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ENGR 10: Introduction to Engineering Analysis

Integrated approach to the fundamental scientific principles that are the cornerstones of engineering analysis: conservation of mass, atomic species, charge, momentum, angular momentum, energy, production of entropy expressed in the form of balance equations on carefully defined systems, and incorporating simple physical models. Emphasis is on setting up analysis problems arising in engineering. Topics: simple analytical solutions, numerical solutions of linear algebraic equations, and laboratory experiences. Provides the foundation and tools for subsequent engineering courses. Prerequisite: AP Physics and AP Calculus or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 14: Intro to Solid Mechanics

Introduction to engineering analysis using the principles of engineering solid mechanics. Builds on the math and physical reasoning concepts in Physics 41 to develop skills in evaluation of engineered systems across a variety of fields. Foundational ideas for more advanced solid mechanics courses such as ME80 or CEE101A. Interactive lecture sessions focused on mathematical application of key concepts, with weekly complementary lab session on testing and designing systems that embody these concepts. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval. Pre-requisite: Physics 41.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 15: Dynamics

The application of Newton's Laws to solve 2-D and 3-D static and dynamic problems, particle and rigid body dynamics, freebody diagrams, and equations of motion, with application to mechanical, biomechanical, and aerospace systems. Computer numerical solution and dynamic response. Prerequisites: Calculus (differentiation and integration) such as MATH 41; and ENGR 14 (statics and strength) or a mechanics course in physics such as PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 20: Introduction to Chemical Engineering (CHEMENG 20)

Overview of chemical engineering through discussion and engineering analysis of physical and chemical processes. Topics: overall staged separations, material and energy balances, concepts of rate processes, energy and mass transport, and kinetics of chemical reactions. Applications of these concepts to areas of current technological importance: biotechnology, energy, production of chemicals, materials processing, and purification. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 30: Engineering Thermodynamics

The basic principles of thermodynamics are introduced in this course. Concepts of energy and entropy from elementary considerations of the microscopic nature of matter are discussed. The principles are applied in thermodynamic analyses directed towards understanding the performances of engineering systems. Methods and problems cover socially responsible economic generation and utilization of energy in central power generation plants, solar systems, refrigeration devices, and automobile, jet and gas-turbine engines.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 40M: An Intro to Making: What is EE

Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 50: Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis

The structure, bonding, and atomic arrangements in materials leading to their properties and applications. Topics include electronic and mechanical behavior, emphasizing nanotechnology, solid state devices, and advanced structural and composite materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 62: Introduction to Optimization (MS&E 111)

Formulation and analysis of linear optimization problems. Solution using Excel solver. Polyhedral geometry and duality theory. Applications to contingent claims analysis, production scheduling, pattern recognition, two-player zero-sum games, and network flows. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 70A: Programming Methodology (CS 106A)

Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Uses the Java programming language. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 70B: Programming Abstractions (CS 106B)

Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 80: Introduction to Bioengineering (Engineering Living Matter) (BIOE 80)

Students completing BIOE.80 should have a working understanding for how to approach the systematic engineering of living systems to benefit all people and the planet. Our main goals are (1) to help students learn ways of thinking about engineering living matter and (2) to empower students to explore the broader ramifications of engineering life. Specific concepts and skills covered include but are not limited to: capacities of natural life on Earth; scope of the existing human-directed bioeconomy; deconstructing complicated problems; reaction & diffusion systems; microbial human anatomy; conceptualizing the engineering of biology; how atoms can be organized to make molecules; how to print DNA from scratch; programming genetic sensors, logic, & actuators; biology beyond molecules (photons, electrons, etc.); what constraints limit what life can do?; what will be the major health challenges in 2030?; how does what we want shape bioengineering?; who should choose and realize various competing bioengineering futures?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 100: Teaching Public Speaking

The theory and practice of teaching public speaking and presentation development. Lectures/discussions on developing an instructional plan, using audiovisual equipment for instruction, devising tutoring techniques, and teaching delivery, organization, audience analysis, visual aids, and unique speaking situations. Weekly practice speaking. Students serve as apprentice speech tutors. Those completing course may become paid speech instructors in the Technical Communications Program. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 102W: Writing for Engineers

Intensive practicum focusing on effective communication of technical, scientific, and professional information in industry and academia. Best writing practices for varied audiences, purposes, and media. Group workshops and individual conferences with instructors. Designed for undergraduates.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Harrison, K. (PI)

ENGR 103: Public Speaking (ENGR 203)

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 105: Feedback Control Design

Design of linear feedback control systems for command-following error, stability, and dynamic response specifications. Root-locus and frequency response design techniques. Examples from a variety of fields. Some use of computer aided design with MATLAB. Prerequisite: EE 102, ME 161, or equivalent.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 119: Community Engagement Preparation Seminar (ENGR 219)

This seminar is designed for engineering students who have already committed to an experiential learning program working directly with a community partner on a project of mutual benefit. This seminar is targeted at students participating in the Summer Service Learning Program offered through Stanford¿s Global Engineering Program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

ENGR 131: Ethical Issues in Engineering

Ethical responsibilities of engineers in relation to society, employers, colleagues, and clients; cost-benefit-risk analysis, safety, and informed consent; the ethics of whistleblowing; ethical issues that face engineers as expert witnesses, consultants, and managers; ethical issues in engineering research, design, testing, manufacturing, and operations; ethical issues arising from engineering work in foreign countries; and ethical issues arising from the social, cultural, and environmental contexts of contemporary engineering work. Historical and contemporary case studies. Limited enrollment. Students must attend and complete an application at the first class session.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 140A: Leadership of Technology Ventures

First of three-part sequence for students selected to the Mayfield Fellows Program. Management and leadership within high technology startups, focusing on entrepreneurial skills related to product and market strategy, venture financing and cash flow management, team recruiting and organizational development, and the challenges of managing growth and handling adversity in emerging ventures. Other engineering faculty, founders, and venture capitalists participate as appropriate. Recommended: accounting or finance course (MS&E 140, ECON 90, or ENGR 60).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 150: Data Challenge Lab

In this lab, students develop the practical skills of data science by solving a series of increasingly difficult, real problems. Skills developed include: data manipulation, data visualization, exploratory data analysis, and basic modeling. The data challenges each student undertakes are based upon their current skills. Students receive one-on-one coaching and see how expert practitioners solve the same challenges. Limited enrollment; application required. See http://datalab.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 154: Vector Calculus for Engineers (CME 100)

Computation and visualization using MATLAB. Differential vector calculus: analytic geometry in space, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, unconstrained maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers. Introduction to linear algebra: matrix operations, systems of algebraic equations, methods of solution and applications. Integral vector calculus: multiple integrals in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, line integrals, scalar potential, surface integrals, Green¿s, divergence, and Stokes¿ theorems. Examples and applications drawn from various engineering fields. Prerequisites: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 4 or 5, or Calc AB with 5), or Math 41 and 42.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 155A: Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (CME 102)

Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 4 or 5, or Calc AB with 5), or Math 41 and 42. Recommended: CME100.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 155B: Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers (CME 104)

Linear algebra: matrix operations, systems of algebraic equations, Gaussian elimination, undetermined and overdetermined systems, coupled systems of ordinary differential equations, eigensystem analysis, normal modes. Fourier series with applications, partial differential equations arising in science and engineering, analytical solutions of partial differential equations. Numerical methods for solution of partial differential equations: iterative techniques, stability and convergence, time advancement, implicit methods, von Neumann stability analysis. Examples and applications from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: CME 102/ENGR 155A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 159Q: Japanese Companies and Japanese Society (MATSCI 159Q)

Preference to sophomores. The structure of a Japanese company from the point of view of Japanese society. Visiting researchers from Japanese companies give presentations on their research enterprise. The Japanese research ethic. The home campus equivalent of a Kyoto SCTI course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sinclair, R. (PI)

ENGR 193: Discover Engineering: How to Aim High, Embrace Uncertainty, and Achieve Impact

This weekly seminar will provide students of all engineering majors with practical leadership skills training (e.g. how to network, advocate for yourself, assert influence) in order to make innovative and meaningful contributions in their fields. Career exploration and mentorship opportunities will be delivered through an inspiring line up of guest speakers and interactive activities, demonstrations and tours. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 199: Special Studies in Engineering

Special studies, lab work, or reading under the direction of a faculty member. Often research experience opportunities exist in ongoing research projects. Students make arrangements with individual faculty and enroll in the section number corresponding to the particular faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 199W: Writing of Original Research for Engineers

Technical writing in science and engineering. Students produce a substantial document describing their research, methods, and results. Prerequisite: completion of freshman writing requirements; prior or concurrent in 2 units of research in the major department; and consent of instructor. WIM for BioMedical Computation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 202S: Writing: Special Projects

Individualized writing instruction for students working on writing projects such as dissertations, proposals, grant applications, honors or engineering theses, journal articles, conference papers, and teaching and research statements. Weekly one-on-one conferences with writing instructors from the Technical Communication Program. Students receive close attention to and detailed feedback on their writing. No prerequisite. Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit. This course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; McDevitt, M. (PI)

ENGR 202W: Technical Writing

How to write clear, concise, and well-ordered technical prose. Principles of editing for structure and style. Applications to a variety of genres in engineering and science.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 203: Public Speaking (ENGR 103)

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 219: Community Engagement Preparation Seminar (ENGR 119)

This seminar is designed for engineering students who have already committed to an experiential learning program working directly with a community partner on a project of mutual benefit. This seminar is targeted at students participating in the Summer Service Learning Program offered through Stanford¿s Global Engineering Program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

ENGR 250: Data Challenge Lab

In this lab, students develop the practical skills of data science by solving a series of increasingly difficult, real problems. Skills developed include: data manipulation, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, and predictive modeling. The data challenges each student undertakes are based upon their current skills. Students receive one-on-one coaching and see how expert practitioners solve the same challenges. Prerequisite: ENGR150. Limited enrollment; application required. May be repeated for credit. See http://datalab.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-6 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 280: From Play to Innovation

Focus is on enhancing the innovation process with playfulness. The class will be project-based and team-centered. We will investigate the human "state of play" to reach an understanding of its principal attributes and how important it is to creative thinking. We will explore play behavior, its development, and its biological basis. We will then apply those principles through design thinking to promote innovation in the corporate world. Students will work with real-world partners on design projects with widespread application. This course requires an application. You can find the application here: dschool.stanford.edu/classes
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 290: Graduate Environment of Support

For course assistants (CAs) and tutors in the School of Engineering tutorial and learning program. Interactive training for effective academic assistance. Pedagogy, developing course material, tutoring, and advising. Sources include video, readings, projects, and role playing.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lozano, N. (PI)

ENGR 298: Seminar in Fluid Mechanics

Interdepartmental. Problems in all branches of fluid mechanics, with talks by visitors, faculty, and students. Graduate students may register for 1 unit, without letter grade; a letter grade is given for talks. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGR 299: Special Studies in Engineering

Special studies, lab work, or reading under the direction of a faculty member. Often research experience opportunities exist in ongoing research projects. Students make arrangements with individual faculty and enroll in the corresponding section. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 311B: Designing the Professional

Once I get my degree, how do I get a life? What do you want out of life after Stanford? Wondering how to weave together what fits, is doable, and will be truly meaningful? Join us for Designing the Professional. This course applies the innovation principles of design thinking to the "wicked problem" of designing your life and vocation in and beyond Stanford. We'll approach these lifelong questions with a structured framework set in a seminar where you can work out your ideas in conversation with your peers. Seminar open to all graduate students (PhD, Masters) and Postdocs in all 7 schools.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGR 313: Topics in Engineering and Science Education

This seminar series focuses on topics related to teaching science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses based on education research. Each year focuses on a different topic related to STEM education. This course may be repeated for credit each year. This year we will explore problem-based learning in STEM courses, particularly focusing on design and evaluation of problem-based learning activities. The course will involve in-class discussions, small group activities, and guest lectures. Throughout the quarter, there will be several opportunities for directly practicing and applying STEM education strategies to specific teaching goals in your field.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGR 350: Data Impact Lab

In this lab, multi-disciplinary teams of students tackle high-impact, unsolved problems for social sector partners. Teams receive mentorship and coaching from Stanford faculty, domain experts, and data science experts from industry. Sample projects include innovations for: poverty alleviation in the developing world, local government services, education, and healthcare. Limited enrollment; application required. May be repeated for credit. See http://datalab.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (EDUC 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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