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PSYC 51Q: Culture, Psychology, and Mental Health Treatment

Focuses on a critical analysis of Western approach to psychology and psychiatric terms of understanding mental illness, psychiatric phenomena, and treatment of mental health disorders. Includes an orientation to and critique of western clinical psychology/psychiatry and an inquity as to its relevance outside Western settings. Includes guest speakers representing cross-cultural providers of mental health services as well as medical anthropologists and critics of the Western generalizations in psychiatry. Special attention place on cross-cultural psychiatry and international mental health efforts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reicherter, D. (PI)

PSYC 53Q: Your Secret Mind: Getting to Know and Living with your Unconscious

Focuses on the motivational unconscious. Topics include the science of the unconscious mind and the techniques used to gain conscious access to these psychological process, as well as methods of exploring students' own unconscious for creative purposes and to understand personal habits, reactions, motives, emotions and thoughts. Case-based, problem-oriented format utilized to develop foundational understanding of the science of the unconscious mind. Emphasis on student study of self and own unconscious as case for the class. Student privacy will be protected.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Steiner, H. (PI)

PSYC 54N: Genes, Memes and Behavior

Examines how natural selection operates to shape successful genes in the gene pool, how cultural selection operates to shape successful "memes" in the pool of cultural ideas, and how selection by consequences operates to shape successful behaviors in our repertoires. Topics include cases in which selection produces undesirable consequences (e.g. genetic mutations, cultural problems, and aberrant behaviors in children). Emphasis on understanding the role of modern natural science in complex behaviors and why study of human life from an interdisciplinary perspective is important.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hall, S. (PI)

PSYC 60N: The Psychology of Stoked

Examines the biological, psychological and social aspects of what it means to live a positive, life-affirming existence. Drawing from a wide range of sources, from psychiatry and psychology, to spirituality and philosophy, seminar informs on the latest thinking about the psychology of happiness, and questions assumptions about personal happiness. Explores the new field of positive psychology and pulls from a multidisciplinary literature, examining life satisfaction and happiness from many perspectives, and the psychiatry of stimulation including substance, human sexuality, and healthy methods of attaining happiness. Includes guest speakers from many different backgrounds and perspectives. Examines what it means to be truly mindful.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYC 71N: Eight Ages of Man

Ways in which a psychologcially-minded attitude can add to the appreciation of literature; how literature can be used to understand issues and themes of the developing personality. Using the well-known essay by psychoanalyst Erik Erikson, "The Eight Ages of Man," as a foundation, works reflecting elements of an age or ages are read. "Wisdom of the Ego" by Dr. George Valliant serves as a resouce to better understand this model, as well as offering a more contemporary theory of personality development.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Van Natta, J. (PI)

PSYC 78N: Mental Health in Collegiate Athletes

Developmental, psychological, social, and performance issues in collegiate sports. Topics include transition to Stanford, time management, optimizing mental fitness, coping with injuries.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Steiner, H. (PI); Lee, M. (TA)

PSYC 82: The Literature of Psychosis (ANTHRO 82P, HUMBIO 162L, PSYC 282)

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a complex concept. It can be terrifying and devastating for patients and families, and yet shares characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis. We will approach it from multiple perspectives, including clinical descriptions, works of art, and texts by writers ranging from Shakespeare, to the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, to patients attempting to describe their experience. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Mason, D. (PI)

PSYC 83: Addictions in our World: From Physiology to Human Behavior

Addiction is a powerful brain-based behavioral disorder that interferes with many lives. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health has estimated 21.5 million Americans aged 12 and older are classified as having a substance use disorder, an extraordinary 8.1% of the population. The field of mental health is advancing the understanding of this disorder through research, education, innovation and policy guidance. This class aims to help students better understand the struggles of addiction in our world by discussing many components involved in the disease including: physiology, psychology, treatment options, and the societal implications of addiction.nnStudents will engage in thought-provoking between psychology, neuroscience, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic in our world. As technology advances, many new types of addiction are emerging, creating an additional urgent need to discuss the implications this burgeoning problem. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity inherent to the issues surrounding addiction, and increase the student¿s ability to more critically assimilate and interrogate information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 111Q: Madness and the Womb: Medical and Artistic Approaches to Mental Illness in Women Through the Ages

Historical and current concepts of mental illness in women. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS), postpartum depression, menopausal mood disorders, and eating disorders. Historical biopsychosocial approach. Readings include women's diaries and advice books, physicians' casebooks, and 19th- and 20th-century medical texts. Guest speakers from art and literature departments. Literary and artistic images, and the social and cultural contexts of these disorders during the last 300 years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYC 135: Sleep and Dreams (PSYC 235)

The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep and covers how sleep affects our daily lives-- both physical and mental functions of our well-being. The course covers the science of sleep, dreams, and the pathophysiology of highly prevalent sleep disorders such as sleep deprivation, biological rhythms, and focuses on the physiology of non-REM and REM sleep. Course content empowers students to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of their lives and shapes students' attitudes about the importance of sleep. Learning about the science of sleep provides tangible reason to respect sleep as a member of what we term the triumvirate of health: good nutrition, physical fitness, and healthy sleep. Undergraduates must enroll in PSYC 135, while graduate students should enroll in PSYC 235
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 136A: Valuescience: Shedding Illusion to Live and Die Well (PSYC 236A)

Apply scientific methods and principles to discern and realize value. Read history, philosophy, ecology, economics, sociology, linguistics and psychology pertinent to emergence of valuescience as foundation for an increasing range of human action. Explore perceptual, cognitive, and cultural impediments to valuescience; strategies for overcoming these; and personal and social benefits of doing so. 4 units includes weekly practice (e.g., meditation, aerobic exercise). Students may enroll in PSYC 136A or PSYC 136B or both. Either may be taken first.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Schrom, D. (PI)

PSYC 136B: Valuescience: Shedding Illusion to Live and Die Well (PSYC 236B)

Apply scientific methods and principles to discern and realize value. Read history, philosophy, ecology, economics, sociology, linguistics and psychology pertinent to emergence of valuescience as foundation for an increasing range of human action. Explore perceptual, cognitive, and cultural impediments to valuescience, strategies for overcoming these, and personal and social benefits of doing so. 4 units includes weekly practice (e.g., meditation, aerobic exercise). Students may enroll in PSYC 136A or PSYC 136B or both. Either may be taken first.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Schrom, D. (PI)

PSYC 139: Understanding Relationships: A Couples and Family Therapy Perspective (PSYC 239)

Considers the premises of the family-systems approach to intimate and family relationships, drawing on concepts from psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, anthropology, and organizational behavior. Examines relationship formation and commitment, intimacy and sexuality, family development and structure, interpersonal conflict and communication, historical patterns and legacies, gender and power, and the cultural and larger systemic contexts of close relationships. Frameworks for assessing relationships and tools for changing romantic, family, and social relationships are examined in detail, and case examples illustrate the relationship change strategies of major contributors to the field. Highlights practical applications of the family-systems approach in educational, medical, business, and community settings. Students do not need to have a background in Psychology or Human Biology, and all student levels are welcome (including GSB, Law, Medicine, GSE for PSYC 239).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rait, D. (PI)

PSYC 195: Special Laboratory Projects

Assist Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Program with data entry, library organization, and study-related projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rasgon, N. (PI)

PSYC 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Adamson, M. (PI); Adelsheim, S. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Ashford, J. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Beaudreau, S. (PI); Benham, A. (PI); Berk, M. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Bohon, C. (PI); Brown, M. (PI); Bullock, K. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Cassidy, E. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Chetty, S. (PI); Cloitre, M. (PI); Conner, L. (PI); Corcoran, K. (PI); Cosgrove, V. (PI); De Golia, S. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Dunn, L. (PI); Durazzo, T. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Fenn, H. (PI); Fung, L. (PI); Furst, A. (PI); Gandy, S. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gengoux, G. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Greaves, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Haberecht, M. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hosseini, H. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Kishore, A. (PI); Kogon, M. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Laurent, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Linenberg, B. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lotspeich, L. (PI); Louie, A. (PI); Luce, K. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); Mason, D. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); McGovern, M. (PI); Mccaslin, S. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nathan, K. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); Noordsy, D. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ordaz, S. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pasca, S. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Ringold, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rodriguez, C. (PI); Rosen, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Ruzek, J. (PI); Sadeh Sharvit, S. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Saggar, M. (PI); Salehi, A. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Thienemann, M. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tiet, Q. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Trafton, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Van Natta, J. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warner, D. (PI); Weitlauf, J. (PI); White-Huber, B. (PI); Williams, K. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Woodward, S. (PI); Wroolie, T. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Yoon, J. (PI); Zappert, L. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); Zelenko, M. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (SI); Hardan, A. (SI); Lock, J. (SI); Manber, R. (SI); Singh, M. (SI); Tarshis, T. (SI); Taylor, C. (SI); Packer, M. (GP)

PSYC 211: Developmental Psychopathology, Psychotherapy and Psychopharmacology

Common syndromes in child psychiatry. Topics include diagnosis, epidemiology, etiology, course, outcome and therapeutic interventions. Prerequisite: familiarity with the basics of psychiatric and psychological discourse; psychiatry clerkship or course in psychology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Joshi, S. (PI)

PSYC 225: Stanford Klingenstein Fellowship Program

A mentoring program designed to expose first and second year medical students to the rewarding field of child and adolescent psychiatry, and to increase awareness and education about child and adolescent mental health issues. Offers a year-long program wherein medical students are paired with child and adolescent psychiatrists, meeting bimonthly for clinical experiences and mentoring. Also provides opportunities for the students to get involved in cutting-edge scientific research, networking opportunities, and opportunities to attend professional conferences.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 233: Mindfulness: An Awareness-Based Stress Reduction Program in Medicine

An experiential program in which the participants learn the techniques of mindfulness meditation and its application in the management of stress and in healthcare. Modeled after the MBSR, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, started by Jon Kabat-Zinn at UMASS Medical Center. Designed to work with the mind/body relationship to stress and chronic illness teaching open sensitive awareness without judgement of mental or physical reactivity. Requirement for the course is the daily practice of mindfulness meditation, attendance at weekly class meetings and the all day retreat, home reading, and a final paper covering the student's observations.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Abramson, M. (PI)

PSYC 235: Sleep and Dreams (PSYC 135)

The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep and covers how sleep affects our daily lives-- both physical and mental functions of our well-being. The course covers the science of sleep, dreams, and the pathophysiology of highly prevalent sleep disorders such as sleep deprivation, biological rhythms, and focuses on the physiology of non-REM and REM sleep. Course content empowers students to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of their lives and shapes students' attitudes about the importance of sleep. Learning about the science of sleep provides tangible reason to respect sleep as a member of what we term the triumvirate of health: good nutrition, physical fitness, and healthy sleep. Undergraduates must enroll in PSYC 135, while graduate students should enroll in PSYC 235
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 236A: Valuescience: Shedding Illusion to Live and Die Well (PSYC 136A)

Apply scientific methods and principles to discern and realize value. Read history, philosophy, ecology, economics, sociology, linguistics and psychology pertinent to emergence of valuescience as foundation for an increasing range of human action. Explore perceptual, cognitive, and cultural impediments to valuescience; strategies for overcoming these; and personal and social benefits of doing so. 4 units includes weekly practice (e.g., meditation, aerobic exercise). Students may enroll in PSYC 136A or PSYC 136B or both. Either may be taken first.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Schrom, D. (PI)

PSYC 236B: Valuescience: Shedding Illusion to Live and Die Well (PSYC 136B)

Apply scientific methods and principles to discern and realize value. Read history, philosophy, ecology, economics, sociology, linguistics and psychology pertinent to emergence of valuescience as foundation for an increasing range of human action. Explore perceptual, cognitive, and cultural impediments to valuescience, strategies for overcoming these, and personal and social benefits of doing so. 4 units includes weekly practice (e.g., meditation, aerobic exercise). Students may enroll in PSYC 136A or PSYC 136B or both. Either may be taken first.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Schrom, D. (PI)

PSYC 239: Understanding Relationships: A Couples and Family Therapy Perspective (PSYC 139)

Considers the premises of the family-systems approach to intimate and family relationships, drawing on concepts from psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, anthropology, and organizational behavior. Examines relationship formation and commitment, intimacy and sexuality, family development and structure, interpersonal conflict and communication, historical patterns and legacies, gender and power, and the cultural and larger systemic contexts of close relationships. Frameworks for assessing relationships and tools for changing romantic, family, and social relationships are examined in detail, and case examples illustrate the relationship change strategies of major contributors to the field. Highlights practical applications of the family-systems approach in educational, medical, business, and community settings. Students do not need to have a background in Psychology or Human Biology, and all student levels are welcome (including GSB, Law, Medicine, GSE for PSYC 239).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rait, D. (PI)

PSYC 249SI: Psyched: Psychiatry Careers and Mental Health Perspectives for Medicine

In this lunchtime discussion series, students will explore psychiatry subspecialty career through the personal perspectives and narratives of attending psychiatrists from a variety of practice settings. Special sessions will vary by year but have previously featured residency panel discussions, augmented reality simulations of psychosis, and motivational interviewing workshops.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYC 250: Methodology of Research in Behavioral Sciences

Statistical and methodological issues in twomajor psychiatric research themes: clinical psychiatric research (Aut), neuroimaging research (Win), and statistical genetics and general statistical modeling (Spr). Autumn series includes: basics of inferential statistics, group comparison, analysis of variance, regression analysis, multivariate analysis, and longitudinal analysis in the context of psychiatric and behavioral research. Also included are conceptual topics such as risk factors, mediation, moderation, and causal inference. Winter series includes: functional and structural neuroimaging research methods (e.g. functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), structural MRI (sMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), electroencephalogram (EEG)). Basic principles, statistical analysis methods, advantages and limitations, and applications are discussed. Spring series includes: tests and effect estimation for multiple SNPs, genes or pathways in genetic association studies, gene-gene interactions, twins and heritability estimates, Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium, interpretation and presentation of results for a range of statistical models for different types of data. Practical examples from recent research within the Department of Psychiatry will be used throughout the course. Prerequisite: Some exposure to statistical methods, either from course work or from participation in research having some behavioral aspects, or consent of instructor. 1 unit for class participation only, 2 units includes weekly assignments, 3 units includes a final project.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 282: The Literature of Psychosis (ANTHRO 82P, HUMBIO 162L, PSYC 82)

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a complex concept. It can be terrifying and devastating for patients and families, and yet shares characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis. We will approach it from multiple perspectives, including clinical descriptions, works of art, and texts by writers ranging from Shakespeare, to the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, to patients attempting to describe their experience. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Mason, D. (PI)

PSYC 286: Culture and Madness: Anthropological and Psychiatric Approaches to Mental Illness (ANTHRO 186, ANTHRO 286, HUMBIO 146)

Unusual mental phenomena have existed throughout history and across cultures. Taught by an anthropologist and psychiatrist, this course explores how different societies construct the notions of "madness": What are the boundaries between "normal" and "abnormal", reason and unreason, mind and body, diversity and disease? The course will be taught in conjunction with a two unit engaged learning component which will place students in relevant settings.nnOptional: The course will be taught in conjunction with an optional two-unit engaged learning component
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYC 290: Teaching in Psychiatry

Practical experience in teaching by serving as a teaching assistant in a psychiatry course. Unit values are allotted individually to reflect the level of teaching responsibility assigned to the student.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Adamson, M. (PI); Adelsheim, S. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Ashford, J. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Beaudreau, S. (PI); Benham, A. (PI); Berk, M. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Bohon, C. (PI); Brown, M. (PI); Bullock, K. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Cassidy, E. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Cloitre, M. (PI); Conner, L. (PI); Corcoran, K. (PI); De Golia, S. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Dunn, L. (PI); Durazzo, T. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Fenn, H. (PI); Furst, A. (PI); Gandy, S. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gengoux, G. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Greaves, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Haberecht, M. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Kishore, A. (PI); Kogon, M. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Laurent, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Linenberg, B. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lotspeich, L. (PI); Louie, A. (PI); Luce, K. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Mccaslin, S. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nathan, K. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); Noordsy, D. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pasca, S. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Ringold, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rodriguez, C. (PI); Rosen, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Ruzek, J. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Salehi, A. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Thienemann, M. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tiet, Q. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Trafton, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Van Natta, J. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warner, D. (PI); Weitlauf, J. (PI); Williams, K. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Woodward, S. (PI); Wroolie, T. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Yoon, J. (PI); Zappert, L. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); Zelenko, M. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Packer, M. (GP)

PSYC 299: Directed Reading in Psychiatry

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Adamson, M. (PI); Adelsheim, S. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Ashford, J. (PI); Bale, R. (PI); Bandstra, B. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Beaudreau, S. (PI); Benham, A. (PI); Berk, M. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Bohon, C. (PI); Brown, M. (PI); Bullock, K. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Cassidy, E. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Cloitre, M. (PI); Conner, L. (PI); Corcoran, K. (PI); De Golia, S. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Dunn, L. (PI); Durazzo, T. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Fenn, H. (PI); Furst, A. (PI); Gandy, S. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gengoux, G. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Greaves, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Haberecht, M. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Kishore, A. (PI); Kletter, H. (PI); Kogon, M. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Laurent, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Linenberg, B. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lotspeich, L. (PI); Louie, A. (PI); Luce, K. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Mccaslin, S. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nathan, K. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); Noordsy, D. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pasca, S. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Ringold, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rodriguez, C. (PI); Rosen, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Ruzek, J. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Salehi, A. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Thienemann, M. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tiet, Q. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Trafton, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Van Natta, J. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warner, D. (PI); Weitlauf, J. (PI); Williams, K. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Woodward, S. (PI); Wroolie, T. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Yoon, J. (PI); Zappert, L. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); Zelenko, M. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Carrion, V. (SI); Packer, M. (GP)

PSYC 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Adamson, M. (PI); Adelsheim, S. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Ashford, J. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Beaudreau, S. (PI); Benham, A. (PI); Berk, M. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Bohon, C. (PI); Brown, M. (PI); Bullock, K. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Cassidy, E. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Cloitre, M. (PI); Conner, L. (PI); Corcoran, K. (PI); De Golia, S. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Dunn, L. (PI); Durazzo, T. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Fenn, H. (PI); Furst, A. (PI); Gandy, S. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gengoux, G. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Greaves, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Haberecht, M. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Kishore, A. (PI); Kogon, M. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Laurent, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Linenberg, B. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lotspeich, L. (PI); Louie, A. (PI); Luce, K. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Mccaslin, S. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nathan, K. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); Noordsy, D. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pasca, S. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Ringold, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rodriguez, C. (PI); Rosen, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Ruzek, J. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Salehi, A. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Thienemann, M. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tiet, Q. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Trafton, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Van Natta, J. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warner, D. (PI); Weitlauf, J. (PI); Williams, K. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Woodward, S. (PI); Wroolie, T. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Yoon, J. (PI); Zappert, L. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); Zelenko, M. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Packer, M. (GP)

PSYC 399: Graduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Adamson, M. (PI); Adelsheim, S. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Ashford, J. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Beaudreau, S. (PI); Benham, A. (PI); Berk, M. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Bohon, C. (PI); Brown, M. (PI); Bullock, K. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Cassidy, E. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Cloitre, M. (PI); Conner, L. (PI); Corcoran, K. (PI); De Golia, S. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Dunn, L. (PI); Durazzo, T. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Fenn, H. (PI); Furst, A. (PI); Gandy, S. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gengoux, G. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Greaves, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Haberecht, M. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Kishore, A. (PI); Kogon, M. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Laurent, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Linenberg, B. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lotspeich, L. (PI); Louie, A. (PI); Luce, K. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Mccaslin, S. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nathan, K. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); Noordsy, D. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pasca, S. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Ringold, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rodriguez, C. (PI); Rosen, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Ruzek, J. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Salehi, A. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Thienemann, M. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tiet, Q. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Trafton, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Van Natta, J. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warner, D. (PI); Weitlauf, J. (PI); Williams, K. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Woodward, S. (PI); Wroolie, T. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Yoon, J. (PI); Zappert, L. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); Zelenko, M. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Packer, M. (GP)
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