in their ability to evoke emotion through catchy melodies, for the most part each of them have their basis in popular and traditional musical idioms and theatrical forms, seldom exploring more advanced or avant-garde and experimental compositional and theatrical techniques.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Halvorson, B. (PI)

TAPS 113: Creative Expression: Directing the Musical

This course would teach conductors, composers, sound engineers and directors what to consider when directing the music for a musical theater production. Students would learn to efficiently schedule and conduct rehearsals, create legible scores and parts, make a checklist for all the required nuances ie: Music stands, stand lights, stools etc. Additionally, it is evident that musicians, theater artists, dancers, lighting designers, costume designers and scenic designers all have very different cultures in the way they operate: punctuality, preparation, warm ups, expectations etc. In order to have a smooth and successful working relationship with all of these important members of a theatrical production, a musical director must understand these cultures and how to communicate with them using a language they all understand.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Halvorson, B. (PI)

TAPS 120A: Acting I: Scene Study

A substantive introduction to the basics of the craft of acting, this course gives all incoming students the foundation of a common vocabulary. Students will learn fundamental elements of dramatic analysis, and how to apply it in action. Topics include scene analysis, environment work, psychological and physical scoring, and development of a sound and serviceable rehearsal technique. Scene work will be chosen from accessible, contemporary, and realistic plays. Outside rehearsal time required.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 120B: Acting II: Advanced Scene Study

Learn how to expand character work, beyond what is immediately familiar. Continuing basic practices from the first part of the sequence, in this quarter they will look beyond the strictly contemporary, and may begin to approach roles drawn from more challenging dramatic texts. This might include plays chosen from mid-century American classics, World Theater, or other works with specific historic or cultural requirements. Actors begin to learn how a performing artist researches and how that research can be used to enrich and deepen performance. Prerequisite: 120A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Amarotico, K. (PI)

TAPS 124D: Acting for Non-Majors (TAPS 20)

Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Amarotico, K. (PI)

TAPS 126: Your American Life

This is a small seminar designed for students interested in creating scored stories for radio/podcast or live performance¿spoken, sonic stories. We will examine the main features and craft of these kinds of stories, popularized by radio programs like This American Life and live shows like The Moth and you will then write and produce your own piece, be it memoir, documentary, inquiry, or some combination of these genres. Students will have the opportunity to meet at work with some of the best storytellers in America¿this term, you will get to meet and work with Julie Snyder, senior producer of This American Life.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Willihnganz, J. (PI)

TAPS 127: Dynamics of Conflict: Contact and Combat in Performance

How do experiments in movement help artists mine a play for its meanings? How does physical staging illuminate for the audience truths about characters, relationships and the arc of a scene? What can actors learn about themselves and their ensemble through physical improvisation and composition? This course is for students interested in movement and dynamic storytelling; no prior training is required. We will explore the fundamentals of contact improvisation and stage combat as a means of strengthening mind-body connection and preparing the actor for more nuanced, compelling, emotionally-rooted work on the stage. Our training consists of four main components: physical conditioning, practical technique, movement improvisation and the creation of several short performance pieces.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hazas, T. (PI)

TAPS 133: Stage Scenery Design

Craft and Theory of stage scenery design including visual research, spatial organization, basic drafting, sketching and model-building. Prerequisite: 30, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Flatmo, E. (PI)

TAPS 140: Projects in Theatrical Production

A seminar course for students performing significant production work on Drama Department or other Stanford University student theatre projects. Students serving as producers, directors, designers or stage managers, who wish mentorship and credit for their production work sign up for this course and contact the instructor, Linda AppersonnPrerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 151T: Great Books: Dramatic Traditions (TAPS 351)

The most influential and enduring texts in the dramatic canon from Sophocles to Shakepeare, Chekhov to Soyinka. Their historical and geopolitical contexts. Questions about the power dynamics involved in the formation of canons.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 159: Introduction to Game Studies

Games are not new; they are older than civilization. But in the past 50 years or so, we have seen an explosion of creativity in the development of new games, many of which, especially video games, complicate older understandings of what games are. This explosion of creativity has been matched by the increasing visibility and ubiquity of new games and ways of seeing games: as video games, televised professional sports, and even distributed urban events.n nGames are not a simple object of study. There are many ways to understand them: as social practices, as formal systems, as representative artwork, as modes of learning, and many more. We will start by considering games as a mode of performance, considering games in relation to theater and other forms of aesthetic performance. However, we will take a deeply interdisciplinary approach to the study of games, and will draw on perspectives from design, philosophy, education, and the emerging discipline of video game studies. We will also, of course, draw on a variety of games, both online and offline. As we bring in these perspectives, we will begin to consider games in at least two other fundamental ways: as designed experiences and as composed systems or artworks.nnThis course is less an attempt to provide a survey of the entire field of games. It is more an attempt to provide a basic toolbox for critically examining and analyzing games. These tools are potentially useful for anyone who interacts with games: whether as a consumer of entertainment, a critical analyst of play, a user of serious games, or a game designer.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; St. Clair, M. (PI)

TAPS 160: Rethinking the Ballerina (DANCE 160, TAPS 260)

The ballerina occupies a unique place in popular imagination as an object of over-determined femininity as well as an emblem of extreme physical accomplishment for the female dancer. This seminar is designed as an investigation into histories of the ballerina as an iconographic symbol and cultural reference point for challenges to political and gender ideals. Through readings, videos, discussions and viewings of live performances this class investigates pivotal works, artists and eras in the global histories of ballet from its origins as a symbol of patronage and power in the 15th century through to its radical experiments as a site of cultural obedience and disobedience in the 20th and 21st centuries.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 167: Introduction to Greek Tragedy (CLASSGEN 110)

Gods and heroes, fate and free choice, gender conflict, the justice or injustice of the universe: these are just some of the fundamental human issues that we will explore in about ten of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McCall, M. (PI)

TAPS 170B: Directing Workshop: The Actor-Director Dialogue (TAPS 372)

This course focuses on the actor-director dialogue. We will work with actors and directors developing approaches to collaboration that make the actor-director dialogue in theater.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 178B: Intensive Playwriting (CSRE 178B, TAPS 278)

Intermediate level study of fundamentals of playwriting through an intensive play development process. Course emphasizes visual scripting for the stage and play revision. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Suzan-Lori Parks, Tony Kushner, Adrienne Kennedy, Edward Albee, Maria Irene Fornes and others. Table readings of full length work required by quarter¿s end.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 179F: Flor y Canto: Poetry Workshop (CHILATST 179F, CSRE 179F, TAPS 279F)

Poetry reading and writing. The poet as philosopher and the poet as revolutionary. Texts: the philosophical meditations of pre-Columbian Aztec poetry known as flor y canto, and reflections on the poetry of resistance born out of the nationalist and feminist struggles of Latin America and Aztlán. Required 20-page poetry manuscript.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moraga, C. (PI)

TAPS 180Q: Noam Chomsky: The Drama of Resistance

Preference to sophomores. Chomsky's ideas and work which challenge the political and economic paradigms governing the U.S. Topics include his model for linguistics; cold war U.S. involvements in S.E. Asia, the Middle East, Central and S. America, the Caribbean, and Indonesia and E. Timor; the media, terrorism, ideology, and culture; student and popular movements; and the role of resistance.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rehm, R. (PI)

TAPS 201A: Honors Colloquium

See "Undergraduate Programs" for description.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jakovljevic, B. (PI)

TAPS 201B: Honors Colloquium

See "Undergraduate Programs" for description.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jakovljevic, B. (PI)

TAPS 201C: Honors Colloquium

See "Undergraduate Programs" for description.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jakovljevic, B. (PI)

TAPS 201D: Honors Colloquium

See "Undergraduate Programs" for description.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jakovljevic, B. (PI)

TAPS 202: Honors Thesis

See "Undergraduate Programs" for description. May be repeated for credit. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 203: Advanced Improvisation

Further development of improvisational skills.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, D. (PI)

TAPS 22: Scene Work

For actors who complete substantial scene work with graduate directors in the graduate workshop.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 231: Advanced Stage Lighting Design

Individually structured class in lighting mechanics and design through experimentation, discussions, and written reports. Prerequisite: 131 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 233: Advanced Scene Design

Individually structured workshop. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 133 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 234: Advanced Stage Management Project

For students stage managing a Department of Drama production. Prerequisite: 134.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-9 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Apperson, L. (PI)

TAPS 25Q: Science-in-Theatre: A New Genre? (CHEM 25Q)

Preference to sophomores. Contrasts through selected "science-in-theatre" plays what Theatre can do for science compared to what Science occasionally does for the theatre as well as emphasizing in that regard some unique features of the theatre compared to films. Illustrates why more intellectually challenging "science-in-theatre" plays have appeared in recent times where scientific behavior and scientists are presented accurately rather than just as Frankensteins, Strangeloves or nerds. Students engage in a playwriting experiment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Djerassi, C. (PI)

TAPS 260: Rethinking the Ballerina (DANCE 160, TAPS 160)

The ballerina occupies a unique place in popular imagination as an object of over-determined femininity as well as an emblem of extreme physical accomplishment for the female dancer. This seminar is designed as an investigation into histories of the ballerina as an iconographic symbol and cultural reference point for challenges to political and gender ideals. Through readings, videos, discussions and viewings of live performances this class investigates pivotal works, artists and eras in the global histories of ballet from its origins as a symbol of patronage and power in the 15th century through to its radical experiments as a site of cultural obedience and disobedience in the 20th and 21st centuries.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 278: Intensive Playwriting (CSRE 178B, TAPS 178B)

Intermediate level study of fundamentals of playwriting through an intensive play development process. Course emphasizes visual scripting for the stage and play revision. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Suzan-Lori Parks, Tony Kushner, Adrienne Kennedy, Edward Albee, Maria Irene Fornes and others. Table readings of full length work required by quarter¿s end.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 279F: Flor y Canto: Poetry Workshop (CHILATST 179F, CSRE 179F, TAPS 179F)

Poetry reading and writing. The poet as philosopher and the poet as revolutionary. Texts: the philosophical meditations of pre-Columbian Aztec poetry known as flor y canto, and reflections on the poetry of resistance born out of the nationalist and feminist struggles of Latin America and Aztlán. Required 20-page poetry manuscript.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 29: Theater Performance: Acting

Students cast in department productions receive credit for their participation as actors; 1-2 units for graduate directing workshop projects and 1-3 units for major productions (units determined by instructor). May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 290: Special Research

Individual project on the work of a playwright, period, or genre.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 351: Great Books: Dramatic Traditions (TAPS 151T)

The most influential and enduring texts in the dramatic canon from Sophocles to Shakepeare, Chekhov to Soyinka. Their historical and geopolitical contexts. Questions about the power dynamics involved in the formation of canons.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 372: Directing Workshop: The Actor-Director Dialogue (TAPS 170B)

This course focuses on the actor-director dialogue. We will work with actors and directors developing approaches to collaboration that make the actor-director dialogue in theater.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 39D: Theater Performance: Prosser Stage Management

For students stage mananging a Department of Drama Senior Project or Assistant Staage managing a Department Drama production
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Apperson, L. (PI)

TAPS 123: Speaking with Distinction

Find your voice, focus your presence, stand your ground, and deliver your message with authority, clarity, and grace. nSPEAKING WITH DISTINCTION is a course is designed for anyone who has a need to speak to one person or a hundred people and make the message clear.nnEssential for presentations of all kinds ¿ whether in the classroom, workplace, or marketplacen¿ present key concepts and ideas with power and enthusiasmn¿ Speak to large audiencesn¿ One-on-one presentationsn¿ Speak to motivate, collaborate, inspirennLearn to think on your feet so that you are not dependent on notes, slides or luck.nIncrease your presence and build your public speaking skills in a fun and supportive environment
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; bihr, j. (PI)

TAPS 134: Stage Management Project

For students stage managing a Department of Drama production.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Apperson, L. (PI)

TAPS 190: Special Research

Individual project on the work of a playwright, period, or genre. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 191: Independent Study

Individual supervision of off-campus internship. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 200: Senior Project

See "Undergraduate Programs" for description. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 232: Advanced Costume Design

Individually structured tutorial for costume designers. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 132 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Strayer, C. (PI)

TAPS 259: Game Studies

A 1-unit class for graduate students. Games are not new; they are older than civilization. But in the past 50 years or so, we have seen an explosion of creativity in the development of new games, many of which, especially video games, complicate older understandings of what games are. This explosion of creativity has been matched by the increasing visibility and ubiquity of new games and ways of seeing games: as video games, televised professional sports, and even distributed urban events.n nGames are not a simple object of study. There are many ways to understand them: as social practices, as formal systems, as representative artwork, as modes of learning, and many more. We will start by considering games as a mode of performance, considering games in relation to theater and other forms of aesthetic performance. However, we will take a deeply interdisciplinary approach to the study of games, and will draw on perspectives from design, philosophy, education, and the emerging discipline of video game studies. We will also, of course, draw on a variety of games, both online and offline. As we bring in these perspectives, we will begin to consider games in at least two other fundamental ways: as designed experiences and as composed systems or artworks.nnThis course is less an attempt to provide a survey of the entire field of games. It is more an attempt to provide a basic toolbox for critically examining and analyzing games. These tools are potentially useful for anyone who interacts with games: whether as a consumer of entertainment, a critical analyst of play, a user of serious games, or a game designer.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; St. Clair, M. (PI)

TAPS 289A: Interactive Art / Performance Design (ME 289A)

This class is for those who want the experience of designing and creating interactive art and performance pieces for public audiences, using design thinking as the method, and supported by guest speakers, artist studio visits and needfinding trips to music festivals, museums and performances.nnDrawing on the fields of design, art, performance, and engineering, each student will ideate, design, plan and lead a team to build an interactive art and/or performance piece to be showcased to audience of 5000 at the Frost Music and Art Festival held on the Stanford campus on May 17th 2014. Projects can range from interactive art to unconventional set design, and from site-specific sculpture to immersive performance.nnThis is a two-quarter long commitment during which students will first learn the design, planning, story boarding, budgeting, engineering, proposal creation and concept pitching of projects for applying for grants and presenting to funders. The second quarter will concentrate on prototyping, maquette making, testing, team forming, project management, creative leadership, construction, site installation and documentation.nPart one of a two course series: ME 289A&B.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 313: Performance and Performativity

Performance theory through topics including: affect/trauma, embodiment, empathy, theatricality/performativity, specularity/visibility, liveness/disappearance, belonging/abjection, and utopias and dystopias. Readings from Schechner, Phelan, Austin, Butler, Conquergood, Roach, Schneider, Silverman, Caruth, Fanon, Moten, Anzaldúa, Agamben, Freud, and Lacan. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Phelan, P. (PI)

TAPS 314: Performing Identities

This course focuses on contemporary South Asian and Black diasporic art work that concerns itself with questions of atrocity and activism. We will ask how artists engage world-historical events and what constitutes activism. Theoretical work will be wide-ranging as will the kinds of art and topics studied: indeed, we will discuss everything from Agamben to AIDS, Ai Wei-Wei to feminist punk in Russia, female circumcision in Sweden to U.N. aid workers in Afghanistan, queer subjects and global ideas freedom.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 336: Comprehensive 1st Year Exam

Required course for first-year Ph.D. students in Theater & Performance Studies. Credits for work toward the Comprehensive 1st-year Exam taken in late February or Early March.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Phelan, P. (PI)

TAPS 376: Projects in Performance

Creative projects to be determined in consultation with Drama graduate faculty and production advisor
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 377: Graduate Directors' Staged Reading Project

Presentation of a new or newly adapted work for the stage, in a mode employed in professional theater for the development of new plays. Two to four rehearsals. Public performance.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 381: Instantaneous, Incessant, Infinite: Time and Performance

Time is the most fundamental and elusive aspect of performance. In this graduate seminar we will investigate time in performance from various perspectives: while getting acquainted with some of the most prominent recent conceptualizations of temporality (Henri Bergson, Marin Heidegger, Gilles Deleuze) we will also explore questions of politics of temporality, ethnographic and sociological study of time, and its peculiar place within literary studies. Most of all, we will investigate complex temporality of performance: from performances of great magnitude, to micro performances, to performance as a medium of time¿s commodification. While drawing on questions that emerge from PSi 19: Performance and Temporality, we will explore some aspects of this theme that were insufficiently addressed in the conference.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jakovljevic, B. (PI)

TAPS 390: Directed Reading

(Staff) Students may take directing reading only with the permission of their dissertation advisor. Might be repeatable for credit twice for 6 units total.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 399: Dissertation Research

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 801: TGR Project

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

TAPS 802: TGR Dissertation

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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