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PSYC 50Q: Brain Training: Hype or Help?

Focuses on primary literature to evaluate evidence supporting claims that concerted practice can lead to improvements in capacities such as working memory, speed of processing and IQ. Looks across lifespan from childhood and remediation of learning disabilities to elderly individuals and the potential for brain training to delay onset of dementia. Examines new research into brain training as treatment for psychiatric disorders, as well as neuroscience behind learning and memory. Considers ethical implications of these programs. Students participate in brain training and track and analyze progress.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYC 53Q: Secret Mind: Getting to Know and Living with your Unconscious

Focuses on the motivational unconscious. Topics include the science of the unconscious mind and the techniques used to gain conscious access to these psychological process, as well as methods of exploring students' own unconscious for creative purposes and to understand personal habits, reactions, motives, emotions and thoughts. Case-based, problem-oriented format utilized to develop foundational understanding of the science of the unconscious mind. Emphasis on student study of self and own unconscious as case for the class. Student privacy will be protected.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Steiner, H. (PI)

PSYC 54N: Genes, Memes and Behavior

Examines how natural selection operates to shape successful genes in the gene pool, how cultural selection operates to shape successful "memes" in the pool of cultural ideas, and how selection by consequences operates to shape successful behaviors in our repertoires. Topics include cases in which selection produces undesirable consequences (e.g. genetic mutations, cultural problems, and aberrant behaviors in children). Emphasis on understanding the role of modern natural science in complex behaviors and why study of human life from an interdisciplinary perspective is important.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hall, S. (PI)

PSYC 135: Sleep and Dreams (PSYC 235)

This uniquely Stanford science course, that has been taught for over 40 years, will cover how sleep affects our daily lives-- both physical and mental functions of our well being. Focuses on the physiology of non-REM and REM sleep as well as the pathophysiology of highly prevalent sleep disorders. Includes outreach projects and guest lectures by established experts in their fields. Students monitor and analyze their own sleep patterns. At the conclusion of this course students are expected to appreciate the importance of sleep as a cornerstone of their health
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Bohon, C. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Fung, L. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Kletter, H. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Stewart, M. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); White-Huber, B. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (SI); Hardan, A. (SI); Manber, R. (SI); Taylor, C. (SI); Riley, R. (GP)

PSYC 213: Policy Practicum: Designing a Social Impact Bond for Santa Clara County Mental Health

(Same as LAW 413X) Students in this Policy Lab practicum will work with Dr. Humphreys, the Santa Clara County Counsel's Office, and Third Sector to develop the scheme, including designing clear metrics for success and undertaking a cost-benefit analysis of the de-institutionalization of mental health patients. It is likely that we will collaborate with faculty and students from other schools and departments having particular expertise in cost-benefit analysis and evaluation. Special Instructions: Total enrollment in this course will be limited to 12 (4 SLS students, 4 Medical School students & 4 other). A preference will be given to students who can enroll for both the Autumn and Winter quarters. Students may normally receive no more than four units for a Policy Lab practicum and no more than a total of eight units of Policy Lab practicums and Directed Research projects combined may be counted toward graduation unless additional units for graduation are approved in advanced by the Petitions Committee. A student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructors. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 235: Sleep and Dreams (PSYC 135)

This uniquely Stanford science course, that has been taught for over 40 years, will cover how sleep affects our daily lives-- both physical and mental functions of our well being. Focuses on the physiology of non-REM and REM sleep as well as the pathophysiology of highly prevalent sleep disorders. Includes outreach projects and guest lectures by established experts in their fields. Students monitor and analyze their own sleep patterns. At the conclusion of this course students are expected to appreciate the importance of sleep as a cornerstone of their health
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 290: Teaching in Psychiatry

Practical experience in teaching by serving as a teaching assistant in a psychiatry course. Unit values are allotted individually to reflect the level of teaching responsibility assigned to the student.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Adelsheim, S. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jain, S. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Riley, R. (GP)

PSYC 299: Directed Reading in Psychiatry

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Bale, R. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Kletter, H. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Yoon, J. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Carrion, V. (SI); Riley, R. (GP)

PSYC 29SI: ASB: Illuminating Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Mental Health in the Bay Area and Beyond

Sheds light on campus mental health resource availability, different types of mental health disorders, root causes of mental health disorders, current care and treatment methods. Topics include the impacts of mental health issues on larger communities and how students can serve as allies to those seeking to make mental health a priority in personal lives, government policy, education and medical research. Includes service trip during spring recess.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYC 35SI: Clinical and Societal Issues of Neurological Disorders

Provides introductory exposure to some of the most common neurological disorders currently diagnosed in the U.S. Looks at clinical and societal aspects of such neurological disorders.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

PSYC 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jain, S. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pasca, S. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Riley, R. (GP)

PSYC 399: Graduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Yoon, J. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Riley, R. (GP)

PSYC 51Q: Culture, Psychology, and Mental Health Treatment

Focuses on a critical analysis of Western approach to psychology and psychiatric terms of understanding mental illness, psychiatric phenomena, and treatment of mental health disorders. Includes an orientation to and critique of western clinical psychology/psychiatry and an inquity as to its relevance outside Western settings. Includes guest speakers representing cross-cultural providers of mental health services as well as medical anthropologists and critics of the Western generalizations in psychiatry. Special attention place on cross-cultural psychiatry and international mental health efforts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reicherter, D. (PI)

PSYC 52Q: Public Mental Health and Community Psychiatry

Focuses on mental health systems of care in the United States with special attention to community Psychiatry and mental health for the underserved. Emphasizes understanding issues involved with providing mental health treatment in a public health setting as well as to special populations. Guest speakers include policy makers and local providers. Students introduced to possibilities for Stanford-supported local public service opportunities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reicherter, D. (PI)

PSYC 70N: Mind-Body Medicine: A Global Perspective

Explores ways in which the powerful connection between the brain and the body can be harnessed to maintain health or fight disease.Intended for students who have a general interest in matters of mind and health, and students who are specifically interested in the psychological/biological/medical sciences. Course begins with a historical perspective on how diverse cultures and medical systems from around the world grapple with the concept of the mind-body connection, then goes through a clear and accessible overview of the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, and then explores mind-body techniques used in modern societies. Investigates the mind-body connection in the context of: western medicine, traditional medical systems of different cultures, health effects of "good" versus "bad" stress, meditation and other stress reduction techniques, positive and negative emotions, medical applications of hypnosis, the placebo and nocebo effects, and disorders such as anxiety and depression.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dhabhar, F. (PI)

PSYC 76Q: Temperament and Creativity in Mood Disorders

Preference to sophomores. Western cultural notions of mad geniuses and artistic temperaments. How many individuals who suffer from depression, bipolar disorder, and related problems are nonetheless productively creative. Current psychological and neurobiological research, and assessment of mood, temperament, and creativity. Emphasis is on written and oral communications and multimedia presentations.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYC 77N: Deviants in Literature

Many literary works are enhanced by, in fact demand, a psychological perspective to achieve a fully informed reading. In The Devils Dostoevsky uses the issues and process of anarchy as a platform on which to develop some of the most unforgettable characters in literary history. Death in Venice contains among its many themes the darker dynamic of paraphilia. Guilt searches for a validating crime in Kafka's The Penal Colony. Capote uses a journalistic style to manage horrible fact during In Cold Blood. Conrad shows that telling a story of the journey outward is more nearly an analysis of the journey inward in Heart of Darkness. Albee's Zoo Story asks whether the man on the street is prepared to confront his own worst nightmare. Close reading of works such as these presents opportunities to learn about character pathology and to expand traditional approaches to literary criticism by applying a psychological perspective.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Van Natta, J. (PI)

PSYC 78Q: Mental Health in Collegiate Athletes

Developmental, psychological, social, and performance issues in collegiate sports. Topics include transition to Stanford, time management, optimizing mental fitness, coping with injuries.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Steiner, H. (PI)

PSYC 79Q: Family Dynamics in Literature

Preference to sophomores. Using a psychological approach, explores relationships between and among the characters of well-known literary works. Primary readings include: Freud's Dora: An Analysis of a Case of Hysteria; Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 1, which anticipates what Freud later calss "the unconscious,"; Kafka's Metamorphosis, the "identified patient" in family of seemingly unconventional make-up; and Flaubert's Madame Bovary.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYC 81Q: Fate of Orphans and Vulnerable Children in Sub Saharan Africa

The complicated forces,shaped by geopolitcal history and current events, that frame all social programs, the care of orphans in the context of the AIDS pandemic in particular; history of the care of orphans; developmental effects of deprivation of care and nurturing. Guest speakers.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYC 111Q: Madness and the Womb: Medical and Artistic Approaches to Mental Illness in Women Through the Ages

Historical and current concepts of mental illness in women. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS), postpartum depression, menopausal mood disorders, and eating disorders. Historical biopsychosocial approach. Readings include women's diaries and advice books, physicians' casebooks, and 19th- and 20th-century medical texts. Guest speakers from art and literature departments. Literary and artistic images, and the social and cultural contexts of these disorders during the last 300 years.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYC 136A: Valuescience: Shedding Illusion to Live Better (PSYC 236A)

Apply scientific methods and principles to discern and realize value. Read history, philosophy, ecology, economics, sociology, linguistics and psychology pertinent to emergence of valuescience as foundation for an increasing range of human action. Explore perceptual, cognitive, and cultural impediments to valuescience; strategies for overcoming these; and personal and social benefits of doing so. 4 units includes weekly practice (e.g., meditation, aerobic exercise). Students may enroll in PSYC 136A or PSYC 136B or both. Either may be taken first.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 136B: Valuescience: Shedding Illusion to Live Better (PSYC 236B)

Apply scientific methods and principles to discern and realize value. Read history, philosophy, ecology, economics, sociology, linguistics and psychology pertinent to emergence of valuescience as foundation for an increasing range of human action. Explore perceptual, cognitive, and cultural impediments to valuescience, strategies for overcoming these, and personal and social benefits of doing so. 4 units includes weekly practice (e.g., meditation, aerobic exercise). Students may enroll in PSYC 136A or PSYC 136B or both. Either may be taken first.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 139: Understanding Relationships: A Couples and Family Therapy Perspective (PSYC 239)

Considers the premises of the family-systems approach to intimate and family relationships, drawing on concepts from psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, anthropology, and organizational behavior. Examines relationship formation and commitment, intimacy and sexuality, family development and structure, interpersonal conflict and communication, historical patterns and legacies, gender and power, and the cultural and larger systemic contexts of close relationships. Frameworks for assessing relationships and tools for changing romantic, family, and social relationships are examined in detail, and case examples illustrate the relationship change strategies of major contributors to the field. Highlights practical applications of the family-systems approach in educational, medical, business, and community settings. Students do not need to have a background in Psychology or Human Biology, and all student levels are welcome (including GSB, Law, Medicine, GSE for PSYC 239).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rait, D. (PI)

PSYC 195: Special Laboratory Projects

Assist Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Program with data entry, library organization, and study-related projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rasgon, N. (PI)

PSYC 211: Child and Adolescent Psychopathology

Common syndromes in child psychiatry. Topics include diagnosis, epidemiology, etiology, course, outcome and therapeutic interventions. Prerequisite: familiarity with the basics of psychiatric and psychological discourse; psychiatry clerkship or course in psychology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 212: Pediatric Psychosomatic Medicine: Psychological Issues in the Physically Ill Child

Open to MD and graduate students; qualified undergraduates by consent of instructor. Diagnosis and management of emotional disorders and difficulties in physically ill children and adolescents. Topics include psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic approaches to psychiatric disorders encountered in the pediatric medical health care setting. Oral and multimedia presentations. Prerequisite: familiarity with basic principles of psychopathology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYC 225: Stanford Klingenstein Fellowship Program

A mentoring program designed to expose first and second year medical students to the rewarding field of child and adolescent psychiatry, and to increase awareness and education about child and adolescent mental health issues. Offers a year-long program wherein medical students are paired with child and adolescent psychiatrists, meeting bimonthly for clinical experiences and mentoring. Also provides opportunities for the students to get involved in cutting-edge scientific research, networking opportunities, and opportunities to attend professional conferences.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 233: Mindfulness: An Awareness-Based Stress Reduction Program in Medicine

An experiential program in which the participants learn the techniques of mindfulness meditation and its application in the management of stress and in healthcare. Modeled after the MBSR, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, started by Jon Kabat-Zinn at UMASS Medical Center. Designed to work with the mind/body relationship to stress and chronic illness teaching open sensitive awareness without judgement of mental or physical reactivity. Requirement for the course is the daily practice of mindfulness meditation, attendance at weekly class meetings and the all day retreat, home reading, and a final paper covering the student's observations.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Spiegel, D. (PI)

PSYC 236A: Valuescience: Shedding Illusion to Live Better (PSYC 136A)

Apply scientific methods and principles to discern and realize value. Read history, philosophy, ecology, economics, sociology, linguistics and psychology pertinent to emergence of valuescience as foundation for an increasing range of human action. Explore perceptual, cognitive, and cultural impediments to valuescience; strategies for overcoming these; and personal and social benefits of doing so. 4 units includes weekly practice (e.g., meditation, aerobic exercise). Students may enroll in PSYC 136A or PSYC 136B or both. Either may be taken first.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 236B: Valuescience: Shedding Illusion to Live Better (PSYC 136B)

Apply scientific methods and principles to discern and realize value. Read history, philosophy, ecology, economics, sociology, linguistics and psychology pertinent to emergence of valuescience as foundation for an increasing range of human action. Explore perceptual, cognitive, and cultural impediments to valuescience, strategies for overcoming these, and personal and social benefits of doing so. 4 units includes weekly practice (e.g., meditation, aerobic exercise). Students may enroll in PSYC 136A or PSYC 136B or both. Either may be taken first.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 239: Understanding Relationships: A Couples and Family Therapy Perspective (PSYC 139)

Considers the premises of the family-systems approach to intimate and family relationships, drawing on concepts from psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, anthropology, and organizational behavior. Examines relationship formation and commitment, intimacy and sexuality, family development and structure, interpersonal conflict and communication, historical patterns and legacies, gender and power, and the cultural and larger systemic contexts of close relationships. Frameworks for assessing relationships and tools for changing romantic, family, and social relationships are examined in detail, and case examples illustrate the relationship change strategies of major contributors to the field. Highlights practical applications of the family-systems approach in educational, medical, business, and community settings. Students do not need to have a background in Psychology or Human Biology, and all student levels are welcome (including GSB, Law, Medicine, GSE for PSYC 239).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rait, D. (PI)

PSYC 247: Principles and Practices in Care of the Dying

Detailed, systematic survey of a generalized terminal illness and elaboration of the basic principles underlying approaches to the care of the dying. Particular attention is paid to problem areas involving medical ethics and multi-culture. Practical strategies for managing the special medical and emotional problems that arise in the care of the dying patient. There may be guest speakers and patient interviews. No final examination. (Minimum: 4 students)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 250: Methodology of Research in Behavioral Sciences

Statistical and methodological issues in twomajor psychiatric research themes: clinical psychiatric research (Aut), neuroimaging research (Win), and statistical genetics and general statistical modeling (Spr). Autumn series includes: basics of inferential statistics, group comparison, analysis of variance, regression analysis, multivariate analysis, and longitudinal analysis in the context of psychiatric and behavioral research. Also included are conceptual topics such as risk factors, mediation, moderation, and causal inference. Winter series includes: functional and structural neuroimaging research methods (e.g. functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), structural MRI (sMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), electroencephalogram (EEG)). Basic principles, statistical analysis methods, advantages and limitations, and applications are discussed. Spring series includes: tests and effect estimation for multiple SNPs, genes or pathways in genetic association studies, gene-gene interactions, twins and heritability estimates, Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium, interpretation and presentation of results for a range of statistical models for different types of data. Practical examples from recent research within the Department of Psychiatry will be used throughout the course. Prerequisite: Some exposure to statistical methods, either from course work or from participation in research having some behavioral aspects, or consent of instructor. 1 unit for class participation only, 2 units includes weekly assignments, 3 units includes a final project.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
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