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TAPS 12N: To Die For: Antigone and Political Dissent (CLASSICS 17N)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 6N.) Preference to freshmen. Tensions inherent in the democracy of ancient Athens; how the character of Antigone emerges in later drama, film, and political thought as a figure of resistance against illegitimate authority; and her relevance to contemporary struggles for women's and workers' rights and national liberation. Readings and screenings include versions of Antigone by Sophocles, Anouilh, Brecht, Fugard/Kani/Ntshona, Paulin, Glowacki, Gurney, and von Trotta.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rehm, R. (PI)

TAPS 21N: The Idea of Virtual Reality

What is virtual reality and where is it heading? Was there VR before digital technology? What is the value of the real in a virtual culture? How, where, and when do we draw the line between the virtual and the real, the live and the mediated today? Concentrating on three aspects of VR simulation, immersion, and interactivity this course will examine recent experiments alongside a long history of virtual performance, from Plato's Cave to contemporary CAVEs, from baroque theatre design to Oculus Rift.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 21S: StoryCraft: On Relationships (FEMGEN 21S)

This class prepares students to tell their stories in front of the audience for Beyond Sex Ed: Intimacy & Relationships in Spring 2018. Do we need love? And if so, what does it look like? In this class, students will learn about relationships from the inside-out: through an examination and telling of their lived experiences. We will explore various perspectives on intimacy and relationships that illuminate different aspects of our lives, and then dive into our own stories to discover the many facets of intimacy. Due to the personal nature of the topic, we will emphasize safety, trust, and confidentiality throughout. The class offers the structure and guidance to 1) mine your life for stories, 2) craft the structure and shape of your stories, and 3) perform with presence, authenticity, and connection.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Booth, B. (PI)

TAPS 22: Scene Work

For actors who complete substantial scene work with graduate directors in the graduate workshop.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 29: Theater Performance: Acting

Students cast in department productions receive credit for their participation as actors; 1-2 units for graduate directing workshop projects and 1-3 units for major productions (units determined by instructor). May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Paris, H. (PI)

TAPS 34: Stage Management Techniques

The production process, duties, and responsibilities of a stage manager. Skills needed to stage manage a production.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 39: Theater Crew

For students working backstage, on run crew, or in the theater shops on TAPS department productions. Night and weekend time required. Pre-approval from Jane Casamajor (janecasa@stanford.edu) is required for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 42: Costume Construction

Course will cover the basics of costume and garment construction. Includes hand and machine skills as well as basic patterning ideas that may be applied to more advanced projects. Lecture/Lab
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Strayer, C. (PI)

TAPS 101P: Theater and Performance Making (TAPS 371P)

A creative workshop offering a range of generative exercises and techniques in order to devise, compose and perform original works. Students will explore a variety of texts (plays, poems, short stories, paintings) and work with the body, object and site. nnStudents will be encouraged to think critically about various compositional themes and ideas including: the relationship between form and content, aesthetics, space, proximity, and audience. Students will work independently and collaboratively creating original performances.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 103: Beginning Improvising

The improvisational theater techniques that teach spontaneity, cooperation, team building, and rapid problem solving, emphasizing common sense, attention to reality, and helping your partner. Based on TheatreSports by Keith Johnstone. Readings, papers, and attendance at performances of improvisational theater. Limited enrollment. Improv, Improvisation, creativity and creative expression. All who sign up are placed on a waitlist. Official enrollment will be determined after the first day of class. Attendance at the first class session is mandatory to be considered for enrollment in the course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 120A: Acting I: Fundamentals of Acting

A substantive introduction to the basics of the craft of acting, this course gives all incoming students the foundation of a common vocabulary. Students will learn fundamental elements of dramatic analysis, and how to apply it in action. Topics include scene analysis, environment work, psychological and physical scoring, and development of a sound and serviceable rehearsal technique. Scene work will be chosen from accessible, contemporary, and realistic plays. Outside rehearsal time required.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Amarotico, K. (PI)

TAPS 121V: Voice for the Actor

This course will focus on releasing a voice that effectively reaches the listener and is responsive to the actor¿s thoughts and feelings. Through work on breath awareness, alignment, resonance, and muscularity, students will learn to identify habits that help or hinder performance. Students will practice exercises to develop vocal strength, clarity, ease, and expressiveness while exploring the vocal demands of various texts and performing environments. Course will culminate in a presentation of classical and contemporary monologues. This course is a good preparation for auditions, rehearsal, and performance, and is appropriate for all levels. Priority space reserved for TAPS majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 122P: Undergrad Performance Project: Life is a Dream

The Undergraduate Performance Project provides students the opportunity to study and perform in major dramatic works. The Winter 2018 Undergraduate Performance Project presents Life is a Dream. Students learn to form an artistic ensemble, develop dramaturgical materials, learn professional arts protocols and practice, devise within the ensemble, and develop live performance ability. Audition required. Preference to majors/minors. Maybe repeated for credit. 3 maximum completions allowed. If repeated, 15 total units allowed.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-9 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 124D: Acting for Non-Majors

Formerly TAPS 20. Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 126: Sound Stories

This special seminar is designed for students interested in creating stories for radio, podcast, and other sound media. Students will learn both the core principles of telling strong stories, whatever the medium, and the strategies of telling entertaining, persuasive stories for the ear. Just like film or the novel, sonic stories offer a fascinating mix of constraints and opportunities, and you¿ll learn how to invite listeners into an experience or insight that combines theories, facts and feelings into a single space of empathy. This is a hybrid class¿equal parts classic seminar and creative workshop¿and students will create stories from start to finish and learn skills from pitching and interviewing to writing, editing, and digital production. Students will work in small groups to document places through the stories that inhabit them¿from the Menlo Park Police department to local shelters and community centers. Recommended for students interested in creative nonfiction, documentary, film, and even sound art. No prior experience necessary. Students wishing to enroll in this course must complete the following survey: nhttp://web.stanford.edu/~jwarga/S17TAPS126.fb (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 127: Movement for the Actor

This course is an exploration of movement techniques for the actor, designed to provide a foundation for performance practice. Students will develop a more grounded sense of ease and breath onstage, learn fundamentals of physical partnership, and acquire an expanded physical vocabulary. Areas of study include Laban movement analysis, observation and embodiment, basic contact improvisation, and physical characterization. Students will also engage a personalized warmup process for rehearsal and performance. All coursework will be entirely experiential, practical, and participatory. No previous experience necessary. Some outside rehearsal/investigation time required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chapman, M. (PI)

TAPS 131: Lighting Design

With the tools newly acquired from the previous quarter, this hands-on course features laboratory projects in lighting and designing live stage productions. Prerequisite TAPS 31.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shayne, T. (PI)

TAPS 133D: Set Design Practicum

This course is intended for students who are in the process of designing scenery for a Stanford club or department production and seek guidance in developing and refining their design. It is also open to students who have not yet committed to a fully realized set design project but would like to in the future, or anyone who would like to focus on the practical aspects of set design in general. Each week students present their work on a current or future set design and receive feedback and suggestions from classmates and the instructor. Also, the instructor will create project oriented assignments adapted to the needs and timeline of each individual project and student. Topics include: visual research, sketching, computer and hand drafting, and model making. During the first two weeks of the course students and instructor will determine a final project, such as a color model or design drafting, which will be required for completion of the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Flatmo, E. (PI)

TAPS 134: Stage Management Project

For students stage managing a production in the Department of Theater and Performance Studies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 135M: Introduction to Media Production

Students will explore ways to incorporate video and other multimedia tools in their theatrical work. We will analyze the use of prerecorded sound, video and slides in theater productions, both as scripted and as staged -- from Beckett's Krapp's Last Tape to The Wooster Group's Hamlet to Young Jean Lee's Untitled Feminist Show. Hands-on practical instruction will cover the fundamentals of cinematography, sound recording, picture and sound editing, directing for camera, and producing (planning, budgets, scheduling, permits, fair use, rights and clearances). Students will work in teams to create multimedia projects that can be used in a theatrical production.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 140: Introduction to Projects in Theatrical Production

A seminar course for students performing significant production work on Theater and Performance Studies Department or other Stanford University student theater projects. Students serving as producers, directors, designers or stage managers, who wish mentorship and credit for their production work sign up for this course and contact the instructor, Laxmi Kumaran. nPrerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 156: Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson (AFRICAAM 156, CSRE 156T, TAPS 356)

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 156V: Vital Signs: Performance in the 21st Century (ARTSTUDI 256V, TAPS 256V)

The first decade and a half of the 21st century have been transformative for performance art. On the one hand, it brought an unprecedented cultural acceptance of this art form, which is now featured in most prestigious museums and art festivals; on the other, the most recent generation of performance artists is showing a great awareness of the historicity and complexity of this form. In this class, we will try to recognize and investigate these and other prominent features of performance art produced since the turn of the millennium. We will use as our primary case studies performances that will be featured in the series Vital Signs: Contemporary Performance Art Series, hosted by TAPS in 2017-2018. The primary objective of the series is to highlight and showcase underrepresented performance forms such as experimental performance art, durational art, and body art, among others, by artists from communities that remain invisible or underrepresented in mainstream performing arts. The series is curated by the Los Angeles-based artist Cassils, who has been listed by the Huffington Post as 'one of ten transgender artists who are changing the landscape of contemporary art' and has achieved international recognition for a rigorous engagement with the body as a form of social sculpture. Cassils's curatorial vision is to present established performance artists alongside emerging artists. Each quarter, a pair of artists will visit Stanford for two days (Thursday-Friday). On day one of their visit they will offer a workshop or a public performance, and on the second day they will engage in a public dialogue. The class will meet each quarter for three weeks: before, during, and after the artists' visit. This way, the students will have an opportunity to prepare for the visit, engage with the visiting artists, and reflect on their work. They will receive their grades upon completion of the class, in the spring of 2018.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 165: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, SOC 146)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Markus, H. (PI); Moya, P. (PI)

TAPS 167: Introduction to Greek Tragedy: Gods, Heroes, Fate, and Justice (CLASSICS 112)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 110.) Gods and heroes, fate and free choice, gender conflict, the justice or injustice of the universe: these are just some of the fundamental human issues that we will explore in about ten of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McCall, M. (PI)

TAPS 170B: Directing Workshop: The Actor-Director Dialogue (TAPS 372)

This course focuses on the actor-director dialogue. We will work with actors and directors developing approaches to collaboration that make the actor-director dialogue in theater.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rehm, R. (PI)

TAPS 176N: The Inside Story

The Inside Story is a workshop that focuses on the generation of autobiographical material by exploring the connections between biology and biography. Students will gather autobiological and autobiographical material, investigate stories of their bodies and explore `gut feelings¿. They will work on individual and group exercises looking at cellular and body memory from which they will create text, gesture, image, performance and installation. The exercises will include autobiographical writing prompts, body memory exercises, Yin Yoga, and body mapping.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Paris, H. (PI)

TAPS 177C: Creating a Musical (MUSIC 184D)

This practical, hands on class in the making of musicals explores all aspects of creating musical theater, including writing, composing, producing, directing, designing, and casting this most American of theater genres. The class will include direct engagement and discussion with the producers and artists of TheatreWorks Silicon Valley¿s production of The Bridges of Madison County, book by Marsha Norman and music by Jason Robert Brown, including off-campus field trip to rehearsal of the show. The class will explore the creation of several renowned musicals including Stephen Sondheim¿s Merrily We Roll Along, and will include live Skype interviews with Broadway composers Andrew Lippa (The Wild Party), Paul Gordon (Jane Eyre), and David Hein and Irene Sankoff (Come from Away, winner of the 2017 Drama Desk Award for Best Musical). The quarter will culminate in the creation, production, and performance of several mini-musicals created by members of the class. Instructor Robert Kelley is the Founding Artistic Director of TheatreWorks Silicon Valley, where he has directed 170 productions, including many world and regional premieres.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kelley, R. (PI)

TAPS 177W: Workshop with Young Jean Lee (TAPS 277W)

Instructor Young Jean Lee is a playwright and director who will have two plays premiering on Broadway in 2018-2019. In this workshop, students will help to collaboratively perform, direct, and rewrite the script of one of these plays, which is about the intersection of class and race. The class will involve acting for students who want to act, directing for students who want to direct, and writing for students who want to write. The current character breakdown is as follows: 2 black women, 1 Asian-American woman, 1 Colombian woman, 1 Mexican-American man, 2 black men, 2 white women, 2 white men.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 178C: Writing a Full-Length Play (TAPS 278C)

Instructor Young Jean Lee is a playwright and director who will have two plays premiering on Broadway in 2018-2019. This workshop will guide students through the process of writing a full-length play, and will focus on helping students to find their own voices. Students will be required to write every week and share their work with the class, completing a full-length first draft by the end of the term. This class will be geared towards generating new material, rather than on editing in response to critiques, which will be covered in a spring course, EDITING A FULL-LENGTH PLAY. Topics to be discussed: the relationship between naturalistic and experimental theater; writing about unfamiliar subjects; and writing what you are afraid to write. Students must contact the instructor at yjl@stanford.edu ASAP in order to obtain an application for the class, which will be due on December 1.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 183E: Singing for Musicals (MUSIC 183E)

This course provides training in vocal technique, stylistic musical phrasing, and acting for students interested in performing musical theater. Students will learn about the physical process of singing, including posture, breath support, and vocal exercises. They will incorporate vocal technique with the study of phrasing in different styles of Broadway repertoire, and apply both to the art of acting the song. Each student will work on solo selections and ensembles, and sing in most classes. Through understanding vocal technique, students will become more confident and joyful performers. The course will culminate in a final public workshop performance
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jennings, K. (PI)

TAPS 184C: Dramatic Vocal Arts: Songs and Scenes Onstage (MUSIC 184C)

Studies in stagecraft, acting and performance for singers, culminating in a public performance. Repertoire to be drawn from the art song, opera, American Songbook and musical theater genres. Audition or consent of instructor required. May be repeated for credit a total of 4 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Catsalis, M. (PI)

TAPS 190: Special Research

Individual project on the work of a playwright, period, or genre. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robinson, A. (PI)

TAPS 191: Independent Study

Individual supervision of off-campus internship. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 192: Nitery Board Practicum (TAPS 292)

Credit given for student board members of the Experimental Nitery Studio. Undergraduate students should enroll in TAPS 192. Ph.D. students should enroll in TAPS 292.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hill, L. (PI)

TAPS 200: Senior Project

All TAPS Majors must complete a Senior Project that represents significant work in any area of theater and/or performance. The project must be an original contribution and can consist of any of the following: devising a performance, choreographing a dance, stage managing a production, designing a large theater work, performing a major role, writing a play, directing a show, or researching and writing a senior essay. Work for this project normally begins in Spring Quarter of the junior year and must be completed by the end of the senior year. Students receive credit for senior projects through TAPS 200. A minimum of 4 units is required, but additional units are available for larger projects. Students pursuing senior projects must submit a two-page proposal to a faculty advisor of their choice, which must be approved by the Undergraduate Advisor and the department faculty no later than the end of Spring Quarter of the junior year.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 202: Honors Thesis

An advanced written project to fulfill the requirements for the Honors degree in TAPS. There are two ways to undertake an honors thesis. The first is to write a 40-50 page essay, which presents research on an important issue or subject of the student¿s choice. The second option is a 30-page essay that takes the student¿s capstone project as a case study and critically analyzes the creative work. Students are expected to work consistently throughout the year with their advisor, whom they identify at the time of application. Advisors can be selected from Academic Council faculty or artists-in-residence. Students should enroll in TAPS 202 each quarter during the senior year (1 unit in Autumn; 1 unit in Winter; 2 units in Spring).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 231: Advanced Stage Lighting Design

Individually structured class in lighting mechanics and design through experimentation, discussions, and written reports. Prerequisite: 131 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 232: Advanced Costume Design

Individually structured tutorial for costume designers. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 132 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 233: Advanced Scene Design

Individually structured workshop. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 133 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 234: Advanced Stage Management Project

For students stage managing a Department of Drama production. Prerequisite: 134.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-9 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 256V: Vital Signs: Performance in the 21st Century (ARTSTUDI 256V, TAPS 156V)

The first decade and a half of the 21st century have been transformative for performance art. On the one hand, it brought an unprecedented cultural acceptance of this art form, which is now featured in most prestigious museums and art festivals; on the other, the most recent generation of performance artists is showing a great awareness of the historicity and complexity of this form. In this class, we will try to recognize and investigate these and other prominent features of performance art produced since the turn of the millennium. We will use as our primary case studies performances that will be featured in the series Vital Signs: Contemporary Performance Art Series, hosted by TAPS in 2017-2018. The primary objective of the series is to highlight and showcase underrepresented performance forms such as experimental performance art, durational art, and body art, among others, by artists from communities that remain invisible or underrepresented in mainstream performing arts. The series is curated by the Los Angeles-based artist Cassils, who has been listed by the Huffington Post as 'one of ten transgender artists who are changing the landscape of contemporary art' and has achieved international recognition for a rigorous engagement with the body as a form of social sculpture. Cassils's curatorial vision is to present established performance artists alongside emerging artists. Each quarter, a pair of artists will visit Stanford for two days (Thursday-Friday). On day one of their visit they will offer a workshop or a public performance, and on the second day they will engage in a public dialogue. The class will meet each quarter for three weeks: before, during, and after the artists' visit. This way, the students will have an opportunity to prepare for the visit, engage with the visiting artists, and reflect on their work. They will receive their grades upon completion of the class, in the spring of 2018.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 258: Black Feminist Theater and Theory (AFRICAAM 258, CSRE 258, FEMGEN 258X)

From the rave reviews garnered by Angelina Weld Grimke's lynching play, Rachel to recent work by Lynn Nottage on Rwanda, black women playwrights have addressed key issues in modern culture and politics. We will analyze and perform work written by black women in the U.S., Britain and the Caribbean in the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics include: sexuality, surrealism, colonialism, freedom, violence, colorism, love, history, community and more. Playwrights include: Angelina Grimke, Lorriane Hansberry, Winsome Pinnock, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan- Lori Parks, Ntzoke Shange, Pearl Cleage, Sarah Jones, Anna DeVeare Smith, Alice Childress, Lydia Diamond and Zora Neale Hurston.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 277W: Workshop with Young Jean Lee (TAPS 177W)

Instructor Young Jean Lee is a playwright and director who will have two plays premiering on Broadway in 2018-2019. In this workshop, students will help to collaboratively perform, direct, and rewrite the script of one of these plays, which is about the intersection of class and race. The class will involve acting for students who want to act, directing for students who want to direct, and writing for students who want to write. The current character breakdown is as follows: 2 black women, 1 Asian-American woman, 1 Colombian woman, 1 Mexican-American man, 2 black men, 2 white women, 2 white men.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 278C: Writing a Full-Length Play (TAPS 178C)

Instructor Young Jean Lee is a playwright and director who will have two plays premiering on Broadway in 2018-2019. This workshop will guide students through the process of writing a full-length play, and will focus on helping students to find their own voices. Students will be required to write every week and share their work with the class, completing a full-length first draft by the end of the term. This class will be geared towards generating new material, rather than on editing in response to critiques, which will be covered in a spring course, EDITING A FULL-LENGTH PLAY. Topics to be discussed: the relationship between naturalistic and experimental theater; writing about unfamiliar subjects; and writing what you are afraid to write. Students must contact the instructor at yjl@stanford.edu ASAP in order to obtain an application for the class, which will be due on December 1.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 290: Special Research

Individual project on the work of a playwright, period, or genre.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 292: Nitery Board Practicum (TAPS 192)

Credit given for student board members of the Experimental Nitery Studio. Undergraduate students should enroll in TAPS 192. Ph.D. students should enroll in TAPS 292.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hill, L. (PI)

TAPS 313: Performance and Performativity (ENGLISH 313, FEMGEN 313)

Performance theory through topics including: affect/trauma, embodiment, empathy, theatricality/performativity, specularity/visibility, liveness/disappearance, belonging/abjection, and utopias and dystopias. Readings from Schechner, Phelan, Austin, Butler, Conquergood, Roach, Schneider, Silverman, Caruth, Fanon, Moten, Anzaldúa, Agamben, Freud, and Lacan. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Menon, J. (PI)

TAPS 321: Proseminar

Workshop. Open to graduate and undergraduate students. Prepares PhD students for the academic profession by honing skills in conference presentations, job market, and scholarly publications. Also offered to undergraduates to help prepare them for careers in theater.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Looser, D. (PI)

TAPS 336: Comprehensive 1st Year Exam

Required course for first-year Ph.D. students in Theater & Performance Studies. Credits for work toward the Comprehensive 1st-year Exam taken in late February or Early March.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 356: Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson (AFRICAAM 156, CSRE 156T, TAPS 156)

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 371P: Theater and Performance Making (TAPS 101P)

A creative workshop offering a range of generative exercises and techniques in order to devise, compose and perform original works. Students will explore a variety of texts (plays, poems, short stories, paintings) and work with the body, object and site. nnStudents will be encouraged to think critically about various compositional themes and ideas including: the relationship between form and content, aesthetics, space, proximity, and audience. Students will work independently and collaboratively creating original performances.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 372: Directing Workshop: The Actor-Director Dialogue (TAPS 170B)

This course focuses on the actor-director dialogue. We will work with actors and directors developing approaches to collaboration that make the actor-director dialogue in theater.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rehm, R. (PI)

TAPS 376: Projects in Performance

Creative projects to be determined in consultation with Drama graduate faculty and production advisor
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Paris, H. (PI)

TAPS 377: Graduate Directors' Staged Reading Project

Presentation of a new or newly adapted work for the stage, in a mode employed in professional theater for the development of new plays. Two to four rehearsals. Public performance.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 390: Directed Reading

Students may take directing reading only with the permission of their dissertation advisor. Might be repeatable for credit twice for 6 units total.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 802: TGR Dissertation

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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