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MATSCI 100: Undergraduate Independent Study

Independent study in materials science under supervision of a faculty member.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 143: Materials Structure and Characterization

Students will study the theory and application of characterization techniques used to examine the structure of materials at the nanoscale. Students will learn to classify the structure of materials such as semiconductors, ceramics, metals, and nanotubes according to the principles of crystallography. Methods used widely in academic and industrial research, including X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, will be demonstrated along with their application to the analysis of nanostructures. Prerequisites: E-50 or equivalent introductory materials science course. (Formerly 153)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brock, R. (PI); Pian, K. (TA)

MATSCI 156: Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution (EE 293A, ENERGY 293A)

Operating principles and applications of emerging technological solutions to the energy demands of the world. The scale of global energy usage and requirements for possible solutions. Basic physics and chemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, and batteries. Performance issues, including economics, from the ideal device to the installed system. The promise of materials research for providing next generation solutions. Undergraduates register in 156 for 4 units; graduates register in 256 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 145 and 152 or equivalent coursework in thermodynamics and electronic properties.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 158: Soft Matter in Biomedical Devices, Microelectronics, and Everyday Life (BIOE 158, CHEMENG 160)

The relationships between molecular structure, morphology, and the unique physical, chemical, and mechanical behavior of polymers and other types of soft matter are discussed. Topics include methods for preparing synthetic polymers and examination of how enthalpy and entropy determine conformation, solubility, mechanical behavior, microphase separation, crystallinity, glass transitions, elasticity, and linear viscoelasticity. Case studies covering polymers in biomedical devices and microelectronics will be covered. Recommended: ENGR 50 and Chem 31A or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 161: Energy Materials Laboratory (MATSCI 171)

A material that is currently being used in a cutting edge energy -related device such as a solar cell, battery or smart window will be thoroughly characterized throughout the quarter. Fabrication techniques could include electroplating, spin coating and thermal evaporation. There will be an emphasis in this course on characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy, four-point probe measurements of conductivity, visible absorption and reflection spectroscopy and electrochemical measurements (cyclic voltammetry). Devices will be fabricated and their performance will be tested. In this Writing in the Major course, students will put together all of the data they collect during the quarter into a final paper. Undergraduates register for 161 for 4 units; graduates register for 171 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 143 or equivalent course in materials characterization
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 162: X-Ray Diffraction Laboratory (MATSCI 172, PHOTON 172)

Experimental x-ray diffraction techniques for microstructural analysis of materials, emphasizing powder and single-crystal techniques. Diffraction from epitaxial and polycrystalline thin films, multilayers, and amorphorous materials using medium and high resolution configurations. Determination of phase purity, crystallinity, relaxation, stress, and texture in the materials. Advanced experimental x-ray diffraction techniques: reciprocal lattice mapping, reflectivity, and grazing incidence diffraction. Enrollment limited to 20. Undergraduates register for 162 for 4 units; graduates register for 172 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 143 or equivalent course in materials characterization.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 171: Energy Materials Laboratory (MATSCI 161)

A material that is currently being used in a cutting edge energy -related device such as a solar cell, battery or smart window will be thoroughly characterized throughout the quarter. Fabrication techniques could include electroplating, spin coating and thermal evaporation. There will be an emphasis in this course on characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy, four-point probe measurements of conductivity, visible absorption and reflection spectroscopy and electrochemical measurements (cyclic voltammetry). Devices will be fabricated and their performance will be tested. In this Writing in the Major course, students will put together all of the data they collect during the quarter into a final paper. Undergraduates register for 161 for 4 units; graduates register for 171 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 143 or equivalent course in materials characterization
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 172: X-Ray Diffraction Laboratory (MATSCI 162, PHOTON 172)

Experimental x-ray diffraction techniques for microstructural analysis of materials, emphasizing powder and single-crystal techniques. Diffraction from epitaxial and polycrystalline thin films, multilayers, and amorphorous materials using medium and high resolution configurations. Determination of phase purity, crystallinity, relaxation, stress, and texture in the materials. Advanced experimental x-ray diffraction techniques: reciprocal lattice mapping, reflectivity, and grazing incidence diffraction. Enrollment limited to 20. Undergraduates register for 162 for 4 units; graduates register for 172 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 143 or equivalent course in materials characterization.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 194: Thermodynamics and Phase Equilibria

The principles of heterogeneous equilibria and their application to phase diagrams. Thermodynamics of solutions; chemical reactions; non-stoichiometry in compounds; first order phase transitions and metastability; thermodynamics of surfaces, elastic solids, dielectrics, and magnetic solids. Undergraduates register for 194 for 4 units; graduates register for 204 for 3 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MATSCI 195: Waves and Diffraction in Solids (MATSCI 205, PHOTON 205)

The elementary principals of x-ray, vibrational, and electron waves in solids. Basic wave behavior including Fourier analysis, interference, diffraction, and polarization. Examples of wave systems, including electromagnetic waves from Maxwell's equations. Diffracted intensity in reciprocal space and experimental techniques such as electron and x-ray diffraction. Lattice vibrations in solids, including vibrational modes, dispersion relationship, density of states, and thermal properties. Free electron model. Basic quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics including Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. Prerequisite: MATSCI 193/203 or consent of instructor. Undergraduates register for 195 for 4 units; graduates register for 205 for 3 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dionne, J. (PI); Dai, A. (TA)

MATSCI 205: Waves and Diffraction in Solids (MATSCI 195, PHOTON 205)

The elementary principals of x-ray, vibrational, and electron waves in solids. Basic wave behavior including Fourier analysis, interference, diffraction, and polarization. Examples of wave systems, including electromagnetic waves from Maxwell's equations. Diffracted intensity in reciprocal space and experimental techniques such as electron and x-ray diffraction. Lattice vibrations in solids, including vibrational modes, dispersion relationship, density of states, and thermal properties. Free electron model. Basic quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics including Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. Prerequisite: MATSCI 193/203 or consent of instructor. Undergraduates register for 195 for 4 units; graduates register for 205 for 3 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dionne, J. (PI); Dai, A. (TA)

MATSCI 230: Materials Science Colloquium

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MATSCI 299: Practical Training

Educational opportunities in high-technology research and development labs in industry. Qualified graduate students engage in internship work and integrate that work into their academic program. Following the internship, students complete a research report outlining their work activity, problems investigated, key results, and any follow-on projects they expect to perform. Student is responsible for arranging own employment. See department student services manager before enrolling.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MATSCI 301: Engineering Energy Policy Change

Government policy profoundly affects all aspects of the energy ecosystem, including its supply, distribution, storage and utilization. Policy decisions also influence the pace and focus of innovation of new technologies, including through government-funded research and development programs. This course will equip graduate students, who have strong science and engineering backgrounds, with a basic ability to understand and shape the ideation and implementation of sound energy policy. Building on case studies of both aspirational and reactive US energy policy-making, students will design their own policy proposals for new, ambitious and achievable goals that advance a sustainable and prosperous future.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 320: Nanocharacterization of Materials

Current methods of directly examining the microstructure of materials. Topics: optical microscopy, scanning electron and focused ion beam microscopy, field ion microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, and microanalytical surface science methods. Emphasis is on the electron-optical techniques. Recommended: 193/203.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MATSCI 331: Atom-based computational methods for materials

Introduction to atom-based computational methods for materials with emphasis on quantum methods. Topics include density functional theory, tight-binding and empirical approaches. Computation of optical, electronic, phonon properties. Bulk materials, interfaces, nanostructures. Molecular dynamics. Prerequisites - undergraduate quantum mechanics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reed, E. (PI); Rehn, D. (TA)

MATSCI 358: Fracture and Fatigue of Materials and Thin Film Structures

Linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics from a materials science perspective, emphasizing microstructure and the micromechanisms of fracture. Plane strain fracture toughness and resistance curve behavior. Mechanisms of failure associated with cohesion and adhesion in bulk materials, composites, and thin film structures. Fracture mechanics approaches to toughening and subcritical crack-growth processes, with examples and applications involving cyclic fatigue and environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth. Prerequisite: 151/251, 198/208, or equivalent. SCPD offering.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 382: Biochips and Medical Imaging (EE 225, SBIO 225)

The course covers state-of-the-art and emerging bio-sensors, bio-chips, imaging modalities, and nano-therapies which will be studied in the context of human physiology including the nervous system, circulatory system and immune system. Medical diagnostics will be divided into bio-chips (in-vitro diagnostics) and medical and molecular imaging (in-vivo imaging). In-depth discussion on cancer and cardiovascular diseases and the role of diagnostics and nano-therapies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 400: Participation in Materials Science Teaching

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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