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AFRICAAM 8: Conjure and Manifest: Building a Sustainable Artistic Practice (CSRE 8)

In this course, student-artists spend time investigating their artistic practice as a framework for promoting power, wellness, and creativity; and as a tangible means for navigating the first steps of their artistic careers. We spend time critically examining the philosophies and works of Black artists including James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, RZA (Wu-Tang Clan) and Nayyirah Waheed, in order to explore new visions for the artist as activist, as futurist and as spiritual healer. We then use a mixture of these ideas and our own¿along with meditation and mindfulness experiences¿to begin conjuring and manifesting intimate relationships with our art practice and ourselves. Student-artists will develop creative confidence, formulate game plans for success, and begin to find balance between the uncertainty and ultimate freedom that life as an artist can bring.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Holt, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 54N: African American Women's Lives (AMSTUD 54N, CSRE 54N, FEMGEN 54N, HISTORY 54N)

Preference to freshmen. We will examine the struggles of African American women to define their own lives and improve the social, economic, political and cultural conditions of black communities. Topics will include women¿s enslavement and freedom, kinship and family relations, institution and community building, violence, labor and leisure, changing gender roles, consumer and beauty culture, social activism, and the politics of sexuality.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hobbs, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 166: Introduction to African American History - the Modern Freedom Struggle (AMSTUD 166, CSRE 166, HISTORY 66, HISTORY 166)

Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute, this course will utilize multi-media materials to shed light on the relationship between grassroots activism and King's visionary leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

AMSTUD 54N: African American Women's Lives (AFRICAAM 54N, CSRE 54N, FEMGEN 54N, HISTORY 54N)

Preference to freshmen. We will examine the struggles of African American women to define their own lives and improve the social, economic, political and cultural conditions of black communities. Topics will include women¿s enslavement and freedom, kinship and family relations, institution and community building, violence, labor and leisure, changing gender roles, consumer and beauty culture, social activism, and the politics of sexuality.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hobbs, A. (PI)

AMSTUD 102: Art and Social Criticism (AFRICAAM 102B, ARTHIST 162B, CSRE 102A, FEMGEN 102)

Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, and immigrant rights? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers¿ Coalition¿s agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP¿s emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago¿s The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson¿s Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon¿s paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy of marginalization and modeled ways of resisting that marginalization. For three decades feminist artists Barbara Kruger and the Guerilla Girls have combined institutional critique and direct address into a provocative form of criticality. Recent art for social justice is reaching ever broadening publics by redrawing the role of artist and audience exemplified by the democratization of poster making and internet campaigns of the Occupy and #BlackLivesMatter movements. Why are each of these examples successful as influential and enduring markers of social criticism? We will also consider the visual culture of new protest strategies in the Post-Occupy era. What have these socially responsive practices contributed to our understanding of American history? We will conclude with an investigation into large-scale transnational participatory projects, including Tania Bruguera¿s Immigrant Movement International and Ai Weiwei¿s @Large on Alcatraz Island.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hertz, B. (PI)

AMSTUD 107: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (CSRE 108, FEMGEN 101, TAPS 108)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brody, J. (PI)

AMSTUD 166: Introduction to African American History - the Modern Freedom Struggle (AFRICAAM 166, CSRE 166, HISTORY 66, HISTORY 166)

Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute, this course will utilize multi-media materials to shed light on the relationship between grassroots activism and King's visionary leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

COMPMED 85N: Animal Use in Biomedical Research

Preference to freshmen. How and why animals are used in biomedical science. Addresses human and animal disease entities and how animal research has contributed to the treatment and cure of disease. Significantnportions of this course are devoted to documenting the humane care and treatment of laboratory animals in research, including, but not limited to such topics as laws and ethics, animal behavior, animal modeling, and the animal activist movement. Course topics will also include: What advances have been made as a result of the use of animals in research? Who conducts animal research? Predominant animal species used in biomedical research, facts and myths; the regulation of biomedical research; housing and care of laboratory animals; why new drugs must be tested; animal use in stem cell research, cancer research and genetically engineered mice; career choices in biomedical research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Albertelli, M. (PI)

CSRE 8: Conjure and Manifest: Building a Sustainable Artistic Practice (AFRICAAM 8)

In this course, student-artists spend time investigating their artistic practice as a framework for promoting power, wellness, and creativity; and as a tangible means for navigating the first steps of their artistic careers. We spend time critically examining the philosophies and works of Black artists including James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, RZA (Wu-Tang Clan) and Nayyirah Waheed, in order to explore new visions for the artist as activist, as futurist and as spiritual healer. We then use a mixture of these ideas and our own¿along with meditation and mindfulness experiences¿to begin conjuring and manifesting intimate relationships with our art practice and ourselves. Student-artists will develop creative confidence, formulate game plans for success, and begin to find balance between the uncertainty and ultimate freedom that life as an artist can bring.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Holt, A. (PI)

CSRE 54N: African American Women's Lives (AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, FEMGEN 54N, HISTORY 54N)

Preference to freshmen. We will examine the struggles of African American women to define their own lives and improve the social, economic, political and cultural conditions of black communities. Topics will include women¿s enslavement and freedom, kinship and family relations, institution and community building, violence, labor and leisure, changing gender roles, consumer and beauty culture, social activism, and the politics of sexuality.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hobbs, A. (PI)

CSRE 108: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (AMSTUD 107, FEMGEN 101, TAPS 108)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brody, J. (PI)

FEMGEN 54N: African American Women's Lives (AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, CSRE 54N, HISTORY 54N)

Preference to freshmen. We will examine the struggles of African American women to define their own lives and improve the social, economic, political and cultural conditions of black communities. Topics will include women¿s enslavement and freedom, kinship and family relations, institution and community building, violence, labor and leisure, changing gender roles, consumer and beauty culture, social activism, and the politics of sexuality.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hobbs, A. (PI)

FEMGEN 101: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (AMSTUD 107, CSRE 108, TAPS 108)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brody, J. (PI)

HISTORY 54N: African American Women's Lives (AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, CSRE 54N, FEMGEN 54N)

Preference to freshmen. We will examine the struggles of African American women to define their own lives and improve the social, economic, political and cultural conditions of black communities. Topics will include women¿s enslavement and freedom, kinship and family relations, institution and community building, violence, labor and leisure, changing gender roles, consumer and beauty culture, social activism, and the politics of sexuality.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hobbs, A. (PI)

HISTORY 66: Introduction to African American History - the Modern Freedom Struggle (AFRICAAM 166, AMSTUD 166, CSRE 166, HISTORY 166)

Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute, this course will utilize multi-media materials to shed light on the relationship between grassroots activism and King's visionary leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 73: Mexican Migration to the United States (AMSTUD 73, CHILATST 173, HISTORY 173)

This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama¿s immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak about the role of remittances, the effect of deportations, and the loss of life at the border. Unfortunately, few people truly understand the historical trends in these migratory processes, or the multifaceted role played by the United States in encouraging individuals to head there. Moreover, few people have actually heard the opinions and voices of migrants themselves. This course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to place migrants¿ experiences in dialogue with migratory laws as well as the knowledge to embed current understandings of Latin American migration in their meaningful historical context.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 109E: Global Women Leaders: Past, Present, and Future

What conditions prompted the emergence of women political leaders around the world and what difference has their leadership made? This course introduces students to global women's history and focuses on a series of individual women leaders in the 20th century. We look at movements for women's self-determination in the 19th and 20th centuries that set the stage for women's emergence as national political leaders and activists in the 20th century. We then focus on a series of global women leaders including Eleanor Roosevelt, Golda Meir, Margaret Thatcher, Benazir Bhutto, Michelle Bachelet and Aung San Suu Kyi. By studying their biographies and historical contributions, we will explore the ways women leaders make distinctive contributions as heads of state and political activists.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Horn, M. (PI)

HISTORY 166: Introduction to African American History - the Modern Freedom Struggle (AFRICAAM 166, AMSTUD 166, CSRE 166, HISTORY 66)

Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute, this course will utilize multi-media materials to shed light on the relationship between grassroots activism and King's visionary leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 173: Mexican Migration to the United States (AMSTUD 73, CHILATST 173, HISTORY 73)

This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama¿s immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak about the role of remittances, the effect of deportations, and the loss of life at the border. Unfortunately, few people truly understand the historical trends in these migratory processes, or the multifaceted role played by the United States in encouraging individuals to head there. Moreover, few people have actually heard the opinions and voices of migrants themselves. This course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to place migrants¿ experiences in dialogue with migratory laws as well as the knowledge to embed current understandings of Latin American migration in their meaningful historical context.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 227: East European Women and War in the 20th Century (FEMGEN 227, HISTORY 327)

Thematic chronological approach through conflicts in the region: Balkan Wars, WWI, WWII, and Yugoslav wars. Ways women in E. Europe involved in and affected by wars; comparison with women in W. Europe in the two world wars. Examines women's involvement in war as members of military services, backbone of underground movements, workers in war industries, mothers of soldiers, subjects and supporters of war aims and propaganda, activists in peace movements, and objects of wartime destruction, dislocation, and sexual violation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 327: East European Women and War in the 20th Century (FEMGEN 227, HISTORY 227)

Thematic chronological approach through conflicts in the region: Balkan Wars, WWI, WWII, and Yugoslav wars. Ways women in E. Europe involved in and affected by wars; comparison with women in W. Europe in the two world wars. Examines women's involvement in war as members of military services, backbone of underground movements, workers in war industries, mothers of soldiers, subjects and supporters of war aims and propaganda, activists in peace movements, and objects of wartime destruction, dislocation, and sexual violation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

LAWGEN 115N: Human Rights Advocacy

What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in human rights advocacy? In the space of 60 years, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discussion, if not practice. In this seminar we will examine the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as well as the vast challenges faced by advocates in the recent past and today. Together, we will learn to be critical of, as well as to think, and act, like human rights advocates. This seminar will introduce you to some the main debates and dilemmas within the human rights movement. We will consider and understand the differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the frequently non-western) developing world, as well as tensions between and among rights advocates along other important dimensions (civil and political vs. economic, social and cultural rights; rights promotion through engagement of powerful actors vs. challenging structures of power, etc.). The seminar seeks to develop your ability: 1) to understand human rights and social justice issues as contested political, legal and cultural phenomena; 2) to review advocacy texts, videos and other interventions critically; 3) to appreciate the political dimensions of efforts to promote human rights; 4) to understand how recent history constrains and structures options and possibilities for social intervention to promote rights and justice. During the course of the quarter you will be required to submit several short reflection papers and develop a human rights advocacy campaign.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cavallaro, J. (PI)

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laws, A. (PI)

PWR 1MC: Writing & Rhetoric 1: Oppositional Rhetoric: Resistance and Public Protest

In 2010, the University of Michigan hosted an international conference entitled "Against Health," which questioned how health has become a moralizing system dictating how people should behave and make decisions. In 2014, the Whitney Biennial selected Jackie Wang's anti-racist essay "Against Innocence" to be sold as part of their elite art exhibition. But how can one be "against health" or "against innocence"? These titles pose riddles for their readers. They use a strategy of oppositional rhetoric to challenge foundational assumptions in provocative ways. How can we as writers contend with the challenges at the heart of such rhetoric? For a full course description, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Crandall, M. (PI)

PWR 2KTA: Writing & Rhetoric 2: A Rebel With A Cause: The Rhetoric of Giving a Damn

Prerequisite: PWR 1. In this course, we will explore a variety of movements from marriage equality and civil rights to climate change. We will also examine individuals and the manner in which they advance the causes that matter to them most, including astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, anti-racism activist Tim Wise, and equal education activist Malala Yousafzai. Ultimately, students will use knowledge gained to assist delivery of research, both in written and oral form, in cultural contexts and from the disciplinary perspective of students' choosing. For more information about PWR 2, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-2. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Tarr, K. (PI)

TAPS 108: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (AMSTUD 107, CSRE 108, FEMGEN 101)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brody, J. (PI)
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