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EMED 110: Basic Cardiac Life Support for Undergraduates

Preference to undergraduates. Teaches one- and two-rescuer adult CPR and management of an obstructed airway using the American CPR model. Does not satisfy MD student BCLS requirement; MD students take Surgery 201.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Thompson, A. (PI)

EMED 111A: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211A)

Emergency Medical Technicians are trained to provide basic life support and to transport sick and injured patients to the hospital. Topics include patient assessment and management of cardiac, respiratory, neurological and other medical emergencies. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. After completion of the EMED 111 sequence and meeting all class requirements, students can sit for the National Registry EMT cognitive exam and obtain state certification as an EMT. We encourage freshman and sophomores to apply. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission). Prerequisites: Application (see http://emt.stanford.edu) and consent of instructor. AHA or Red Cross healthcare provider CPR certification is also required, but can be obtained during fall quarter. A one time course fee of $60 will be assessed to cover required equipment and a uniform shirt.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 112A: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT **EMT REFRESHER** (EMED 212A)

EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course which provides the equivalent of 24 hours of continuing education for recertification. Topics include both medical and traumatic emergencies as well as skills training. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, the initial EMT training course. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first few weeks of class.nPrerequisites: Completion of an EMT certification course (such as EMED 111A-C), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 125: Social Emergency Medicine and Community Engagement

Stanford Health Advocates and Research in the Emergency Department (SHAR(ED)) is focused on the practical application of and research in social emergency medicine.Emergency Departments (EDs) are the nation's safety nets, for medical as well as social needs. EDs remain the sole access to any medical care for those in need, 24/7, regardless of insurance status. The ED is a unique bridge to the public, and is a compelling site for community partnership, clinical and health services research geared towards impacting population health and policy. Through direct patient contact and community engagement, students help to meet the social needs of ED patients. Pre-requisite to the course to be a SHAR(ED) volunteer.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, N. (PI)

EMED 199: Undergraduate Research

Consists of Emergency Medicine focused studies and projects (including Research Projects) in progress. Possible topics include management of trauma patients, common medical and surgical emergencies in pediatric and adult populations, topics in disaster medicine, biosecurity and bioterrorism response, wilderness medicine, international medicine, and others. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EMED 201: Basic Cardiac Life Support for Healthcare Professionals

All medical students must be certified in Basic Cardiac Life Support before the end of the first (autumn) quarter. Students who provide documentation of certification received within six months prior to the date of matriculation will be exempted from the requirement. The course teaches one- and two-rescuer CPR, management of an obstructed airway, and CPR for infants and children. Upon completion of the course, students receive an American Heart Association certificate in BLS.nIn addition to CPR training, we will also teach Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) which is the CPR equivalent to psychological emergencies. This portion of the course will allow students to master techniques on how to recognize and respond to an individual in psychological distress and to help in suicide prevention. Our faculty are certified QPR instructors and students will become QPR certified during this course through the QPR Institute certification process.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Smith-Coggins, R. (PI)

EMED 201A: Re-Certification for Basic Cardiac Life Support for Healthcare Professionals

The purpose of this course is to provide medical students re-certification in Basic Cardiac Life Support (BLS), in accordance with guidelines from the American Heart Association. Initial certification (EMED 201) occurs in the first year and expires 2 years from the initial course. This course will fulfill the requirements of the current BLS certification needed to complete the mandatory Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) training prior to graduation. Student will refresh their skills in one - and two-rescuer CPR for infants and adults, management of an obstructed airway, and use of an automated external defibrillator.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Smith-Coggins, R. (PI)

EMED 205: Film and Television Emergencies: Grasp Emergency Care through Pop Culture

Although popular shows such as Grey's Anatomy successfully enthrall an audience, they often exchange accuracy for entertainment value. This course aims to "set the record straight" and deconstruct these medical dramas into the technical and non-technical skills involved in handling medical emergencies. Working in small groups and guided by emergency medicine faculty, students will actively curate content for discussions about the appropriate usage of these skills. Topics range from CPR and stroke management to decisionmaking and the social influence of medial dramas.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Curtis, H. (PI)

EMED 210A: Managing Emergencies: What Every Doctor Should Know (Clinical Fundamentals)

Reviews basic but critical concepts in evaluating and managing patients with possible life-threatening emergencies with a special focus on avoiding common errors. Topics include cardiovascular collapse, basic airway management, triage and shock. Teaches skills such as reading an ECG or a chest x-ray to aid students in developing a rapid response to patients with potentially fatal complaints. Class meets online.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Walker, R. (PI)

EMED 210B: Managing Emergencies: What Every Doctor Should Know (High Risk Chief Complaints)

Students learn management of various emergent and traumatic patient presentations. Some topics include advanced airway, trauma, burns, poisoning, and stroke. Key skills and common pitfalls in practice discussed. Providers completing Surg 210A and B will be better prepared to respond effectively with a challenging and urgent case. Class meets online.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Walker, R. (PI)

EMED 211A: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 111A)

Emergency Medical Technicians are trained to provide basic life support and to transport sick and injured patients to the hospital. Topics include patient assessment and management of cardiac, respiratory, neurological and other medical emergencies. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. After completion of the EMED 111 sequence and meeting all class requirements, students can sit for the National Registry EMT cognitive exam and obtain state certification as an EMT. We encourage freshman and sophomores to apply. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission). Prerequisites: Application (see http://emt.stanford.edu) and consent of instructor. AHA or Red Cross healthcare provider CPR certification is also required, but can be obtained during fall quarter. A one time course fee of $60 will be assessed to cover required equipment and a uniform shirt.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 212A: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT **EMT REFRESHER** (EMED 112A)

EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course which provides the equivalent of 24 hours of continuing education for recertification. Topics include both medical and traumatic emergencies as well as skills training. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, the initial EMT training course. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first few weeks of class.nPrerequisites: Completion of an EMT certification course (such as EMED 111A-C), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 214: Yoga and Wellness for Bioscience and Medical Students

The class will consist of one hour of beginner friendly yoga practice followed by one hour of discussion over a light meal. Students will learn and practice yoga techniques and health practices for managing mental and emotional stressors. Students will learn to identify signs and symptoms of stress, how anxiety manifests int he body and mind, and yoga techniques for relief. This course will include yoga instruction, readings related to yoga and bioscience research/patient care outcomes, and student participation to enable students to: (1) acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle. MD and BioScience graduate students have priority for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

EMED 220: Emergency Medicine: Introduction

An introduction to the specialty of emergency medicine, including the emergency stabilization of patients in both the pre-hospital phase and in the emergency department. The course will include both lectures and hands on practical sessions. Topics consist of management of trauma patients and common medical emergencies, with hands on sessions including how to manage airway emergencies and suturing. 2 units includes two four-hour emergency department shadow shifts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 224: Wilderness First Aid

Provides basic introductory back country and emergency medicine skill development. Topics covered include patient assessment, addressing life threats, shock, spine safety, musculoskeletal injuries, medical emergencies, and environmental emergencies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 226: Wilderness First Responder

A more advanced and intensive class building on wilderness first aid that teaches first responder skills using improvised resources in varying environmental conditions and extended-care situations. This is used as a framework for learning to respond to medical emergencies in remote wilderness settings. Examines necessary tools to make critical medical and evacuation decisions.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Thompson, A. (PI)

EMED 255: Design for Health: Helping Patients Navigate the System (DESINST 255)

For many people, participating in the American healthcare system is confusing, frustrating and often disempowering. It is also an experience fueled with emotional intensity and feelings of vulnerability. The current ecosystem, with its complexity and multiple stakeholders, is rife with human-centered design opportunities. An especially sticky set of issues lies in the ways people navigate healthcare: understanding how the system works, accessing information about services, making decisions about treatment and interventions, and advocating for needs.nnAdmission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classesn for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EMED 280: Early Clinical Experience in Emergency Medicine

Provides an observational experience in an emergency medicine specialty. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Albanese, C. (PI); Auerbach, P. (PI); Barrett, B. (PI); Bonham, C. (PI); Bresler, M. (PI); Bruzoni, M. (PI); Busque, S. (PI); Chang, J. (PI); Chase, R. (PI); Concepcion, W. (PI); Curtin, C. (PI); D'Souza, P. (PI); Dalman, R. (PI); Dannenberg, B. (PI); Dirbas, F. (PI); Duriseti, R. (PI); Dutta, S. (PI); Eisenberg, D. (PI); Esquivel, C. (PI); Ferguson, I. (PI); Fuchs, J. (PI); Garmel, G. (PI); Gharahbaghian, L. (PI); Gilbert, G. (PI); Girod, S. (PI); Gosling, J. (PI); Govindarajan, P. (PI); Greco, R. (PI); Gregg, D. (PI); Gurtner, G. (PI); Harris, E. (PI); Harter, P. (PI); Hartman, G. (PI); Helms, J. (PI); Hentz, R. (PI); Hernandez-Boussard, T. (PI); Jeffrey, S. (PI); Kahn, D. (PI); Khosla, R. (PI); Klofas, E. (PI); Krams, S. (PI); Krummel, T. (PI); Lau, J. (PI); Lee, G. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Leeper, N. (PI); Lin, J. (PI); Lipman, G. (PI); Longaker, M. (PI); Lorenz, H. (PI); Maggio, P. (PI); Mahadevan, S. (PI); Martinez, O. (PI); Melcher, M. (PI); Mell, M. (PI); Morton, J. (PI); Mueller, C. (PI); Murphy, K. (PI); Norris, R. (PI); Norton, J. (PI); Oberhelman, H. (PI); Perera, P. (PI); Poultsides, G. (PI); Quinn, J. (PI); Raphael, E. (PI); Rhoads, K. (PI); Rivas, H. (PI); Ryan, J. (PI); Salvatierra, O. (PI); Schendel, S. (PI); Schreiber, D. (PI); Shelton, A. (PI); Shen, S. (PI); Smith-Coggins, R. (PI); So, S. (PI); Spain, D. (PI); Srivastava, S. (PI); Staudenmayer, K. (PI); Sternbach, G. (PI); Strehlow, M. (PI); Sylvester, K. (PI); Taleghani, N. (PI); Trounce, M. (PI); Visser, B. (PI); Wan, D. (PI); Wang, N. (PI); Wapnir, I. (PI); Weiss, E. (PI); Welton, M. (PI); Whitmore, I. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Wren, S. (PI); Yang, G. (PI); Yang, S. (PI); Zafren, K. (PI); Zarins, C. (PI); Zhou, W. (PI)

EMED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 398W: Clinical Elective in Emergency Medicine

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 399: Graduated Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Quinn, J. (PI); Yang, S. (PI)
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