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HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Como, D. (PI); Lilje, N. (TA)

HISTORY 7D: Rise and Fall of Atlantic Slavery, 1500 to 1900 (AFRICAAM 107D, HISTORY 107D)

Between 1500 and 1900, about 12 million people were forcibly removed from Africa and transported to the Americas to work as slaves. This course explores the history of racial slavery in the Atlantic world and its lasting significance. Topics include the Middle Passage, the development of racism, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the slave experience, resistance, African-American cultures, abolitionism, the process of emancipation, reparations, and the perpetuation of slavery and other forms of unfree labor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 7S: Stanford Collects: A History of Collecting (ARTHIST 278S)

Leland Stanford, Jr. was a curator extraordinaire. His collecting shaped Stanford into a university, an archive, a library, and a museum. Students will explore Stanford's campus collections to discover how objects and artifacts tell the history not only of the university, but also Palo Alto, California, and the American West writ large. The course is hosted in Green Library and features visits to the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University Archaeology Collections, and more. All majors welcome. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Toledano, A. (PI)

HISTORY 10N: Thinking About War

This course examines classic approaches to war as an intellectual problem, looking at how a matter of such great physical violence and passions can be subjected to understanding and used in philosophy, political theory, and art. Questions to be examined include the definition of war, its causes, its moral value, the nature of its participants, its use in the self-definition of individuals and societies, its relation to political authority, warfare and gender, and the problem of civil war.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 14N: Making the Middle Ages

Through hands-on engagement with Stanford¿s diverse collections of medieval artifacts-- from grungy coins to lavish manuscripts-- this course offers an introduction to the cultures of Europe and the Mediterranean world from 400-1400 CE. In addition, the course will explore competing contemporary understandings of the "Middle Ages" and the role of the "medieval" in shaping what it means to be "modern".
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 16: Traders and Crusaders in the Medieval Mediterranean (HISTORY 116)

Trade and crusade were inextricably interconnected in the high Middle Ages. As merchant ships ferried knights and pilgrims across the Mediterranean, rulers borrowed heavily to finance their expeditions, while military expansion opened new economic opportunities. Course themes include the origins of the Crusading movement; the rise of Venice and other maritime powers; the pivotal roles of the Byzantine and Mongol Empires; relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews; new military, maritime, and commercial technologies; and the modern legacy of the Crusades.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 20A: The Russian Empire, 1450-1800

(Same as HISTORY 120A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 120A.) Explores rise of Russian state and expanse of empire; patterns of governance of a Eurasian empire; strategies and institutions of governance; survey of various ethnic and religious groups in empire and their varied cultures and political economies; gender and family; serfdom; Russian Orthodox religion and culture; reforms and Europeanization of 18th century.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 22S: From 'superfluous women' to the 'Yolocaust': The Experience of War in 20th Century Europe (JEWISHST 22S)

Through a variety of primary sources, including diaries, photographs, letters, and artifacts this course explores the multiplicity of ways in which Europeans experienced the great conflicts that swept the continent in the 20th century. The unprecedented impact of these wars will be traced in stories of those whose voices have been marginalized in conventional historiography. This course encourages and guides students in their first forays into archival work in a hands-on approach to developing ways of thinking historically.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Szymkow, B. (PI)

HISTORY 23N: The Soviet Union and the World: View from the Hoover Archives

This course seeks to explore the Soviet Union's influence on the world from 1917 to its end in 1991 from a variety of perspectives. Hoover Institution archival holdings will be the basic sources for the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 39: Modern Britain and the British Empire

(Same as HISTORY 139. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 139.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 40: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 140. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 45B: Africa in the Twentieth Century

(Same as HISTORY 145B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Getz, T. (PI)

HISTORY 48Q: South Africa: Contested Transitions (AFRICAAM 48Q)

Preference to sophomores. The inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president in May 1994 marked the end of an era and a way of life for South Africa. The changes have been dramatic, yet the legacies of racism and inequality persist. Focus: overlapping and sharply contested transitions. Who advocates and opposes change? Why? What are their historical and social roots and strategies? How do people reconstruct their society? Historical and current sources, including films, novels, and the Internet.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Samoff, J. (PI)

HISTORY 50B: Nineteenth Century America (AFRICAAM 50B, CSRE 50S)

(Same as HISTORY 150B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 52Q: Democracy in Crisis: Learning from the Past (EDUC 122Q, POLISCI 20Q)

This Sophomore Seminar will focus on U.S. democracy and will use a series of case studies of major events in our national history to explore what happened and why to American democracy at key pressure points. This historical exploration should shed light on how the current challenges facing American democracy might best be handled. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ehrlich, T. (PI)

HISTORY 54N: African American Women's Lives (AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, CSRE 54N, FEMGEN 54N)

This course encourages students to think critically about historical sources and to use creative and rigorous historical methods to recover African American women¿s experiences, which often have been placed on the periphery of American history and American life.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hobbs, A. (PI)

HISTORY 55D: The Asian American Movement: A History of Activism (AMSTUD 155D, ASNAMST 55D, ASNAMST 155D, HISTORY 155D)

The "Asian American Movement" was born in the late 1960s inspired by other movements for social change and justice in the era. Activism among Asians in America has a longer history and a continuity to today. We will examine past, present, and future and consider issues of racial/ethnic identity, of inequality, and of injustice. And we will explore avenues that sought remedy and progress. Political, social, cultural, gender and sexuality, and international dimensions will be considered.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 58Q: American Landscapes of Segregation (AFRICAAM 58Q, AMSTUD 58Q)

This course examines various landscapes of segregation in U.S. history from 19th century reconstruction and settler expansion through the contemporary U.S. security state. Each week we consider different histories of segregation including native reservation and boarding school stories, Jim Crow and post-World War II urban/suburban segregation, school integration and bussing, and the rise of the carceral state. We will ask: How have Americans moved through space with different degrees of freedom and constraint over time, and how has that shaped what it has meant to be an American in different ways for different groups? How has access to land, property, consumer, recreational and educational spaces and resources been regulated by categories of race, gender, sexuality, colonial subjectivity, immigrant status and class? To gain a better sense of our local history, we will also consider how structures of segregation have historically mapped the Bay Area. Sources include primary and secondary historic texts, feature and documentary films, photography, and poetry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hirshberg, L. (PI)

HISTORY 61N: The Worlds of Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson assumed many roles during his life-- Founding Father, revolutionary, and author of the Declaration of Independence; natural scientist, inventor, and political theorist; slaveholder, founder of a major political party, and President of the United States. This introductory seminar explores these many worlds of Jefferson, both to understand the multifaceted character of the man and the broader historical contexts that he inhabited and did so much to shape.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 63N: The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality (AMSTUD 63N, CSRE 63N, FEMGEN 63N)

This course explores the long history of ideas about gender and equality. Each week we read, dissect, compare, and critique a set of primary historical documents (political and literary) from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. We tease out changing arguments about education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, politics, and the very meaning of gender, and we place feminist critics within national and global political contexts.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 68S: New Orleans: An American City? (AFRICAAM 68S, AMSTUD 68S, URBANST 68S)

Some scholars argue that New Orleans is not quite an American city, but is instead a cultural hybrid of Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean. This course will investigate that claim by studying New Orleans from its colonial period to the present. Topics include colonial empires, the role of New Orleans as the largest slave market in North America, the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927, Civil Rights, Carnival, tourism, religion, and state and federal responses to Hurricane Katrina, among others.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Modica, J. (PI)

HISTORY 70C: Modern Latin America (HISTORY 170C)

This course examines Latin American history from independence to the present day. Key issues include nationalism, urbanization, culture, and revolution. Sources include writings in the social sciences as well as primary documents, fiction, and film.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Selvidge, S. (PI)

HISTORY 85B: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Visibility and Vulnerability (CSRE 85B, JEWISHST 85B, REES 85B)

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 90: Early Chinese Thought (HISTORY 190)

This lecture course examines the emergence of critical thought in early China. After a brief study of the social and political changes that made this emergence possible, it looks at the nature and roles of the thinkers, and finally their ideas about the social order, the state, war and the army, the family, the cosmos, and the self (both physical and mental). Some brief comparisons with early Greek thought.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 94B: Japan in the Age of the Samurai

(Same as HISTORY 194B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 194B.) From the Warring States Period to the Meiji Restoration. Topics include the three great unifiers, Tokugawa hegemony, the samurai class, Neoconfucian ideologies, suppression of Christianity, structures of social and economic control, frontiers, the other and otherness, castle-town culture, peasant rebellion, black marketing, print culture, the floating world, National Studies, food culture, samurai activism, black ships, unequal treaties, anti-foreign terrorism, restorationism, millenarianism, modernization as westernization, Japan as imagined community.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 101: The Greeks (CLASSICS 83)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 101.) 250 years ago, for almost the first time in history, a few societies rejected kings who claimed to know what the gods wanted and began moving toward democracy. Only once before had this happened--in ancient Greece. This course asks how the Greeks did this, and what they can teach us today. It uses texts and archaeology to trace the material and military sides of the story as well as cultural developments, and looks at Greek slavery and misogyny as well as their achievements. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 104D: International Security in a Changing World (IPS 241, POLISCI 114S)

This class examines the most pressing international security problems facing the world today: nuclear crises, nuclear non-proliferation, terrorism, and climate change. Alternative perspectives--from political science, history, and STS (Science, Technology, and Society) studies--are used to analyze these problems. The class includes an award-winning two-day international negotiation simulation.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 106B: Global Human Geography: Europe and Americas

Patterns of demography, economic and social development, geopolitics, and cultural differentiation. Use of maps to depict geographical patterns and processes.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI); Perez, J. (TA)

HISTORY 107D: Rise and Fall of Atlantic Slavery, 1500 to 1900 (AFRICAAM 107D, HISTORY 7D)

Between 1500 and 1900, about 12 million people were forcibly removed from Africa and transported to the Americas to work as slaves. This course explores the history of racial slavery in the Atlantic world and its lasting significance. Topics include the Middle Passage, the development of racism, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the slave experience, resistance, African-American cultures, abolitionism, the process of emancipation, reparations, and the perpetuation of slavery and other forms of unfree labor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 116: Traders and Crusaders in the Medieval Mediterranean (HISTORY 16)

Trade and crusade were inextricably interconnected in the high Middle Ages. As merchant ships ferried knights and pilgrims across the Mediterranean, rulers borrowed heavily to finance their expeditions, while military expansion opened new economic opportunities. Course themes include the origins of the Crusading movement; the rise of Venice and other maritime powers; the pivotal roles of the Byzantine and Mongol Empires; relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews; new military, maritime, and commercial technologies; and the modern legacy of the Crusades.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 120A: The Russian Empire, 1450-1800

(Same as HISTORY 20A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 120A.) Explores rise of Russian state and expanse of empire; patterns of governance of a Eurasian empire; strategies and institutions of governance; survey of various ethnic and religious groups in empire and their varied cultures and political economies; gender and family; serfdom; Russian Orthodox religion and culture; reforms and Europeanization of 18th century.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 139: Modern Britain and the British Empire

(Same as HISTORY 39. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 139.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 140: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 40. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 145B: Africa in the 20th Century (AFRICAAM 145B)

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Getz, T. (PI)

HISTORY 150B: Nineteenth Century America (AFRICAAM 150B, AMSTUD 150B, CSRE 150S)

(Same as HISTORY 50B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 152: History of American Law (HISTORY 352B)

(Formerly Law 318. Now Law 3504.) This course examines the growth and development of American legal institutions with particular attention to crime and punishment, slavery and race relations, the role of law in developing the economy, and the place of lawyers in American society, from colonial times to the present. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Final exam or paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Cross-listed with History (HISTORY 152 Consent of instructor required) & (HISTORY 352B).
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Friedman, L. (PI)

HISTORY 155D: The Asian American Movement: A History of Activism (AMSTUD 155D, ASNAMST 55D, ASNAMST 155D, HISTORY 55D)

The "Asian American Movement" was born in the late 1960s inspired by other movements for social change and justice in the era. Activism among Asians in America has a longer history and a continuity to today. We will examine past, present, and future and consider issues of racial/ethnic identity, of inequality, and of injustice. And we will explore avenues that sought remedy and progress. Political, social, cultural, gender and sexuality, and international dimensions will be considered.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 170C: Modern Latin America (HISTORY 70C)

This course examines Latin American history from independence to the present day. Key issues include nationalism, urbanization, culture, and revolution. Sources include writings in the social sciences as well as primary documents, fiction, and film.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Selvidge, S. (PI)

HISTORY 181B: Formation of the Contemporary Middle East

Focusing on the period from World War I to the recent past, the course emphasizes the eastern Arab world Egypt, greater Syria, and Iraq plus Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Iran, and Israel. Themes include: integration of the region into the world economy; imperialism and the formation of the contemporary state system; competing forms of identity (national states, pan-Arab nationalism, Islam) and ideology (liberalism, Marxism, fascism, Islamism); changing gender relations; Palestine/Israel, decolonization, the Cold War; the transition from British to U.S. hegemony; and several contemporary crises.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 185B: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Vulnerability and Visibility (CSRE 185B, HISTORY 385C, JEWISHST 185B, REES 185B)

(Same as HISTORY 85B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 190: Early Chinese Thought (HISTORY 90)

This lecture course examines the emergence of critical thought in early China. After a brief study of the social and political changes that made this emergence possible, it looks at the nature and roles of the thinkers, and finally their ideas about the social order, the state, war and the army, the family, the cosmos, and the self (both physical and mental). Some brief comparisons with early Greek thought.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 194B: Japan in the Age of the Samurai

(Same as HISTORY 94B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 194B.) From the Warring States Period to the Meiji Restoration. Topics include the three great unifiers, Tokugawa hegemony, the samurai class, Neoconfucian ideologies, suppression of Christianity, structures of social and economic control, frontiers, the other and otherness, castle-town culture, peasant rebellion, black marketing, print culture, the floating world, National Studies, food culture, samurai activism, black ships, unequal treaties, anti-foreign terrorism, restorationism, millenarianism, modernization as westernization, Japan as imagined community.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 201K: A History of the Global Left: Revolutionary Movements against Empire (HISTORY 301K)

This class will trace the formation of trans-regional movements against imperialism in the modern period that helped create a "global Left." We will read contemporary works by thinkers such as Lord Byron, Karl Marx, Mohandas K. Gandhi, Annie Besant, and Faiz Ahmad Faiz, as well as historical studies of these figures and the movements in which they figured. Key topics include the American Revolution, the Indian "Mutiny" of 1857, the Ghadar movement, Pan-Islamism, Irish nationalism, and global communism.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 202J: Climate Change Controversies: Past, Present, Future (IPS 271)

Provides a unique perspective on contemporary debates about climate change through a study of their long history. After some background about climate science and a look at how people thought about climate in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries, we explore the co-evolution of climate science and climate politics from World War II to the present. The approach is to examine a series of political issues and debates that established human effects on the global atmosphere as serious problems. We then focus on the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the 2015 Paris Agreement, and the future of international climate policy. Assignments include in-class presentations and a policy brief.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Edwards, P. (PI)

HISTORY 203K: Trauma and History (CSRE 203H)

This course will examine trauma as a historical process, following the intergenerational impacts of history's darker dramas, analyzing collective strategies for coping and healing after trauma, and asking whether we can speak of "traumatized societies." Short readings and weekly discussions.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 206B: Intoxicated: Commodities & Globalization in the Early Modern World (HISTORY 306B)

Early modern Europe experienced an influx of foreign goods, including coffee, sugar, chocolate, tea, and drugs, that ushered in a new era of global commerce. Yet, these developments also had consequences: the large-scale enslavement and relocation of human beings and the violent subjugation of local populations in the name of empire. A wider range of goods from far-flung places entered the grasp of a larger swath of society, but from where, by what means, and at what cost?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dorner, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 206E: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 208A: Science and Law in History (HISTORY 308A)

How the intertwined modern fields of science and law, since the early modern period, together developed central notions of fact, evidence, experiment, demonstration, objectivity, and proof.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 209C: Liberalism and Violence (HISTORY 309C)

Does LIberalism have a theory of violence? What does modern political thought, in privileging humanity and rights, share with "terrorists" and "rogue states?" How is liberalism transformed by the use of religion and death for political ends? We read key thinkers of modern life- Adorno, Arendt, Agamben, Benjamin, Derrida, Fanon, Foucault, Gandhi, Heidegger, and Schmitt- to interrogate the relationship between religion, sacrifice, and democracy. At the center are connections between war and modern life, and between violence and non-violence.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kumar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 209S: Research Seminar for Majors

Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses. Autumn quarter focuses on gender, race, sexuality and History of Science; Winter quarter on early modern travel and Europe before 1500; Spring quarter on American political history and open topic.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 224A: The Soviet Civilization (HISTORY 424A, REES 224A)

Socialist visions and practices of the organization of society and messianic politics; the Soviet understanding of mass violence, political and ethnic; and living space. Primary and secondary sources. Research paper or historiographical essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hildermeier, M. (PI)

HISTORY 224C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

HISTORY 226E: Famine in the Modern World (HISTORY 326E, PEDS 226)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the major famines of modern history, the controversies surrounding them, and the reasons that famine persists in our increasingly globalized world. Focus is on the relative importance of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine in the modern world. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s; the Bengal famine of 1943-44; the Soviet famines of 1921-22 and 1932-33; China's Great Famine of 1959-61; the Ethiopian famines of the 1970s and 80s, and the Somalia famines of the 1990s and of 2011.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

HISTORY 227D: All Quiet on the Eastern Front? East Europe and Russia in the First World War (HISTORY 327D, REES 227, REES 327)

Until recently history has been comparatively quiet about the experience of World War I in the east. Far from being a peripheral theater of war, however, the experiences of war on the Eastern Front were central to shaping the 20th century. Not only was the first shot of the war fired in the east, it was also the site of the most dramatic political revolution. Using scholarly texts, literature and film, this course combines political, military, cultural and social approaches to introduce the causes, conduct and consequences of World War I with a focus on the experiences of soldiers and civilians on the Eastern Front. Topics include: the war of movement, occupation, extreme violence against civilians, the Armenian genocide, population exchanges, the Russian Revolution and civil war, and the disintegration of empires and rise of nation-states.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Knezevic, J. (PI)

HISTORY 229A: Nationhood and Belonging: Poles and Jews (HISTORY 329A, JEWISHST 289A, JEWISHST 389A)

Examines changing conceptions of nationhood in Poland, late-19th century to present, with focus on place of Jews in Polish society. What conditions fostered the early political sense of the nation? Why was it replaced with integral nationalism, and for some, fascism? How did Jews relate to their homeland? Emphasis on post-1918 history: impact of independence, Great Depression, West European fascism, World War II, imposition of communist rule, and collapse of the Soviet Bloc. Considers current Polish-Jewish relations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 230C: Paris: Capital of the Modern World (FRENCH 140, FRENCH 340, URBANST 184)

This course explores how Paris, between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries, became the political, cultural, and artistic capital of the modern world. It considers how the city has both shaped and been shaped by the tumultuous events of modern history- class conflict, industrialization, imperialism, war, and occupation. It will also explore why Paris became the major world destination for intellectuals, artists and writers. Sources will include films, paintings, architecture, novels, travel journals, and memoirs.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Daughton, J. (PI)

HISTORY 232C: European Security Since World War Two (HISTORY 332C, IPS 235, POLISCI 116A)

This course looks at European security during the Cold War and up to the present. There are many historical controversies to be examined, e.g. the enlargement of NATO, as well as theoretical and doctrinal debates, e.g. about extended deterrence and detente.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Holloway, D. (PI)

HISTORY 238D: Germany and the World Wars, 1870-1990 (HISTORY 338D, JEWISHST 288D, JEWISHST 388D)

(Students who have taken History 38A/138A should not enroll in this course.) This course examines Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. During this time, Germany ushered in five regimes and two world wars, seesawing between material ruin and economic prosperity on the frontline of Europe's military and ideological rifts. Beginning with Bismarck's wars of unification, the class spans World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sheffer, E. (PI)

HISTORY 240: The History of Evolution (BIO 340, HISTORY 340)

This course examines the history of evolutionary biology from its emergence around the middle of the eighteenth century. We will consider the continual engagement of evolutionary theories of life with a larger, transforming context: philosophical, political, social, economic, institutional, aesthetic, artistic, literary. Our goal will be to achieve a historical rich and nuanced understanding of how evolutionary thinking about life has developed to its current form.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 240G: Science and Empire, 1500-1900 (HISTORY 340G)

During the scientific revolution of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, European states carved out vast colonial empires in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. How did empires make science and how did science make empires? In this course, we will explore the history of the global exchange of people, objects, and knowledge. We will consider how early modern science, medicine, and technology helped create global empires, while emerging across the division of the world into "the West and the rest."
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Statman, A. (PI)

HISTORY 241D: Einstein and the Structure of Reality (HISTORY 341D)

Albert Einstein once remarked "One cannot help but be in awe when one contemplates the mysteries of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries to contemplate only a little of this mystery each day." In this course we will contemplate the history, science, and philosophy involved in three pathbreaking and contentious episodes in Einstein's lifelong quest to unveil the structure of reality: the special theory of relativity, the general theory of relativity, and the quantum theory.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lagerstrom, L. (PI)

HISTORY 242D: Knowledge and Information Infrastructures (STS 166)

This course introduces historical, theoretical, and comparative perspectives on knowledge and information systems from the medieval world to the present. Cases include libraries, meteorology, climate science, the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social science data systems. It theorizes how infrastructures form, how they change, and how they shape (and are shaped by) social systems. The course ends with challenges to modern knowledge infrastructures, such as crowdsourcing, citizen science, and alternative and bogus knowledge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Edwards, P. (PI)

HISTORY 247C: Revolutionary Mothers, National Fathers: Household, Politics and Nation in 20th Century Africa

A luta continua! This cry, Latin for "the struggle continues," evokes sub-Saharan African liberation struggles. Yet histories of these struggles sometimes cast them narrowly: as quests to transform European colonies into African-governed sovereign nation-states; struggles led by men; or public struggles, conducted in government buildings or on the streets. This course examines how freedom fighting intersected with other processes: changing gender norms, ethnic or religious identification, and labor or housing conditions, paying attention to ways political struggles came into homes.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Quinn, S. (PI)

HISTORY 256G: Constructing Race and Religion in America (AFRICAAM 236, AMSTUD 246, CSRE 246, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 246, RELIGST 346)

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 257: Was the American Revolution a Social Revolution? (HISTORY 357)

What kind of a revolution was the American Revolution? The revolution gave colonial Americans political independence from Britain to found the United States. But did the revolution also transform American society in its wake? This course explores how historians and historical participants alike have answered this question paying attention to historical changes (or lack thereof) that took place in American society between c. 1750-1820 as well as grappling with what conceptually constitutes a "social" revolution in the first place.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 260: California's Minority-Majority Cities (CSRE 260, URBANST 169)

Historical development and the social, cultural, and political issues that characterize large cities and suburbs where communities of color make up majority populations. Case studies include cities in Los Angeles, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties. Comparisons to minority-majority cities elsewhere in the U.S. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McKibben, C. (PI)

HISTORY 261G: Presidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History (INTNLREL 173)

Nothing better illustrates the evolution of the modern presidency than the arena of foreign policy. This class will examine the changing role and choices of successive presidential administrations over the past century, examining such factors as geopolitics, domestic politics, the bureaucracy, ideology, psychology, and culture. Students will be encouraged to think historically about the institution of the presidency, while examining specific case studies, from the First World War to the conflicts of the 21st century.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 265G: African-American Independent Film- On Both Sides of the Camera (AFRICAAM 265G, HISTORY 365G)

From D. W. Griffith's controversial "Birth of A Nation" (1915) to Nate Parker's also controversial "Birth of a Nation" (2016), Black Americans have played roles in Hollywood movies while also seeking to define how they are depicted in these movies. This course will introduce students to this history by featuring works of pioneering black filmmakers who challenged Hollywood racial stereotypes and created alternative images of the African-American experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 268C: Poverty in America (AMSTUD 268C, CSRE 268C, HISTORY 368C)

During the twentieth century, Americans launched numerous bold efforts to reduce poverty in the United States. Federal welfare policy, community-based programs, academic research, philanthropic charity, and grassroots activism committed time and resources to the cause, but poverty-- and inequality-- have persisted. Why? This seminar considers the origins, implementation, and consequences of these remedies, noting in particular how race, gender, citizenship, family composition, and geography have shaped the lives of those in poverty and the public and private responses to it.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dunning, C. (PI)

HISTORY 272D: Teaching Mexican American History in High School (CHILATST 272A, CSRE 272A)

The purpose of the course is two fold: 1) to expose students to salient historical themes and topics in Mexican American history, and 2) to establish a mentoring project with students currently enrolled in Mexican American history courses at Luis Valdez Leadership Academy (LVLA) high school in San Jose. Students will gain a broad understanding of Mexican American history, especially since the early twentieth century, with a particular focus on the Chicano Movement of the 1960s and 1970s. Students must also commit to enrollment in Hist 272F in spring quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Camarillo, A. (PI)

HISTORY 276K: The Nature State: Latin American Conservation in Global Perspective (HISTORY 376K)

This colloquium studies the history of conservation as a way to understand (territorial) state formation. It examines Latin America from a global perspective by comparing case studies from around the world. It examines how various political arrangements allowed for nature protection, the creation and functioning of institutions and bureaucracies in charge of protected areas, what these developments tell us about citizenship, the role of science in state formation, and the implications of different environments in the building of national territories.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Leal Leon, C. (PI)

HISTORY 283: Middle East Oil and Global Economy (HISTORY 383)

The class studies Middle East oil in the global economy using the method of political economy. Topics addressed include: origins of the Middle East oil industry; the Seven Sisters international oil cartel; Aramco and the U.S.-Saudi alliance; the post-World War II petroleum order; petroleum, the crisis of 1971-82, and the rise of a new regime of capital accumulation regulated neo-liberal economic orthodoxy and "Washington Consensus" policies- commonly referred to as "globalization" since the 1990s.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beinin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 291J: East Asian Environmental History (HISTORY 391J)

Traversing 2,500 years of history, this colloquium begins with conceptions of nature, agricultural time, and agriculture in ancient East Asia, proceeds to look closely at the environmental history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, and then concludes with environmental issues in East Asia from a contemporary perspective.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brown, T. (PI)

HISTORY 291K: Korean History and Culture before 1900 (HISTORY 391K, KOREA 158, KOREA 258)

This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional histories, diplomatic and political documents, along with religious texts and works of art. Scholarly work will help contextualize these materials, while the class discussions will introduce students to existing scholarly debates about the Korean past. Students will be asked also to examine the premodern past with an eye to contemporary reception. The final project for the class is a film study, where a modern Korean film portraying premodern Korea will be analyzed as a case study of how the past works in public historical memory in contemporary Korea, both North and South. An open-ended research paper is also possible, pending instructor approval.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wang, S. (PI)

HISTORY 292D: Japan in Asia, Asia in Japan (HISTORY 392D)

How Japan and Asia mutually shaped each other in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Focus is on Japanese imperialism in Asia and its postwar legacies. Topics include: pan-Asianism and orientalism; colonial modernization in Korea and Taiwan; collaboration and resistance; popular imperialism in Manchuria; total war and empire; comfort women and the politics of apology; the issue of resident Koreans; and economic and cultural integration of postwar Asia.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 293A: Research Seminar on Political Thought (HISTORY 493)

A series of texts and documents that form the heart of what Marx and Engels called "the colonial question". Discussions center on specific themes relating to each student's research topic and/or interests. The seminar will be organized around a set of core common readings and weekly discussions, supplemented by a designed list of secondary texts and primary materials. Themes include: secularism, religion, state, capital, empire, anticolonialism, gender, democracy, textual and print cultures, cinema, political and legal theory, and history of economic thought. 400-level options allows students to do a two-quarter sequence, with the Spring devoted to writing up the research paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kumar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 295F: Race and Ethnicity in East Asia (ASNAMST 295F, CSRE 295F, HISTORY 395F)

Intensive exploration of major issues in the history of race and ethnicity in China, Japan, and Korea from the early modern period to the present day.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 296C: The Making of Modern India (HISTORY 396C)

What does the history of the modern world look like as seen through India's history? Through an examination of ancient India and the development of Hindu and Buddhist communities, to the influx of Muslims and the rise of the Mughal Empire, to European colonialism, Gandhi and anti-colonial movements, to Partition, Independence, Bollywood, and the rise of Hindu nationalist political parties, this course will provide a fresh lens to not only view India's history, but India's role in shaping the modern world.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Perkins, C. (PI)

HISTORY 299H: Junior Honors Colloquium

Required of junior History majors planning to write a History honors thesis during senior year. Meets four times during the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 299M: Undergraduate Directed Research: Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 301K: A History of the Global Left: Revolutionary Movements against Empire (HISTORY 201K)

This class will trace the formation of trans-regional movements against imperialism in the modern period that helped create a "global Left." We will read contemporary works by thinkers such as Lord Byron, Karl Marx, Mohandas K. Gandhi, Annie Besant, and Faiz Ahmad Faiz, as well as historical studies of these figures and the movements in which they figured. Key topics include the American Revolution, the Indian "Mutiny" of 1857, the Ghadar movement, Pan-Islamism, Irish nationalism, and global communism.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 305: Graduate Pedagogy Workshop

Required of first-year History Ph.D. students. Perspectives on pedagogy for historians: course design, lecturing, leading discussion, evaluation of student learning, use of technology in teaching lectures and seminars. Addressing today's classroom: sexual harassment issues, integrating diversity, designing syllabi to include students with disabilities.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 306: Beyond Borders: Approaches to Transnational History

This core colloquium for the Transnational, International, and Global (TIG) field will introduce students to the major historiographical trends, methodological challenges, and theoretical approaches to studying and writing transnational histories.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 306B: Intoxicated: Commodities & Globalization in the Early Modern World (HISTORY 206B)

Early modern Europe experienced an influx of foreign goods, including coffee, sugar, chocolate, tea, and drugs, that ushered in a new era of global commerce. Yet, these developments also had consequences: the large-scale enslavement and relocation of human beings and the violent subjugation of local populations in the name of empire. A wider range of goods from far-flung places entered the grasp of a larger swath of society, but from where, by what means, and at what cost?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dorner, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 306D: World History: Graduate Colloquium

How do historians engage the global scale in the classroom as well as in research? The world history canon including Toynbee, McNeill, Braudel, Wolf, and Wallerstein; contrasting approaches, recent research, and resources for teaching. Recommended: concurrent enrollment in HISTORY 306K.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI); Wigen, K. (PI)

HISTORY 306K: World History Pedagogy Workshop

Students draft a syllabus and create a curriculum module for use in a world history lecture course. Corequisite: HISTORY 306D, recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI); Wigen, K. (PI)

HISTORY 308A: Science and Law in History (HISTORY 208A)

How the intertwined modern fields of science and law, since the early modern period, together developed central notions of fact, evidence, experiment, demonstration, objectivity, and proof.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 308F: Law and Humanities Workshop: History, Literature, and Philosophy

(Formerly LAW 516, now LAW 3515.) The Law and Humanities Workshop: History, Literature, and Philosophy is designed as a forum in which faculty and students from the Law School and from various humanities departments can discuss some of the best work now being done in law and humanities. Every other week, an invited speaker will present his or her current research for discussion. In the week prior to a given speaker's presentation, the class will meet as a group to discuss secondary literature relevant to understanding and critiquing the speaker's research. Students will then read the speaker's paper in advance of the following week's workshop presentation. Enrollment will be limited to 30 students-- 20 from SLS who will be selected by lottery and 10 from H&S. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, and writing assignments.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 309C: Liberalism and Violence (HISTORY 209C)

Does LIberalism have a theory of violence? What does modern political thought, in privileging humanity and rights, share with "terrorists" and "rogue states?" How is liberalism transformed by the use of religion and death for political ends? We read key thinkers of modern life- Adorno, Arendt, Agamben, Benjamin, Derrida, Fanon, Foucault, Gandhi, Heidegger, and Schmitt- to interrogate the relationship between religion, sacrifice, and democracy. At the center are connections between war and modern life, and between violence and non-violence.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kumar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 313: Core Colloquium: Graduate Readings in Medieval History

This course serves as a graduate-level introduction to major themes, problems, methods, and historiographical traditions in medieval European history.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Griffiths, F. (PI)

HISTORY 324C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 224C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

HISTORY 326E: Famine in the Modern World (HISTORY 226E, PEDS 226)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the major famines of modern history, the controversies surrounding them, and the reasons that famine persists in our increasingly globalized world. Focus is on the relative importance of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine in the modern world. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s; the Bengal famine of 1943-44; the Soviet famines of 1921-22 and 1932-33; China's Great Famine of 1959-61; the Ethiopian famines of the 1970s and 80s, and the Somalia famines of the 1990s and of 2011.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

HISTORY 327D: All Quiet on the Eastern Front? East Europe and Russia in the First World War (HISTORY 227D, REES 227, REES 327)

Until recently history has been comparatively quiet about the experience of World War I in the east. Far from being a peripheral theater of war, however, the experiences of war on the Eastern Front were central to shaping the 20th century. Not only was the first shot of the war fired in the east, it was also the site of the most dramatic political revolution. Using scholarly texts, literature and film, this course combines political, military, cultural and social approaches to introduce the causes, conduct and consequences of World War I with a focus on the experiences of soldiers and civilians on the Eastern Front. Topics include: the war of movement, occupation, extreme violence against civilians, the Armenian genocide, population exchanges, the Russian Revolution and civil war, and the disintegration of empires and rise of nation-states.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Knezevic, J. (PI)

HISTORY 329A: Nationhood and Belonging: Poles and Jews (HISTORY 229A, JEWISHST 289A, JEWISHST 389A)

Examines changing conceptions of nationhood in Poland, late-19th century to present, with focus on place of Jews in Polish society. What conditions fostered the early political sense of the nation? Why was it replaced with integral nationalism, and for some, fascism? How did Jews relate to their homeland? Emphasis on post-1918 history: impact of independence, Great Depression, West European fascism, World War II, imposition of communist rule, and collapse of the Soviet Bloc. Considers current Polish-Jewish relations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 332C: European Security Since World War Two (HISTORY 232C, IPS 235, POLISCI 116A)

This course looks at European security during the Cold War and up to the present. There are many historical controversies to be examined, e.g. the enlargement of NATO, as well as theoretical and doctrinal debates, e.g. about extended deterrence and detente.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Holloway, D. (PI)

HISTORY 338D: Germany and the World Wars, 1870-1990 (HISTORY 238D, JEWISHST 288D, JEWISHST 388D)

(Students who have taken History 38A/138A should not enroll in this course.) This course examines Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. During this time, Germany ushered in five regimes and two world wars, seesawing between material ruin and economic prosperity on the frontline of Europe's military and ideological rifts. Beginning with Bismarck's wars of unification, the class spans World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sheffer, E. (PI)

HISTORY 340: The History of Evolution (BIO 340, HISTORY 240)

This course examines the history of evolutionary biology from its emergence around the middle of the eighteenth century. We will consider the continual engagement of evolutionary theories of life with a larger, transforming context: philosophical, political, social, economic, institutional, aesthetic, artistic, literary. Our goal will be to achieve a historical rich and nuanced understanding of how evolutionary thinking about life has developed to its current form.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 340G: Science and Empire, 1500-1900 (HISTORY 240G)

During the scientific revolution of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, European states carved out vast colonial empires in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. How did empires make science and how did science make empires? In this course, we will explore the history of the global exchange of people, objects, and knowledge. We will consider how early modern science, medicine, and technology helped create global empires, while emerging across the division of the world into "the West and the rest."
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Statman, A. (PI)

HISTORY 341D: Einstein and the Structure of Reality (HISTORY 241D)

Albert Einstein once remarked "One cannot help but be in awe when one contemplates the mysteries of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries to contemplate only a little of this mystery each day." In this course we will contemplate the history, science, and philosophy involved in three pathbreaking and contentious episodes in Einstein's lifelong quest to unveil the structure of reality: the special theory of relativity, the general theory of relativity, and the quantum theory.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lagerstrom, L. (PI)

HISTORY 349: Bodies, Technologies, and Natures in Africa (AFRICAST 249, ANTHRO 348B)

This interdisciplinary course explores how modern African histories, bodies, and natures have been entangled with technological activities. Viewing Africans as experts and innovators, we consider how technologies have mediated, represented, or performed power in African societies. Topics include infrastructure, extraction, medicine, weapons, communications, sanitation, and more. Themes woven through the course include citizenship, mobility, labor, bricolage, in/formal economies, and technopolitical geographies, among others. Readings draw from history, anthropology, geography, and social/cultural theory.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hecht, G. (PI)

HISTORY 351C: Core in American History, Part III

Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Campbell, J. (PI)

HISTORY 352B: History of American Law (HISTORY 152)

(Formerly Law 318. Now Law 3504.) This course examines the growth and development of American legal institutions with particular attention to crime and punishment, slavery and race relations, the role of law in developing the economy, and the place of lawyers in American society, from colonial times to the present. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Final exam or paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Cross-listed with History (HISTORY 152 Consent of instructor required) & (HISTORY 352B).
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Friedman, L. (PI)

HISTORY 356G: Constructing Race and Religion in America (AFRICAAM 236, AMSTUD 246, CSRE 246, HISTORY 256G, RELIGST 246, RELIGST 346)

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 357: Was the American Revolution a Social Revolution? (HISTORY 257)

What kind of a revolution was the American Revolution? The revolution gave colonial Americans political independence from Britain to found the United States. But did the revolution also transform American society in its wake? This course explores how historians and historical participants alike have answered this question paying attention to historical changes (or lack thereof) that took place in American society between c. 1750-1820 as well as grappling with what conceptually constitutes a "social" revolution in the first place.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 365G: African-American Independent Film- On Both Sides of the Camera (AFRICAAM 265G, HISTORY 265G)

From D. W. Griffith's controversial "Birth of A Nation" (1915) to Nate Parker's also controversial "Birth of a Nation" (2016), Black Americans have played roles in Hollywood movies while also seeking to define how they are depicted in these movies. This course will introduce students to this history by featuring works of pioneering black filmmakers who challenged Hollywood racial stereotypes and created alternative images of the African-American experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 368C: Poverty in America (AMSTUD 268C, CSRE 268C, HISTORY 268C)

During the twentieth century, Americans launched numerous bold efforts to reduce poverty in the United States. Federal welfare policy, community-based programs, academic research, philanthropic charity, and grassroots activism committed time and resources to the cause, but poverty-- and inequality-- have persisted. Why? This seminar considers the origins, implementation, and consequences of these remedies, noting in particular how race, gender, citizenship, family composition, and geography have shaped the lives of those in poverty and the public and private responses to it.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dunning, C. (PI)

HISTORY 371: Graduate Colloquium: Explorations in Latin American History and Historiography (ILAC 371)

Introduction to modern Latin American history and historiography, including how to read and use primary sources for independent research.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Frank, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 376K: The Nature State: Latin American Conservation in Global Perspective (HISTORY 276K)

This colloquium studies the history of conservation as a way to understand (territorial) state formation. It examines Latin America from a global perspective by comparing case studies from around the world. It examines how various political arrangements allowed for nature protection, the creation and functioning of institutions and bureaucracies in charge of protected areas, what these developments tell us about citizenship, the role of science in state formation, and the implications of different environments in the building of national territories.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Leal Leon, C. (PI)

HISTORY 383: Middle East Oil and Global Economy (HISTORY 283)

The class studies Middle East oil in the global economy using the method of political economy. Topics addressed include: origins of the Middle East oil industry; the Seven Sisters international oil cartel; Aramco and the U.S.-Saudi alliance; the post-World War II petroleum order; petroleum, the crisis of 1971-82, and the rise of a new regime of capital accumulation regulated neo-liberal economic orthodoxy and "Washington Consensus" policies- commonly referred to as "globalization" since the 1990s.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beinin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 385A: Core Colloquium in Jewish History, 17th-19th Centuries (JEWISHST 385A)

Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rodrigue, A. (PI)

HISTORY 385B: Graduate Colloquium in Modern Jewish History (JEWISHST 385B)

Instructor consent required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zipperstein, S. (PI)

HISTORY 385C: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Vulnerability and Visibility (CSRE 185B, HISTORY 185B, JEWISHST 185B, REES 185B)

(Same as HISTORY 85B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 391J: East Asian Environmental History (HISTORY 291J)

Traversing 2,500 years of history, this colloquium begins with conceptions of nature, agricultural time, and agriculture in ancient East Asia, proceeds to look closely at the environmental history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, and then concludes with environmental issues in East Asia from a contemporary perspective.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brown, T. (PI)

HISTORY 391K: Korean History and Culture before 1900 (HISTORY 291K, KOREA 158, KOREA 258)

This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional histories, diplomatic and political documents, along with religious texts and works of art. Scholarly work will help contextualize these materials, while the class discussions will introduce students to existing scholarly debates about the Korean past. Students will be asked also to examine the premodern past with an eye to contemporary reception. The final project for the class is a film study, where a modern Korean film portraying premodern Korea will be analyzed as a case study of how the past works in public historical memory in contemporary Korea, both North and South. An open-ended research paper is also possible, pending instructor approval.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wang, S. (PI)

HISTORY 392D: Japan in Asia, Asia in Japan (HISTORY 292D)

How Japan and Asia mutually shaped each other in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Focus is on Japanese imperialism in Asia and its postwar legacies. Topics include: pan-Asianism and orientalism; colonial modernization in Korea and Taiwan; collaboration and resistance; popular imperialism in Manchuria; total war and empire; comfort women and the politics of apology; the issue of resident Koreans; and economic and cultural integration of postwar Asia.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 395F: Race and Ethnicity in East Asia (ASNAMST 295F, CSRE 295F, HISTORY 295F)

Intensive exploration of major issues in the history of race and ethnicity in China, Japan, and Korea from the early modern period to the present day.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 396C: The Making of Modern India (HISTORY 296C)

What does the history of the modern world look like as seen through India's history? Through an examination of ancient India and the development of Hindu and Buddhist communities, to the influx of Muslims and the rise of the Mughal Empire, to European colonialism, Gandhi and anti-colonial movements, to Partition, Independence, Bollywood, and the rise of Hindu nationalist political parties, this course will provide a fresh lens to not only view India's history, but India's role in shaping the modern world.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Perkins, C. (PI)

HISTORY 399P: Archives-Based Teaching Practicum

Through hands-on exercises and key readings, students will learn about basic archival handling techniques, usage guidelines, security issues, principles of archival organization, and bibliographic literacy around archival and Special Collections materials, along with an insiders tour of Stanford University Special Collections. During the second, students will partake in a hands-on session using Special Collections materials, with a class session enactment that demonstrates the program¿s concepts. Note: Enrollment only open to PhD students (ANY department) with instructor permission required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 424A: The Soviet Civilization (HISTORY 224A, REES 224A)

Socialist visions and practices of the organization of society and messianic politics; the Soviet understanding of mass violence, political and ethnic; and living space. Primary and secondary sources. Research paper or historiographical essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hildermeier, M. (PI)

HISTORY 430: Graduate Research Seminar: Early Modern Europe

Prerequisite: HISTORY 332G. Students may research any aspect of late medieval, Renaissance, and early modern history, ca. 1300-1800. Students wishing to take this seminar must enroll in HISTORY 332G: Early Modern Cities in Autumn 2017
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 433A: Research Seminar in Modern Europe

Students will complete an article-length research paper based on primary sources.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 461A: Graduate Research Seminar on the History of Women, Gender, the Family, and Sexuality (FEMGEN 461A)

Instructor consent required for non-History graduate students. Seminar introduces graduate students to current issues and methods in the history of women, gender, the family, and sexuality in the United States. After an initial period of working on secondary and primary source bibliographies, and some discussion of secondary readings, each student will choose a topic for an original research paper (20-30 pages) based on primary sources. Each student will complete a first draft of the paper by late May and a revised paper by the end of Spring Quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 481: Research Seminar in Middle East History (JEWISHST 287S, JEWISHST 481)

Student-selected research topics. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Yaycioglu, A. (PI)

HISTORY 493: Research Seminar on Political Thought (HISTORY 293A)

A series of texts and documents that form the heart of what Marx and Engels called "the colonial question". Discussions center on specific themes relating to each student's research topic and/or interests. The seminar will be organized around a set of core common readings and weekly discussions, supplemented by a designed list of secondary texts and primary materials. Themes include: secularism, religion, state, capital, empire, anticolonialism, gender, democracy, textual and print cultures, cinema, political and legal theory, and history of economic thought. 400-level options allows students to do a two-quarter sequence, with the Spring devoted to writing up the research paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kumar, A. (PI)
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