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ARTHIST 1B: Introduction to the Visual Arts: History of Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present

This course surveys the history of Western painting from the start of the 14th century to the late 20th century and our own moment. Lectures introduce important artists (Giotto, Rembrandt, Velazquez, Goya, Manet, Matisse, Pollock, and others), and major themes associated with the art of particular periods and cultures. The course emphasizes training students to look closely at - and to write about - works of art.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nemerov, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 3: Introduction to World Architecture (CLASSICS 54)

This lecture course surveys the history of architecture and urbanism, from the first societies to the present, in Europe, West and East Asia, the Americas, and Africa. The course progresses by case studies of exemplary monuments and cities, and examines the built environment as both cultural artifact and architectural event. It considers the social and political circumstances of architectural invention as well as plumbing the depth of artistic context by which particular formal choices resonate with an established representational culture.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vivanco Antolin, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 101: Introduction to Greek Art I: The Archaic Period (CLASSICS 161)

This lecture course explores Greek art and culture from 1000-480. In the beginning archaic art forms are more abstract than life-like, closer to Calder than Michelangelo. While Homer describes the rippling muscles (and egos) of his heroes, vase-painters and sculptors prefer abstraction. This changes in the 7th C. as a result of commerce with the Near East and Egypt. Imported Near Eastern bronzes and ivories awaken the Greeks to a wider range of subjects, techniques and ambitions. Later in the century, Greeks in Egypt learn to carve hard stone from Egyptian masters. Throughout the 6th C. Greek artists assimilate what they had borrowed, compete with one another, defy their teachers, test the tolerance of the gods and eventually produce works of art that speak with a Greek accent. When the Persians invade the Acropolis in 480, they find artifacts with little trace of alien influence or imprint - omens of the defiant Greek military that would prevail at Salamis and Plataea.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 162B: Art and Social Criticism (AFRICAAM 102B, AMSTUD 102, CSRE 102A, FEMGEN 102)

Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition¿s agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP¿s emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago¿s The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson¿s Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon¿s paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades feminist artists Barbara Kruger and the Guerilla Girls have combined institutional critique and direct address into a provocative form of criticality. Recent art for social justice is reaching ever broadening publics by redrawing the role of artist and audience exemplified by the democratization of poster making and internet campaigns of Occupy and the Movement for Black Lives. We will also consider the collective aesthetic activisms in the Post-Occupy era including Global Ultra Luxury Faction, Climate Justice art projects, and the visual culture of Trump era mass protests. Why are each of these examples successful as influential and enduring markers of social criticism? What have these socially responsive practices contributed to our understanding of American history?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hertz, B. (PI)

ARTHIST 185: Arts of China in the Early Modern World, 1550-1800 (ARTHIST 385)

From the late Ming period (ca. 1600) to early 20th century Chinese arts. Topics include: urban arts and print culture; commodification of art; painting theories; self portrayals; art sponsorship, collecting, and ideological programs at the Qing imperial court; media and modernity in Shanghai; art and politics in early 20th century China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 186B: Asian American Art: 1850-Present (AMSTUD 186D, ASNAMST 186B)

In 1968, the Asian American Political Alliance began a successful campaign to jettison the designation "oriental" in favor of "Asian American." Given the term's recent genesis, what do we refer to when we discuss "Asian American art," and how can we speak of its history? This lecture class will explore these questions by considering artists, craftsmen, and laborers of Asian descent in the United States, beginning with Chinese immigration to California in the mid-nineteenth century, and extending through our current moment of globalization. We will consider their work alongside art and visual culture of the United States that engages "Asia" as a place, idea, or fantasy. Special attention will be paid to the crucial role Asia and Asian Americans played in movements including photography in San Francisco, Abstract Expressionism, Beat Culture, performance art, and New Queer Cinema. Artists include Chiura Obata, Isamu Noguchi, Yoko Ono, Nam June Paik, Manuel Ocampo, Zarina, and Wu Tsang, among many others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 203: Artists, Athletes, Courtesans and Crooks (CLASSICS 163)

The seminar covers a range of topics devoted to the makers of Greek art and artifacts, the ancient Greeks who used them in life and the afterlife, and the miscreants - from Lord Elgin to contemporary tomb-looters and dealers- whose deeds have damaged, deracinated and desecrated temples, sculptures and grave goods. Readings include ancient texts in translation, books and articles by eloquent experts, legal texts and lively page-turners. Classes meet in the seminar room and the Cantor Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 205B: Iberian World Architecture (ARTHIST 405B)

The cities and buildings of the Iberian World of Spain, Portugal, and Ibero-America are a testament to the role architecture played during the centuries-long process of colonization: to its power since 1492 to disrupt and transform pre-existing material and cultural landscapes and thus facilitate the conquest of the New World and its peoples. In addition to their survival as symbols of power for many decolonized nations, now as then, the conspicuous archives of a conflicted history the particular nature of these constructions (the sheer perplexing quality of their decoration, for instance, encompassing at once pre-Columbian and Baroque motifs and techniques) demands we pay attention to their complexity, richness, and sophistication as well and in doing so, question canonical definitions of style, chronology, or authorship. Besides pairing recent scholarship with the examination of case studies, the seminar also makes extensive use of the work of George Kubler to help us understand what it means to encounter, study, and write about an architectural phenomenon of transoceanic cohesion within competing chronologies, and how that experience should transform us in return: it is no coincidence that after pondering the art and architecture of the Iberian World and its roots, Kubler published his groundbreaking The Shape of Time.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vivanco Antolin, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 221E: Peripheral Dreams: The Art and Literature of Miró, Dalí, and other Surrealists in Catalonia (ILAC 281E)

Why was Salvador Dalí fascinated with the architecture of Gaudí? Why did André Breton, Paul Éluard and Federico García Lorca visit Barcelona? Moreover, why did Catalonia become such an important cradle for Surrealism? Why is the (Catalan) landscape such a relevant presence in the work of Miró and Dalí? Through a critical analysis and discussion of selected works of art and literature, this seminar focuses and follows the trajectories of Miró and Dalí, from Barcelona to Paris to New York, and explores the role of their Catalan background as a potentially essential factor in their own contributions to Surrealism and the reception of their work. The course will provide the materials and guide the student to conduct research on a specific work(s) of art, architecture, literature or cinema either by Miró, Dalí or one of his peers in relation to their cultural, social and political context. The course is intended for graduate students in Iberian and Comparative Literature, Art History, Cultural Studies, and related fields. Taught in English by Jordi Falgàs i Casanovas.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Falgas, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 245: Art, Business & the Law (SIW 245)

This course examines the intersection of art, business, and the law from a number of different angles, focusing on issues that impact our understanding of works of art and their circulation in the modern and contemporary periods. Topics range from individual case studies (e.g., Leonardo da Vinci; Richard Serra) to the consolidation of the art market, and include cultural heritage issues, problems of censorship, and conceptions of authorship and intellectual property.nnIn Autumn 2017-18 this course will be offered at Stanford in Washington in Washington, D.C. and enrollment is limited to students who are enrolled in the SIW Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 280B: The World of Chen Hongshou (1598-1652) (ARTHIST 480B)

Planned to coincide with a special international exhibition at the Berkeley Art Museum of works by the seventeenth century figure painter and print designer Chen Hongshou (1598-1652), this seminar will explore his art and cultural environment. Along with close study of his original paintings, we will study his connections with printmaking and publishing, fiction and drama culture, and his literary, social and patronage networks.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 294: Writing and the Visual: Photography and Truth

This course explores the longstanding association of photography with truth and the ways in which writing can direct attention to, elaborate on, or distract from the image. We will investigate the role of writing in making these truth claims for photography over the past two centuries and across photography¿s many discursive fields, from journalism, advertising, and scientific photographs, to works made by artists and amateurs. Among other questions, we will address the following: How has writing about photography engaged with assumptions of truthfulness? How have artists and writers challenged expectations for a straightforward relationship between photography and truth? Students will produce writing in relation to photographs that spans several artistic and art historical modes, from the critical and didactic to the expository and essayistic, with the aim of creating several polished pieces of writing, of varying lengths, ready for publication at the end of the quarter. Required course for Art History majors. WIM Course. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beil, K. (PI)

ARTHIST 295: Visual Arts Internship

Professional experience in a field related to the Visual Arts for six to ten weeks. Internships may include work for galleries, museums, art centers, and art publications. Students arrange the internship, provide a confirmation letter from the hosting institution, and must receive consent from the faculty coordinator to enroll in units. To supplement the internship students maintain a journal and write a research paper related to the experience and their area of academic interest. Evaluations from the student and the supervisor are submitted at the end of the internship. Restricted to declared majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 297: Honors Thesis Writing

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 298: Individual Work: Art History

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 385: Arts of China in the Early Modern World, 1550-1800 (ARTHIST 185)

From the late Ming period (ca. 1600) to early 20th century Chinese arts. Topics include: urban arts and print culture; commodification of art; painting theories; self portrayals; art sponsorship, collecting, and ideological programs at the Qing imperial court; media and modernity in Shanghai; art and politics in early 20th century China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 405B: Iberian World Architecture (ARTHIST 205B)

The cities and buildings of the Iberian World of Spain, Portugal, and Ibero-America are a testament to the role architecture played during the centuries-long process of colonization: to its power since 1492 to disrupt and transform pre-existing material and cultural landscapes and thus facilitate the conquest of the New World and its peoples. In addition to their survival as symbols of power for many decolonized nations, now as then, the conspicuous archives of a conflicted history the particular nature of these constructions (the sheer perplexing quality of their decoration, for instance, encompassing at once pre-Columbian and Baroque motifs and techniques) demands we pay attention to their complexity, richness, and sophistication as well and in doing so, question canonical definitions of style, chronology, or authorship. Besides pairing recent scholarship with the examination of case studies, the seminar also makes extensive use of the work of George Kubler to help us understand what it means to encounter, study, and write about an architectural phenomenon of transoceanic cohesion within competing chronologies, and how that experience should transform us in return: it is no coincidence that after pondering the art and architecture of the Iberian World and its roots, Kubler published his groundbreaking The Shape of Time.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vivanco Antolin, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 423B: Art That Moves: Affect, Kinesis, Mobility, 1300-1700

The early modern artist who imbues his subjects with movement is praised by his critics above all others, for he can do what is impossible: give life to dead matter. Movement is sometimes suggested, a trick of the eye that leads the spectator to anticipate a moment just about to unfold. Other times, the artist is said to conjure a living figure, whose flesh trembles with breath and a beating pulse. This seminar explores these and other examples of movement, instances that negotiate the relationship between depicted and actual movement with the emotion it stirs (affect). We will also study movement¿s relation to narrative and descriptive language (history and ekphrasis), and art¿s ability to move through time (Warburg¿s Pathosformel) and space (artworks and artists that travel). A study of movement uncovers multiple contradictions and possibilities in the history of art.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kinew, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 480B: The World of Chen Hongshou (1598-1652) (ARTHIST 280B)

Planned to coincide with a special international exhibition at the Berkeley Art Museum of works by the seventeenth century figure painter and print designer Chen Hongshou (1598-1652), this seminar will explore his art and cultural environment. Along with close study of his original paintings, we will study his connections with printmaking and publishing, fiction and drama culture, and his literary, social and patronage networks.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 502: Methods: Objecthood

What does it mean to be an object? Recent scholarship on the so-called material turn, including object-oriented-ontology, thing theory, and speculative realism likes to think it knows the answer. Yet as Frantz Fanon reminds us, objecthood is far more fraught and even violent than the simple imputation of agency. This seminar explores the idea of objecthood in art history, critical theory, and literature. Each week we will consider a different type of object, including paintings, photographs, furniture, props, and fetishes. How might art and material culture help us understand the processes and histories of objectification, and conversely, how might the study of objecthood open new paths of art historical inquiry that account for rather than reproduce difference? What are our ethical obligations to objects, and especially to our objects of study?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 600: Art History Bibliography and Library Methods

Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kam, D. (PI)

ARTHIST 610: Teaching Praxis

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 620: Qualifying Examination Preparation

For Art History Ph.D. candidates. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 640: Dissertation Proposal Preparation

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 650: Dissertation Research

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 660: Independent Study

For graduate students only. Approved independent research projects with individual faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 660E: Extended Seminar

May be repeated for credit. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 680: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree. Prerequisite: Art History Ph.D. candidate.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vinograd, R. (PI)
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