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BIOS 205: Introduction to R for Data Analysis

Autumn quarter enrollment limited to ADVANCE students; instructor consent required for enrollment. Topics include: basics of R (widely used, open-source programming and data analysis environment) programming language and data structures, reading/writing files, graphics tools for figure generation, basic statistical and regression operations, survey of relevant R library packages. Interactive format combining lectures and computer lab. For course and enrollment information, see https://web.stanford.edu/~sbagley2/bios205/
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 318: Quantitative Social Science Research Methods

An introduction to a broad range of social science research methods that are widely used in PhD work. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 339: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (POLISCI 421K, PSYCH 231)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

DESINST 215: The Design of Data

Our world is increasingly complex and laden with many forms of measurable data. Infographics abound, but whether explicit or not, the stories they tell are all designed. In this hyper-concentrated, hands-on course, students will learn to use mapping and design techniques to sort and synthesize data, unlock insights and communicate information. We will create four different types of maps and infographics and students will practice finding insight from both qualitative and quantitative information. Take this course if you are interested in learning how to navigate through and create for the complicated intersection of data and design.nnAdmission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classesn for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 292: Quantitative Methods for Empirical Research

This is an advanced course on quantitative methods for empirical research. Students are expected to have taken a course in linear models before. In this course I will discuss modern econometric methods for nonlinear models, including maximum likelihood and generalized method of moments. The emphasis will be on how these methods are used in sophisticated empirical work in social sciences. Special topics include discrete choice models and methods for estimating treatment effects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 242: Workshop on Instrument Development for Assessment, Research or Evaluation Purposes I

This course is designed with the belief that collecting information is a routine activity in which most researchers and educators are involved. Developing and improving instruments to gather information for descriptive, assessment, research, or evaluation purposes is a goal that unites all social sciences. Therefore, this course focuses on the technical skills required to develop, judge, and/or select quality instruments in diverse domains. The course will focus on your personal journey to develop or judge an instrument on something that is important for you.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI)

EDUC 252: Introduction to Test Theory

Concepts of reliability and validity; derivation and use of test scales and norms; mathematical models and procedures for test validation, scoring, and interpretation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Domingue, B. (PI)

EDUC 252L: Introduction to Test Theory - Lab

This course will cover the material from 252A in an applied setting. Emphasis will be in developing a capacity for applying and interpreting psychometrics techniques to real-world and simulated data.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Domingue, B. (PI)

EDUC 260A: Statistical Methods for Group Comparisons and Causal Inference (HRP 239, STATS 209)

See http://rogosateaching.com/stat209/. Critical examination of statistical methods in social science and life sciences applications, especially for cause and effect determinations. Topics: mediating and moderating variables, potential outcomes framework, encouragement designs, multilevel models, heterogeneous treatment effects, matching and propensity score methods, analysis of covariance, instrumental variables, compliance, path analysis and graphical models, group comparisons with longitudinal data. Prerequisite: intermediate-level statistical methods.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 260B: Advanced Statistical Methods for Observational Studies (CHPR 290, HRP 292, STATS 266)

Design principles and statistical methods for observational studies. Topics include: matching methods, sensitivity analysis, and instrumental variables. 3 unit registration requires a small project and presentation. Computing is in R. Pre-requisites: HRP 261 and 262 or STAT 209 ( HRP 239), or equivalent. See http://rogosateaching.com/somgen290/
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EDUC 265: History of Higher Education in the U.S. (AMSTUD 165, EDUC 165, HISTORY 158C)

Major periods of evolution, particularly since the mid-19th century. Premise: insights into contemporary higher education can be obtained through its antecedents, particularly regarding issues of governance, mission, access, curriculum, and the changing organization of colleges and universities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Labaree, D. (PI)

EDUC 278: Introduction to Issues in Evaluation

Open to master's and doctoral students with priority to students in the School of Education. Focus is on the basic literature and major theoretical and practical issues in the field of program evaluation. Topics include: defining purpose, obtaining credible evidence, the role of the evaluator, working with stakeholder, values in evaluation, utilization, and professional standards. The course project is to design an evaluation for a complex national or international program selected by the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI)

EDUC 326: Advanced Regression Analysis

Social science researchers often deal with complex data and research questions that traditional statistics models like linear regression cannot adequately address. This course offers the opportunity to understand and apply two widely used types of advanced regression analysis that allow the examination of 1) multilevel data structures (multilevel models) and 2) multivariate research questions (structural equation models).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, S. (PI)

EDUC 334A: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Practice

(Same as LAW 660A). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Koski, W. (PI)

EDUC 347: The Economics of Higher Education

(Same as GSBGEN 348) Topics: the worth of college and graduate degrees, and the utilization of highly educated graduates; faculty labor markets, careers, and workload; costs and pricing; discounting, merit aid, and access to higher education; sponsored research; academic medical centers; and technology and productivity. Emphasis is on theoretical frameworks, policy matters, and the concept of higher education as a public good. Stratification by gender, race, and social class.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bettinger, E. (PI)

EDUC 351A: Statistical Methods for Longitudinal Research (STATS 222)

See http://rogosateaching.com/stat222/. Research designs and statistical procedures for time-ordered (repeated-measures) data. The analysis of longitudinal panel data is central to empirical research on learning, development, aging, and the effects of interventions. Topics include: measurement of change, growth curve models, analysis of durations including survival analysis, experimental and non-experimental group comparisons, reciprocal effects, stability. Prerequisite: intermediate statistical methods
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rogosa, D. (PI)

EDUC 355: Higher Education and Society

For undergraduates and graduate students interested in what colleges and universities do, and what society expects of them. The relationship between higher education and society in the U.S. from a sociological perspective. The nature of reform and conflict in colleges and universities, and tensions in the design of higher education systems and organizations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stevens, M. (PI)

EDUC 399A: Designing Surveys

This workshop/course is designed for students who are designing a survey for use in a research project. The workshop content draws on relevant cognitive processing theories and research (on comprehension, retrieval, judgment, and reporting). In addition to some readings and a few lectures, this workshop is designed to be highly interactive and practical. By the end of the course students will have designed and pilot tested their survey instrument. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Porteus, A. (PI)

EDUC 401A: Mini Courses in Methodology: Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (SPSS)

Statistical analysis using SPSS, including generating descriptive statistics, drawing graphs, calculating correlation coefficients, conducting t-tests, analysis of variance, and linear regression. Building up datasets, preparing datasets for analysis, conducting statistical analysis, and interpreting results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stenhaug, B. (PI)

EDUC 401B: Mini Courses in Methodology: Stata

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the Stata statistical software package for use in quantitative research. By the end of the course, students should be able to import and export data, clean and manage data, conduct standard statistical tests (e.g., correlation, t-test, regression), and produce a graph.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stenhaug, B. (PI)

EDUC 401D: Multilevel Modeling Using R (STATS 196A)

See http://rogosateaching.com/stat196/ . Multilevel data analysis examples using R. Topics include: two-level nested data, growth curve modeling, generalized linear models for counts and categorical data, nonlinear models, three-level analyses. Class meets April 11, April 18, April 25, May 2, May 16.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rogosa, D. (PI)

EDUC 450C: Qualitative Interviewing

Addressing the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative interviews as well as the application of theory to practice, this course considers different approaches to interviewing. Interview types covered will range from group interviews to individual interviews, and from unstructured, ethnographically oriented interviews to highly structured interviews. Working with community partners to facilitate application to practice, the students will move from theory to interview design, implementation, and initial stages of analysis, with an emphasis on consistency in approach and utility in graduate-level research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ardoin, N. (PI)

EFSLANG 683P: Workshop in Pronunciation for International Students

(1-2 units). Provides support in the development of clear, comprehensible English pronunciation. Includes attention to individual sounds as well as stress, rhythm, and intonation. Students taking the course for 3 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Broeder, M. (PI)

EFSLANG 683R: Workshop in Reading and Vocabulary for International Students

(1-2 units). Provides support in the development of English reading skills for academic purposes, including work on comprehension, speed, and critical interpretation, along with strategies for improving vocabulary. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; QUIJANO, L. (PI)

EFSLANG 683S: Workshop in Oral Communication for International Students

(1-2 units) Provides support in the development of listening and speaking skills in English, including academic listening, small group discussion, oral presentation, and intercultural communication. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Broeder, M. (PI)

EFSLANG 683W: Workshop in Written Communication for International Students

(1-2 units). Provides support in the development of English writing skills for non-natives. Writing assignments are negotiated with the instructor and may include practice in composition, SAT or TOEFL writing, and writing university application essays and statements of purpose. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; QUIJANO, L. (PI)

EFSLANG 688: Intensive English and Academic Orientation for Foreign Graduate Students

Goal is to prepare incoming international graduate students for full-time study. Academic orientation and instruction in academic writing, listening, discussion, oral presentation, and spoken usage. Enrollment limited to 14. Course may be repeated once.
Terms: Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rylance, C. (SI)

EFSLANG 688A: Intensive Spoken English

For current graduate students. Includes work on listening, oral presentation, discussion, and conversational interaction. May fulfill any two of the following EFS requirements, subject to approval by the EFS Director: EFSLANG 690A, 690B, 691, 693B.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rylance, C. (PI)

EFSLANG 688B: Intensive Academic Writing

For current graduate students. Focus on academic writing, with some work in reading and vocabulary development. Engineering, science, humanities, and social science students prepare a research paper; business students write one or more case studies. Fulfills requirement for EFSLANG 697 or 698A, subject to approval by the EFSLANG Director.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rylance, C. (PI)

EFSLANG 689P: Pronunciation

The sounds of English, and stress, intonation, and rhythm patterns important to natural-sounding speech. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, D. (PI)

EFSLANG 689V: Vocabulary and Idiom

Building vocabulary for academic success. Idiomatic language, and what idioms and metaphors reflect about American culture. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 690A: Interacting in English

Strategies for communicating effectively in social and academic settings. Informal and formal language used in campus settings, including starting and maintaining conversations, asking questions, making complaints, and contributing ideas and opinions. Simulations and discussions, with feedback on pronunciation, grammar, and usage. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 690B: Academic Discussion

Skills for effective participation in classroom settings, seminars, and research group meetings. Pronunciation, grammar, and appropriateness for specific tasks. Feedback on language and communication style. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 690A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 690C: Advanced Interacting in English

Communication skills for extended discourse such as storytelling and presenting supported arguments. Development of interactive listening facility and overall intelligibility and accuracy. Goal is advanced fluency in classroom, professional and social settings. Identification of and attention to individual patterned errors. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 690B or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Streichler, S. (PI)

EFSLANG 691: Oral Presentation

For advanced graduate students. Practice in academic presentation skills; strategy, design, organization, and use of visual aids. Focus is on improving fluency and delivery style, with videotaping for feedback on language accuracy and usage. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 691S: Oral Presentation

For advanced graduate students. Practice in academic presentation skills; strategy, design, organization, and use of visual aids. Focus is on improving fluency and delivery style, with video recording for feedback on language accuracy and usage. Fulfills the requirement for EFSLANG 691.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Streichler, S. (PI)

EFSLANG 693A: Listening Comprehension

Strategies for effective listening in an academic setting, focusing on identifying key ideas in lectures. Practice in understanding words and phrases commonly encountered in classroom settings. Computer-based exercises for comprehension of rapid, natural speech. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 693B: Advanced Listening Comprehension, and Vocabulary Development

Listening strategies and vocabulary for understanding English in academic and non-academic contexts. Discussion and interpretation of communicative intent. Computer-based and video exercises across a range of genres; individual project. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 693A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 695A: Pronunciation and Intonation

Recognition and practice of American English sounds, stress, and intonation patterns for greater comprehension and intelligibility. Analysis of problem areas. Biweekly tape assignments and tutorials. May be repeated once for credit. Enrollment limted to 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mawson, C. (PI); Wang, D. (PI)

EFSLANG 695B: Advanced Pronunciation and Intonation

Continuation of EFSLANG 695A, focusing on American English sounds, stress, rhythm, and intonation patterns. Emphasis is on self-monitoring, integrated with short presentations. Biweekly tape assignments and tutorials. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated for credit three times. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 695A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mawson, C. (PI)

EFSLANG 695S: Pronunciation and Intonation

Recognition and practice of American English sounds, stress, and intonation patterns for greater comprehension and intelligibility. Analysis of problem areas. Biweekly tape assignments and tutorials. Fulfills the requirement for EFSLANG 695A.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, D. (PI)

EFSLANG 697: Gateway to Graduate Writing

Focus is on improving grammatical accuracy and vocabulary, building fluency, and learning the structure and conventions of English correspondence, reports, and short academic papers. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Geda, K. (PI)

EFSLANG 698A: Writing Academic English

Strategies and conventions for graduate writing. Emphasis is on fluency, organization, documentation, and appropriateness for writing tasks required in course work. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 698B: Advanced Graduate Writing

Focus on clarity, accuracy, and appropriate style. For graduate students experienced in English writing and currently required to write for courses and research. Class meetings and individual conferences. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 698A. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 698C: Writing and Presenting Research

For advanced graduate students completing major research projects. Revising and editing strategies for preparing papers, conference abstracts, and poster presentations. Practice adapting written and oral presentational content and style to different audiences. Students present their research and receive instructor and peer feedback, with regular individual tutorials in addition to class work. Enrollment limited to 12. May be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Students required by the EFS Placement Exam to take EFSLANG 691, 697, 698A, or 698B may not enroll in 698C until those requirements have been fulfilled. Others may sign up directly.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hubbard, P. (PI)

EFSLANG 698S: Writing Academic English

Strategies and conventions for graduate writing. Emphasis is on fluency, organization, documentation, and appropriateness for writing tasks required in course work and in producing research papers. Fulfills the requirement for EFSLANG 698A.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Streichler, S. (PI)

ENGR 202W: Technical Writing

How to write clear, concise, and well-ordered technical prose. Principles of editing for structure and style. Applications to a variety of genres in engineering and science.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Harrison, K. (PI)

HISTORY 399A: Preparing for International Field Work: Public Service or Research (HISTORY 299X)

Open to students in all classes, those planning internships abroad and those planning research, from juniors with honors theses and sophomores with Chappell Lougee grants to freshmen thinking ahead. Introduces resources on campus for planning international research and service. Raises issues that need to be considered in advance of going abroad: ethical concerns, Human Subjects Protocol, networking, personal safety and gender issues, confronting cultural differences. Exposes students to research methods: case studies, interviewing, working in foreign libraries and archives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 223: Introduction to Data Management and Analysis in SAS

Provides hands-on introduction to basic data management and analysis techniques using SAS. Data management topics include: Introduction to SAS and SAS syntax, importing data, creating and reading SAS datasets, data cleaning and validation, creating new variables, and combining data sets. Analysis techniques include: basic descriptive statistics (e.g., means, frequency) and bivariate procedures for continuous and categorical variables (e.g., t-tests, chi-squares).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Park, L. (PI); Popat, R. (PI)

HUMSCI 201: Graduate Environment of Support

Psychosocial, financial, and career issues in adapting graduate students to Stanford; how these issues relate to diversity, resources, policies, and procedures. Discussions among faculty, advanced graduate students, campus resource people, and the dean's office. (Thomas)
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Thomas, A. (PI)

ORALCOMM 219: Oral Communication for Graduate Students

(Formerly CTL 219.) Graduate student speaking activities such as teaching (delivering lectures, guiding discussion, and facilitating small groups), professional presentations and conference papers, and preparing for oral exams and defenses. In-class projects, discussion, and individual evaluation assist students in developing effective techniques for improving oral communication skills.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Allen, D. (PI)

POLISCI 421K: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (COMM 339, PSYCH 231)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

PSYCH 231: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (COMM 339, POLISCI 421K)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

SOC 280B: Introduction to Data Analysis (CSRE 180B, SOC 180B)

Methods for analyzing and evaluating quantitative data in sociological research. Students will be taught how to run and interpret multivariate regressions, how to test hypotheses, and how to read and critique published data analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jackson, M. (PI)

STATS 200: Introduction to Statistical Inference

Modern statistical concepts and procedures derived from a mathematical framework. Statistical inference, decision theory; point and interval estimation, tests of hypotheses; Neyman-Pearson theory. Bayesian analysis; maximum likelihood, large sample theory. Prerequisite: 116. http://statweb.stanford.edu/~sabatti/Stat200/index.html
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 202: Data Mining and Analysis

Data mining is used to discover patterns and relationships in data. Emphasis is on large complex data sets such as those in very large databases or through web mining. Topics: decision trees, association rules, clustering, case based methods, and data visualization. Prereqs: Introductory courses in statistics or probability (e.g., Stats 60), linear algebra (e.g., Math 51), and computer programming (e.g., CS 105).
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 203: Introduction to Regression Models and Analysis of Variance

Modeling and interpretation of observational and experimental data using linear and nonlinear regression methods. Model building and selection methods. Multivariable analysis. Fixed and random effects models. Experimental design. Pre- or corequisite: 200.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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