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COMPLIT 10N: Shakespeare and Performance in a Global Context

Preference to freshmen. The problem of performance including the performance of gender through the plays of Shakespeare. In-class performances by students of scenes from plays. The history of theatrical performance. Sources include filmed versions of plays, and readings on the history of gender, gender performance, and transvestite theater.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Parker, P. (PI)

COMPLIT 27Q: You Are Here: Writing in the Age of Environmental Crisis

How have writers on a global scale responded to a growing sense of environmental crisis? How do various literary genres and forms help writers convey a sense of urgency, evoke feelings of loss, or prompt a call to action? Students will encounter recent stories, songs, memoirs, essays, and poems by writers from around the world that engage with the relationship between humans and our precarious environment. Texts such as Cormac McCarthy¿s post-apocalyptic novel The Road, Inger Christensen¿s long poem alphabet, and Arundati Roy¿s fable ¿The Briefing¿ will allow us to see how race, class, and region impact experiences and depictions of a planet in crisis. These texts will also model options for students¿ own creative writing on nature, place, and crisis across genres. Assignments will include observational writing, experiments with genre shifts, and research and writing on the places we call home as members of a global community.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tate, B. (PI)

COMPLIT 55N: Batman, Hamilton, Díaz, and Other Wondrous Lives

This seminar concerns the design and analysis of imaginary (or constructed) worlds for narratives and media such as films, comics, and literary texts. The seminar's primary goal is to help participants understand the creation of better imaginary worlds - ultimately all our efforts should serve that higher purpose. Some of the things we will consider when taking on the analysis of a new world include: What are its primary features - spatial, cultural, biological, fantastic, cosmological? What is the world's ethos (the guiding beliefs or ideals that characterize the world)? What are the precise strategies that are used by the artist to convey the world to us and us to the world? How are our characters connected to the world? And how are we - the viewer or reader or player - connected to the world?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Saldivar, J. (PI)

COMPLIT 102: Film Series: Understanding Turkey Through Film (COMPLIT 302)

Join us in our quest to understand the recent developments in Turkey and their impact on its people through cinematic production. Set against the backdrop of Turkey's cultural, political and social transformation in the last decade, the movies in this series tell the uneasy stories of individuals whose lives are affected by this disruptive change. By examining the link between individual troubles and public issues, the films confront issues such as globalization, gender and racial hierarchy, neo-liberal urban transformation, male domination, state oppression, and women's oppression in Turkey. Each screening will be followed by a discussion lead by invited scholars of Turkey or film directors. At each screening we will look closely at a film and discuss how the directors and script writers responded to larger scale cultural and social dynamics to present them as personal stories. Enrolled students must attend all five screenings and at least three talks of their choice at the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies annual conference Understanding Turkey: Vision, Revision, and the Future which will be held on April 28-29 2017. All screenings are free and open to the public. All attendees are encouraged to participate in the post-screening discussions. All films are in Turkish with English subtitles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Karahan, B. (PI)

COMPLIT 110: Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies (COMPLIT 310, FEMGEN 110X, FEMGEN 310X)

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1880s to today: Oscar Wilde, Rachilde, Radclyffe Hall, Djuna Barnes, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga, Jeanette Winterson, Alison Bechdel and others, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dierkes-Thrun, P. (PI)

COMPLIT 123: The Novel, the Global South (DLCL 143, ENGLISH 184)

Literary inventiveness and social significance of novelistic forms from the Great Depression to the present. The seminar will focus on texts by William Faulkner, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Toni Morrison, and Junot Diaz.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 127B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (JEWISHST 147B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 138A: Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture (JAPAN 138, JAPAN 238)

This class introduces key literary texts from Japan's modern era (1868-present), locating these works in the larger political, social, and cultural trends of the period. Primary texts include: Futabatei Shimei's Floating Clouds, Higuchi Ichiyô's Child's Play, Natsume Sôseki's Kokoro, Kobayashi Takiji's Cannery Boat, Ôe Kenzaburô's The Catch, and Yoshimoto Banana's Kitchen. Examination of these literary works will be contextualized within larger political trends (e.g., the modernization program of the Meiji regime, the policies of Japan's wartime government, and postwar Japanese responses to the cold war), social developments (e.g., changing notions of social class, the women's rights movement, and the social effects of the postwar economic expansion), and cultural movements (e.g., literary reform movement of the 1890s, modernism of the 1920s and 30s, and postmodernism of the 1980s). The goal of the class is to use literary texts as a point of entry to understand the grand narrative of Japan's journey from its tentative re-entry into the international community in the 1850s, through the cataclysm of the Pacific War, to the remarkable prosperity of the bubble years in the 1980s.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Reichert, J. (PI)

COMPLIT 151B: Great Books: Dramatic Traditions (COMPLIT 351B, TAPS 151T, TAPS 351)

The most influential and enduring texts in the dramatic canon from Sophocles to Shakespeare, Chekhov to Soyinka. Their historical and geopolitical contexts. Questions about the power dynamics involved in the formation of canons. This course counts as a Writing in the Major course for TAPS in 2016-17.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 154A: Film & Philosophy (FRENCH 154, ITALIAN 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 210B: Cinematic Neorealism (COMPLIT 310B, ITALIAN 210, ITALIAN 310)

The course will consist in a close reading and theoretical assessment of a much celebrated body of films by Rossellini, De Sica, Visconti, Pasolini, and others, subtitled in English. The seminar aims to provide students with the instruments of film analysis; to engage in the study of the aesthetics, ethics, and politics of this distinctive filmic style; to debate current definitions of realism and neorealism. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 219: Dostoevsky: Narrative Performance and Literary Theory (SLAVIC 251)

In-depth engagement with a range of Dostoevsky's genres: early works (epistolary novella Poor Folk and experimental Double), major novels (Crime and Punishment, The Idiot), less-read shorter works ("A Faint Heart," "Bobok," and "The Meek One"), and genre-bending House of the Dead and Diary of a Writer. Course applies recent theory of autobiography, performance, repetition and narrative gaps, to Dostoevsky's transformations of genre, philosophical and dramatic discourse, and narrative performance. Slavic students read primary texts in Russian, other participants in translation. Course conducted in English. For graduate students; undergraduates with advanced linguistic and critical competence may enroll with consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Greenleaf, M. (PI)

COMPLIT 220: Renaissance Africa (AFRICAST 220E, ILAC 220E, ILAC 320E)

Literature and Portuguese expansion into Africa during the sixteenth century. Emphasis on forms of exchange between Portuguese and Africans in Morocco, Angola/Congo, South Africa, the Swahili Coast, and Ethiopia. Readings in Portuguese and English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barletta, V. (PI)

COMPLIT 223: Literature and Human Experimentation (AFRICAAM 223, CSRE 123B, HUMBIO 175H, MED 220)

This course introduces students to the ways literature has been used to think through the ethics of human subjects research and experimental medicine. We will focus primarily on readings that imaginatively revisit experiments conducted on vulnerable populations: namely groups placed at risk by their classification according to perceived human and cultural differences. We will begin with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), and continue our study via later works of fiction, drama and literary journalism, including Toni Morrison's Beloved, David Feldshuh's Miss Evers Boys, Hannah Arendt's Eichmann and Vivien Spitz's Doctors from Hell, Rebecca Skloot's Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go. Each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical and policy writings of the period; and our ultimate goal will be to understand modes of ethics deliberation that are possible via creative uses of the imagination, and literature's place in a history of ethical thinking about humane research and care.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 237A: Jesters, Cross-dressers, and Rebels: A Subversive History of Persian Literature

This course seeks to offer an alternative history of Persian literature from the Middle Ages to the present by looking at literary forms and figures that are not part of the canon: the counter-classical traditions of parody and satire, the folk genres of shadow play and takhteh-howzi, the theatrical art of wandering minstrels, 20th century revolutionary songs, etc. We will be tracing the burlesque, scatological, carnivalesque, and, more generally, irreverent in Persian literature and see how these elements subvert established social norms and political orders. Even though the course will draw on materials from Persian literature and culture, the aim is broader: to ask questions about power, hierarchies, censorship, the formation of a literary canon through the exclusion of certain narratives, the role of humour and laughter, the subversive force of the female - even as a cross-dresser - in public performance, and profanity as a tool of protest against the hegemonic order. Open to undergraduates and graduates. Taught in English. If desired, selected readings can be provided in Persian.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 247: Bollywood and Beyond: An Introduction to Indian Film (FILMSTUD 250B, GLOBAL 250)

A broad engagement with Indian cinema: its relationship with Indian politics, history, and economics; its key thematic concerns and forms; and its adaptation of and response to global cinematic themes, genres, and audiences. Locating the films within key critical and theoretical debates and scholarship on Indian and world cinemas. Goal is to open up what is often seen as a dauntingly complex region, especially for those who are interested in but unfamiliar with its histories and cultural forms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mediratta, S. (PI)

COMPLIT 248C: Advanced Turkish-English Translation

This course is the continuation of COMPLIT 248A Reading Turkish I and COMPLIT 248B Reading Turkish II. Refining advanced grammar, reading, and translation skills in modern Turkish through intensive reading and translation from a variety of source texts. Emphasis on Turkish cultural, historical, literary, and political texts depending on students' academic interests. Prerequisites COMPLIT 248A & B or prior knowledge of Turkish and consultation with the instructor is necessary.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Karahan, B. (PI)

COMPLIT 249C: Contemporary Iranian Theater (GLOBAL 249C)

Today, Iranian plays¿both in traditional and contemporary styles¿are staged in theater festivals throughout the world and play their role in forming a universal language of theater which combine the heritages from countries in all five continents. Despite many obstacles, some Iranian plays have been translated into English and some prominent Iranian figures are successful stage directors outside Iran. Forty-six years ago when "Theater in Iran" (a monograph on the history of Iranian plays) by Bahram Beyzaie was first published, it put the then contemporary Iranian theater movement¿which was altogether westernizing itself blindly¿face to face with a new kind of self-awareness. Hence, today's generation of playwrights and stage directors in Iran, all know something of their theatrical heritage. In this course we will spend some class sessions on the history of theater in Iran and some class meetings will be concentrating on contemporary movements and present day playwrights. Given the dearth of visual documents, an attempt will be made to present a picture of Iranian theater to the student. Students are expected to read the recommended available translated plays of the contemporary Iranian playwrights and participate in classroom discussions. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Beyzaie, B. (PI)

COMPLIT 260B: Love and Negativity in Medieval Persian Mysticism

An analysis of apophatic discourses of love in medieval Persian mystical texts, 800-1300 AD. The philosophical underpinnings and implications of Sufi thought are discussed in this course. The principal aim, however, is to shed light on the radical poetic force of the Persian texts. Topics to be addressed include the fundamentally oral, temporal nature of mystic speech; the relation of the speaking I to the unknown and unknowable Other; the discourse of love in which God and the beloved are one; the linguistic fragmentation of mystical discourse, straining against the edges of meaning; the possibility of salvaging mystical experience in language; and, finally, the question of apophasis as a theologically and politically subversive act. Primary readings include texts on and by Bayazid Bastami (800-874), Mansur al-Hallaj (857-922), Ayn al-Qozat al-Hamadani (1098-1131), Ruzbihan Baqli (1128-1209), Farid al-Din Attar (1145/46-1221), Shahab ad-Din al-Suhrawardi (1154-1191), and Jalal al-Din Rumi (d. 1273). These texts will be complemented by readings from Georges Bataille, Maurice Blanchot, Michel de Certeau, Jacques Derrida, Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, Emmanuel Levinas, and Paul Ricoeur, among others. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 270: Poetess (Obsolete): Women Poets Take Back Time

Is there a tradition of women poets creating forms against the grain of their time? Close reading of women poets in conjunction with short readings in philosophy of time (Kant, Kierkegaard, Bergson, Heidegger). Syllabus includes Sappho, Dickinson, G Mistral, M Moore, E Bishop, Akhmatova, Tsvetaeva, Plath, N Sachs, G Brooks, Harjo, Cisneros, Szymborska, Students will introduce their favorites. Last weeks: living poet-performers, including our own Stanford talent. Poetry party/Symposium at end.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Greenleaf, M. (PI)

COMPLIT 302: Film Series: Understanding Turkey Through Film (COMPLIT 102)

Join us in our quest to understand the recent developments in Turkey and their impact on its people through cinematic production. Set against the backdrop of Turkey's cultural, political and social transformation in the last decade, the movies in this series tell the uneasy stories of individuals whose lives are affected by this disruptive change. By examining the link between individual troubles and public issues, the films confront issues such as globalization, gender and racial hierarchy, neo-liberal urban transformation, male domination, state oppression, and women's oppression in Turkey. Each screening will be followed by a discussion lead by invited scholars of Turkey or film directors. At each screening we will look closely at a film and discuss how the directors and script writers responded to larger scale cultural and social dynamics to present them as personal stories. Enrolled students must attend all five screenings and at least three talks of their choice at the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies annual conference Understanding Turkey: Vision, Revision, and the Future which will be held on April 28-29 2017. All screenings are free and open to the public. All attendees are encouraged to participate in the post-screening discussions. All films are in Turkish with English subtitles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Karahan, B. (PI)

COMPLIT 310: Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies (COMPLIT 110, FEMGEN 110X, FEMGEN 310X)

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1880s to today: Oscar Wilde, Rachilde, Radclyffe Hall, Djuna Barnes, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga, Jeanette Winterson, Alison Bechdel and others, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dierkes-Thrun, P. (PI)

COMPLIT 310B: Cinematic Neorealism (COMPLIT 210B, ITALIAN 210, ITALIAN 310)

The course will consist in a close reading and theoretical assessment of a much celebrated body of films by Rossellini, De Sica, Visconti, Pasolini, and others, subtitled in English. The seminar aims to provide students with the instruments of film analysis; to engage in the study of the aesthetics, ethics, and politics of this distinctive filmic style; to debate current definitions of realism and neorealism. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 320A: Epic and Empire (ENGLISH 314)

Focus is on Virgil's Aeneid and its influence, tracing the European epic tradition (Ariosto, Tasso, Camoes, Spenser, and Milton) to New World discovery and mercantile expansion in the early modern period.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Parker, P. (PI)

COMPLIT 334B: Concepts of Modernity II: Culture, Aesthetics, and Society in the Age of Globalization (ENGLISH 334B, MTL 334B)

Emphasis on world-system theory, theories of coloniality and power, and aesthetic modernity/postmodernity in their relation to culture broadly understood.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rasberry, V. (PI)

COMPLIT 351B: Great Books: Dramatic Traditions (COMPLIT 151B, TAPS 151T, TAPS 351)

The most influential and enduring texts in the dramatic canon from Sophocles to Shakespeare, Chekhov to Soyinka. Their historical and geopolitical contexts. Questions about the power dynamics involved in the formation of canons. This course counts as a Writing in the Major course for TAPS in 2016-17.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 352A: The Novel in Africa (AFRICAAM 352)

A study of the novel as generic form and site of theorization for African writers and scholars of literature, via close reading of key works of fiction and critical analysis. We will consider the place of historical and cultural context in creative and artistic production, publication, and reception within the continent and beyond it. We will certainly pay close attention to innovation at the level of form, theme, plot, characterization, style or poetics. But we will also attend to questions that arise with the formation of African literature as an autonomous corpus and field, including those critical questions that concern uses of orality, performance, and tradition as indices of authenticity; the challenges and possibilities of language; and the common presumption of the nation as realist or allegorical frame, as well as its complex relationship to class, gender, and ethnic minoritization.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

COMPLIT 398L: Literary Lab (ENGLISH 398L)

Gathering and analyzing data, constructing hypotheses and designing experiments to test them, writing programs [if needed], preparing visuals and texts for articles or conferences. Requires a year-long participation in the activities of the Lab.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Algee-Hewitt, M. (PI)
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