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PEDS 51N: How Discovery and Innovation Have Transformed Medicine

Topics include the science behind vaccines and why some refuse vaccination, how antibiotics are discovered and what can be done about increasing resistance to antibiotics, stem cells and their potential use, the role of genomics in modern medicine, development of drugs to treat HIV/AIDS, discovery of surfactant, personal responsibility in health and wellness and how technology relates to the "cost conundrum" of healthcare in the U.S. Appreciate important connections between science, discovery and human health and think critically about the potential impact of new discoveries on life and death, and their ethical and spiritual boundaries.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PEDS 60Q: Famine in the Modern World

This seminar is devoted to an investigation of famine ¿ mass starvation ¿ which throughout recorded history has been more lethal than war. Students will assess the relative weight of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine over the past two centuries. Students will acquire a background into the central facts about and controversies surrounding the major famines of modern history. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s, the Bengal famine of 1943-44, the Soviet famines of 1921-22 and 1932-33, the Great Famine in China in 1959-61, and the famines in Ethiopia and Somalia since the 1970s.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PEDS 65N: Understanding Children's Health Disparities

The social and economic factors that affect children and their health status. The principal sources of disparities in the health of children in the U.S. are not biologic, but social and economic. Topics include ethnic, cultural, and behavioral factors that affect children's health, both directly and indirectly; lack of health insurance; and current proposals for health care reform, focusing specifically on how they will impact existing health disparities among children.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barr, D. (PI)

PEDS 65Q: Understanding Children's Health Disparities

The social and economic factors that affect children and their health status. The principal sources of disparities in the health of children in the U.S. are not biologic, but social and economic. Topics include ethnic, cultural, and behavioral factors that affect children's health, both directly and indirectly; lack of health insurance; and current proposals for health care reform, focusing specifically on how they will impact existing health disparities among children. Includes instruction addressing written assignments and required oral presentations.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PEDS 102: Pre-field Course for Ghana Impact Abroad in Public Health and Children's Health

Enrollment restricted to undergraduates participating in Impact Abroad's Ghana Program. Focus is on understanding service-learning principles and the historical, social and political context of Ghana's health system.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Darmstadt, G. (PI)

PEDS 105: Health Promotion and the Campus Culture (PEDS 215)

Multidisciplinary perspectives of public health and health psychology. The prevalence of health risk behaviors on the contemporary college campus and the challenges of risk reduction. Students apply theoretical frameworks to peer health promotion campus projects. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor prior to first meeting.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 106: Exploring Happiness and Health (PEDS 206)

Evidence-based research findings, theoretical concepts and applied experiences related to emotional well-being, and physical and mental health. Topics include basic cognitive neuroscience and psychological research in pro-social emotions, such as gratitude, compassion, forgiveness and mindfulness practice. Course offers lecture, readings, and applied practices that enhance mental health, resiliency and well-being. Emphasis on issues relevant to high-achieving young adults.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 116: Alcohol Issues and the Campus Culture

Multidisciplinary perspectives of public health, health psychology, and sociology. The prevalence and scope of alcohol-related problems; challenges of risk reduction and intervention strategies. Students apply theoretical frameworks to alcohol-related research topics and projects. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor following first meeting.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PEDS 118: The Art of Creating Digital Health Education Content (PEDS 218)

Online educational content is becoming an increasingly important part of the way in which people learn. This course explores the process of making digital health education videos aimed at effectively supporting the learning of medical students, undergraduates, international community health workers and the general public. Knowing how to engage learners and effectively deliver important health education messages is a fundamental skill for future physicians, teachers and anyone who wishes to promote the health of those around them. Students work on creating their own digital content in pairs, outside of class meetings. Project-specific consultations with the instructor also take place outside of class time. Enrollment in PEDS 218 limited to MD students; undergraduates enroll in PEDS 118.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PEDS 130: Pediatrics Journal Club (PEDS 230)

Open to MD, graduate, and undergraduate students. Each session focuses on a current article in pediatric medicine. Discussions led by faculty experts in the area covered that session. Topics may range widely, depending on the available lieterature and students' interests. Students are expected to review the chosen article before class and participate in discussion. Discussion includes methodology and statistical analysis of each study and its relevance to pediatric practice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cohen, R. (PI); Cho, G. (TA)

PEDS 150: Social and Environmental Determinants of Health (PEDS 250)

How race/ethnicity and SES contribute to health disparities, how vulnerable populations are uniquely at health risk, and how the built environment relates to health and wellness. Topics include: gender, age, race/ethnicity, language, education, individual SES and neighborhood SES as related to health; individual and structural race bias; health needs of vulnerable populations (e.g., the homeless, the incarcerated, immigrant populations, children, and uninsured/underinsured); and environmental forces (e.g., urban design/planning, traffic/car culture, green space, housing, food access/culture, law enforcement, and media).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PEDS 159A: Addressing Child Health Disparities through Community-based Service Learning (PEDS 259A)

First quarter of a three-quarter service-learning practicum providing opportunities to engage in local community-academic projects aimed at reducing child health disparities. Stanford pediatric residents provide mentorship and guidance during the development and implementation of a community service and/or research project. Topics include principles of community engagement, community-engaged research methodologies, and practical aspects of working with community partners. Interest in health disparities, community engagement, community-based participatory research, reflective learning, and civic responsibility desired. Application required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 159B: Addressing Child Health Disparities through Community-based Service Learning (PEDS 259B)

Second quarter of a three-quarter service-learning practicum providing opportunities to engage in local community-academic projects aimed at reducing child health disparities. Stanford pediatric residents provide mentorship and guidance during the development and implementation of a community service and/or research project. Topics include principles of community engagement, community-engaged research methodologies, and practical aspects of working with community partners. Interest in health disparities, community engagement, community-based participatory research, reflective learning, and civic responsibility desired. Prerequisite: PEDS 159A/259A.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 159C: Addressing Child Health Disparities through Community-based Service Learning (PEDS 259C)

Third quarter of a three-quarter service-learning practicum providing opportunities to engage in local community-academic projects aimed at reducing child health disparities. Stanford pediatric residents provide mentorship and guidance during the development and implementation of a community service and/or research project. Topics include principles of community engagement, community-engaged research methodologies, and practical aspects of working with community partners. Interest in health disparities, community engagement, community-based participatory research, reflective learning, and civic responsibility desired. Prerequisite: PEDS 159B/259B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 199: Undergraduate Directed Reading/Research

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aby, J. (PI); Agarwal-Hashmi, R. (PI); Alexander, S. (PI); Almond, C. (PI); Alvira, C. (PI); Amieva, M. (PI); Ammerman, S. (PI); Amylon, M. (PI); Anand, K. (PI); Anderson, C. (PI); Ariagno, R. (PI); Arvin, A. (PI); Aye, T. (PI); Bacchetta, R. (PI); Bachrach, L. (PI); Balagtas, J. (PI); Barr, D. (PI); Bass, D. (PI); Benitz, W. (PI); Bentley, B. (PI); Bergman, D. (PI); Bernstein, D. (PI); Bernstein, J. (PI); Berquist, W. (PI); Bhargava, S. (PI); Bhutani, V. (PI); Bland, R. (PI); Blankenberg, F. (PI); Blankenburg, R. (PI); Bonifacio, S. (PI); Bressack, M. (PI); Browne, M. (PI); Buckingham, B. (PI); Buckway, C. (PI); Burgos, T. (PI); Butte, A. (PI); Butte, M. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carmichael, S. (PI); Castillo, R. (PI); Castro, R. (PI); Ceresnak, S. (PI); Chamberlain, L. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, S. (PI); Cheng, A. (PI); Chin, C. (PI); Cho, M. (PI); Chock, V. (PI); Cohen, H. (PI); Cohen, R. (PI); Conrad, C. (PI); Contag, C. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cornfield, D. (PI); Cox, K. (PI); Crain, L. (PI); Crawley, L. (PI); DOSSANTOS, L. (PI); Dahl, G. (PI); Darmstadt, G. (PI); Dekker, C. (PI); Dorenbaum, A. (PI); Druzin, M. (PI); Dubin, A. (PI); Edwards, M. (PI); Egan, E. (PI); El-Sayed, Y. (PI); Enns, G. (PI); Feinstein, J. (PI); Feldman, B. (PI); Feldman, H. (PI); Fernandes, S. (PI); Fisher, J. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Frankel, L. (PI); Frankovich, J. (PI); Franzon, D. (PI); Friedman, I. (PI); Gans, H. (PI); Garcia-Careag, M. (PI); Geertsma, F. (PI); Glader, B. (PI); Glasscock, G. (PI); Golden, N. (PI); Gould, J. (PI); Govindaswami, B. (PI); Grady Jr., S. (PI); Grimm, P. (PI); Gutierrez, K. (PI); Halamek, L. (PI); Halpern-Felsher, B. (PI); Hammer, G. (PI); Hammer, L. (PI); Harris, S. (PI); Hintz, S. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hood, K. (PI); Horwitz, S. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hudgins, L. (PI); Huffman, L. (PI); Hurwitz, M. (PI); Imperial, J. (PI); Ismail, M. (PI); Jeng, M. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kache, S. (PI); Kahana, M. (PI); Kapphahn, C. (PI); Kaufman, B. (PI); Kay, M. (PI); Kerner, J. (PI); Kharbanda, S. (PI); Kim, J. (PI); King, B. (PI); Koltai, P. (PI); Krawczeski, C. (PI); Krensky, A. (PI); LaBeaud, D. (PI); Lacayo, N. (PI); Lee, H. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Leonard, M. (PI); Lewis, D. (PI); Limon, J. (PI); Lin, M. (PI); Link, M. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Loe, I. (PI); Longhurst, C. (PI); Loutit, C. (PI); Lowe, H. (PI); Lowe, J. (PI); Luna-Fineman, S. (PI); Magnus, D. (PI); Maldonado, Y. (PI); Manning, M. (PI); Marina, N. (PI); Mark, J. (PI); Marsden, A. (PI); McCarty, J. (PI); McGhee, S. (PI); McNamara, N. (PI); Mellins, E. (PI); Mendoza, F. (PI); Milla, C. (PI); Misra, S. (PI); Moss, R. (PI); Murphy, D. (PI); Murphy, J. (PI); Nadeau, K. (PI); Narla, A. (PI); Neely, E. (PI); O'Brodovich, H. (PI); Oghalai, J. (PI); Olson, I. (PI); Pageler, N. (PI); Park, K. (PI); Peng, L. (PI); Penn, A. (PI); Perry, S. (PI); Pertofsky, C. (PI); Phibbs, C. (PI); Pico, E. (PI); Pizzo, P. (PI); Porteus, M. (PI); Potter, D. (PI); Prober, C. (PI); Profit, J. (PI); Punn, R. (PI); Rabinovitch, M. (PI); Ragavan, N. (PI); Rangaswami, A. (PI); Reddy, S. (PI); Rhine, W. (PI); Robinson, T. (PI); Rodriguez, E. (PI); Roncarolo, M. (PI); Rosenthal, D. (PI); Roth, S. (PI); Ruiz-Lozano, P. (PI); Sage, J. (PI); Sakamoto, K. (PI); Sandborg, C. (PI); Sanders, L. (PI); Sarwal, M. (PI); Schrijver, I. (PI); Schroeder, A. (PI); Seidel, F. (PI); Shah, A. (PI); Sharek, P. (PI); Shaw, G. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Shepard, E. (PI); Shin, A. (PI); Sibley, E. (PI); Sivakumar, D. (PI); Smith, A. (PI); Song, D. (PI); Sourkes, B. (PI); Spunt, S. (PI); Stevenson, D. (PI); Stirling, J. (PI); Stuart, A. (PI); Sutherland, S. (PI); Sweet-Cordero (PI); Tacy, T. (PI); Thienemann, M. (PI); Tierney, S. (PI); Twist, C. (PI); Van Meurs, K. (PI); Wall, D. (PI); Wang, C. (PI); Weinberg, K. (PI); Willert, J. (PI); Wilson, D. (PI); Wiryawan, B. (PI); Wise, P. (PI); Wong, C. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Wusthoff, C. (PI); Yen, S. (PI); Yuan, N. (PI); Contag, C. (SI); Bruce, J. (GP); Campbell, C. (GP); Travis, K. (GP)

PEDS 202A: Practical Applications for Qualitative Data Analysis

(Same as MED 200A) First quarter of a two-quarter course. Gain experience analyzing qualitative data using qualitative analysis software (i.e. Nvivo, Dedoose). Conduct analysis using your own or existing data sources. Explore multiple qualitative data analysis topics through class lectures, foundational readings and hands-on learning. Core topics include: grounded theory, qualitative data analysis approaches, software-based analysis, cleaning and coding of data, and interpreting data. Note: Preference will be given to medical students and undergraduate students that have successfully completed an introductory qualitative methods course. Enrollment in subsequent PEDS 202B required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 202B: Practical Applications for Qualitative Data Analysis

(Same as MED 200B) Second quarter of a two-quarter course provides hands-on experience summarizing qualitative data and describing findings for dissemination. Final course product will be a draft manuscript for submission with students listed as co-authors. Core topics include: identifying themes and representative quotes, community-engaged dissemination, abstract submission, posters, oral presentations, manuscript writing, and journal selection. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PEDS 202A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 202C: Qualitative Research Methods and Study Design

Introduction to qualitative research methods and study design. Students gain practical experience designing a qualitative study. Explore qualitative methods through class lectures, foundational readings and hands-on learning. Core topics include: theoretical frameworks, research questions, methodological approaches (i.e. interviews, focus groups, participant observation, photovoice), data collection, sampling, reliability and validity, and IRB protocols. This course is designed for students needing support to plan and design an independent research project (i.e. Med Scholars, Honors Thesis). Prerequisite: Consent from instructor for undergraduates.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 203: Flu Crew: Advanced Vaccinator Education

Students receive clinically relevant advanced training as preparation for Flu Crew clinic shifts both on- and off-campus during Autumn Quarter. Course includes informational sessions, speakers, and hands-on workshops focusing on the most clinically relevant influenza knowledge and skills. Topics covered include influenza epidemiology, misconceptions, patient education, vaccine selection, vaccinator Spanish, and advanced vaccination technique. Students required to attend three clinics.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PEDS 206: Exploring Happiness and Health (PEDS 106)

Evidence-based research findings, theoretical concepts and applied experiences related to emotional well-being, and physical and mental health. Topics include basic cognitive neuroscience and psychological research in pro-social emotions, such as gratitude, compassion, forgiveness and mindfulness practice. Course offers lecture, readings, and applied practices that enhance mental health, resiliency and well-being. Emphasis on issues relevant to high-achieving young adults.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 211: Medical-Legal Issues in Children's Health

(Same as LAW 643) Explores the link between poverty and children's health and how the medical and legal fields can work together to improve health outcomes for low income children. Weekly class meetings covering medical legal issues such as asthma immigration, health insurance; intake interviews with patient families and analysis of their medical legal issues; group project focused on a medical legal policy issue; final paper cowritten by law and medical students. May be taken for 2 units (weekly 2.5 hour seminar meetings only), 3 units (participation in either intake interviews or policy work) or 4 units (full participation in all course components). Prerequisite: instructor consent. Preference to students committed to full participation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PEDS 212: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (HUMBIO 122M)

(Undergraduate students must enroll in HUMBIO 122M. MD and Graduate students enroll in PEDS 212) An emerging area of inquiry. Topics include: global migration trends, health Issues/aspects of migration, healthcare and the needs of immigrants in the US, and migrants as healthcare providers: a new area of inquiry in the US. Class is structured to include: lectures lead by the instructor and possible guest speakers; seminar, discussion and case study sessions led by students. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rodriguez, E. (PI)

PEDS 213: Critical Issues in Child Health

Develop an integrated understanding of the physical and psychosocial health factors from birth through adolescence that result in a healthy child. Uses a multidisciplinary perspective to review the basic physiology and pathophysiology associated with common childhood illnesses and integratenthis with socio-environmental factors that influence child health. Students gain perspective on child health challenges around the world and develop a broad understanding of how the cultural context influences and defines the individual living therein.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PEDS 214: Introduction to Pediatrics Lecture Series

Introduction to the various aspects of pediatrics, directed at pre-clinical MD students, undergraduates, or graduate students. Course composed of interactive lectures conducted by pediatric faculty on subjects ranging from normal development to topics in different pediatric subspecialties. current issues in the field, and opportunities for students considering this specialty. Speakers also touch on their career paths and choices and are available to answer questions about their areas of interest. By special arrangement students may have the opportunity to shadow general pediatricians or pediatric specialists. Intended to stimulate interest in pediatrics and to inform students about the breadth of the field.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cohen, R. (PI); Zhou, M. (GP)

PEDS 215: Health Promotion and the Campus Culture (PEDS 105)

Multidisciplinary perspectives of public health and health psychology. The prevalence of health risk behaviors on the contemporary college campus and the challenges of risk reduction. Students apply theoretical frameworks to peer health promotion campus projects. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor prior to first meeting.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 218: The Art of Creating Digital Health Education Content (PEDS 118)

Online educational content is becoming an increasingly important part of the way in which people learn. This course explores the process of making digital health education videos aimed at effectively supporting the learning of medical students, undergraduates, international community health workers and the general public. Knowing how to engage learners and effectively deliver important health education messages is a fundamental skill for future physicians, teachers and anyone who wishes to promote the health of those around them. Students work on creating their own digital content in pairs, outside of class meetings. Project-specific consultations with the instructor also take place outside of class time. Enrollment in PEDS 218 limited to MD students; undergraduates enroll in PEDS 118.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PEDS 222: Beyond Health Care: the effects of social policies on health (HUMBIO 122)

Available evidence at the national and cross-country level linking social welfare interventions and health outcomes. If and how non-health programs and policies could have an impact on positive health outcomes. Evaluation of social programs and policies that buffer the negative health impact of economic instability and unemployment among adult workers and their children. Examination of safety nets, including public health insurance, income maintenance programs, and disability insurance. Prerequisites: HumBio 4B or equivalent, and some background in research methods and statistics, or Instructor permission.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rodriguez, E. (PI)

PEDS 223: Human Rights and Global Health

Open to medical students, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates. Examines the newly emerging field of human rights and global health, beginning with the essential background into the field of human rights, and the recent emergence of health as a human right. Emphasis is on the pioneering work of Dr. Paul Farmer and Partners in Health and the challenge he and his organization have posed to the conventional wisdom about approaches to combating poor health and disease worldwide. Topics include the "big three" infectious diseases -- tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS -- as well as emerging infectious diseases, clean water and sanitation, and malnutrition and famine.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

PEDS 224: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 224C, HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

PEDS 225: Humanitarian Aid and Politics

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the moral dilemmas and political realities that complicate the delivery of humanitarian aid, especially when undertaken by the United Nations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Emphasis is on what humanitarians call "complex humanitarian emergencies": crises often characterized by famine and/or epidemic disease and typically the result of war and/or civil war. Provides background into the history of humanitarian aid, though focus is on the post-Cold War era, up to the recent crises in Libya and Syria.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

PEDS 226: Famine in the Modern World (HISTORY 226E, HISTORY 326E)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the major famines of modern history, the controversies surrounding them, and the reasons that famine persists in our increasingly globalized world. Focus is on the relative importance of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine in the modern world. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s; the Bengal famine of 1943-44; the Soviet famines of 1921-22 and 1932-33; China's Great Famine of 1959-61; the Ethiopian famines of the 1970s and 80s, and the Somalia famines of the 1990s and of 2011.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

PEDS 227: Introduction to Pediatric Specialties

The aim of this course is to provide pre-clinical MD students with exposure to the wide variety of medical specialties within pediatrics. Weekly lectures will feature physicians from fields such as Pediatric Cardiology, Pediatric Neurology, Pediatric Infectious Disease, and Pediatric Surgery. Physician speakers will discuss their daily work, why they selected their chosen field, their career path, and their pursuits outside of clinical medicine. The physicians will also provide students with advice and guidance on how to define and successfully pursue their goals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PEDS 230: Pediatrics Journal Club (PEDS 130)

Open to MD, graduate, and undergraduate students. Each session focuses on a current article in pediatric medicine. Discussions led by faculty experts in the area covered that session. Topics may range widely, depending on the available lieterature and students' interests. Students are expected to review the chosen article before class and participate in discussion. Discussion includes methodology and statistical analysis of each study and its relevance to pediatric practice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cohen, R. (PI); Cho, G. (TA)

PEDS 246: Developmental Disabilities: From Biology to Policy (HUMBIO 146D)

Fifteen percent of US children have disabilities. While advances in medicine and technology have increased life expectancy for these children, health care delivery, education, and public attitudes have not kept pace. Students in this course will learn the possibilities and limitations of new biomedical treatments of Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and autism. Students will also evaluate the impact of public policy initiatives, such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Americans with Disabilities Act on inclusion and participation in society. Prerequisite: HUMBIO 25SI or Human Biology Core or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PEDS 250: Social and Environmental Determinants of Health (PEDS 150)

How race/ethnicity and SES contribute to health disparities, how vulnerable populations are uniquely at health risk, and how the built environment relates to health and wellness. Topics include: gender, age, race/ethnicity, language, education, individual SES and neighborhood SES as related to health; individual and structural race bias; health needs of vulnerable populations (e.g., the homeless, the incarcerated, immigrant populations, children, and uninsured/underinsured); and environmental forces (e.g., urban design/planning, traffic/car culture, green space, housing, food access/culture, law enforcement, and media).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PEDS 251A: Medical Ethics I

Required for Scholarly Concentration in Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities. The field of bioethics, including theoretical approaches to bioethical problems. Contemporary controversies and clinical cases. Values that arise in different situations and clinical encounters. Issues include: genetics and stem cell research, rationing, ethical issues in care at the end of life, organ transplantation issues.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 251B: Medical Ethics II

The integration of ethical theory with applications of theory or conceptual issues in medicine, health care, and the life and social sciences. Topic varies by year. Possible topics include: ethical issues in stem cell research; death and dying; genetics and ethics; concepts of health and disease; the ethics of international research; and ethical implications of new reproductive technology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 254: Pediatric Physical Findings Rounds

Pediatric patients with specific physical findings and hospitalized at LPCH are identified and introduced to students. Students in small groups examine patients at the bedside to note the physical finding and discuss it within the context of the patient's clinical problem. Emphasis is on basic science discussion to understand the cause of the finding.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Prober, C. (PI)

PEDS 255: Scientific Integrity: Responsible Conduct of Research

This course introduces standard and acceptable practices in the life sciences, with an emphasis on responsibilities in research activities such as record keeping, data treatment, authorship, peer review, mentoring and participation in research that engages human or animal subjects. Conflicts of interest, ownership of date and other intellectual property and potential problems stemming from use of data from human genetics or stem cell experiments are examples of additional topics for discussion. nnOpen to upper-level undergraduate students, medical students, graduate students and M.D. and Ph.D. postdoctoral fellows. This course is required for trainees supported by the NIH Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology training program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 258: Developing and Defining Strong Community-Academic Partnerships

Applying the principles of community-based participatory research to medical scholars research projects. Strategies for developing strong, equitable and sustainable community-academic partnerships. Identify and asses proposed faculty mentors and community partners, and establish proposed goals and objectives for med scholars research.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PEDS 259A: Addressing Child Health Disparities through Community-based Service Learning (PEDS 159A)

First quarter of a three-quarter service-learning practicum providing opportunities to engage in local community-academic projects aimed at reducing child health disparities. Stanford pediatric residents provide mentorship and guidance during the development and implementation of a community service and/or research project. Topics include principles of community engagement, community-engaged research methodologies, and practical aspects of working with community partners. Interest in health disparities, community engagement, community-based participatory research, reflective learning, and civic responsibility desired. Application required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 259B: Addressing Child Health Disparities through Community-based Service Learning (PEDS 159B)

Second quarter of a three-quarter service-learning practicum providing opportunities to engage in local community-academic projects aimed at reducing child health disparities. Stanford pediatric residents provide mentorship and guidance during the development and implementation of a community service and/or research project. Topics include principles of community engagement, community-engaged research methodologies, and practical aspects of working with community partners. Interest in health disparities, community engagement, community-based participatory research, reflective learning, and civic responsibility desired. Prerequisite: PEDS 159A/259A.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 259C: Addressing Child Health Disparities through Community-based Service Learning (PEDS 159C)

Third quarter of a three-quarter service-learning practicum providing opportunities to engage in local community-academic projects aimed at reducing child health disparities. Stanford pediatric residents provide mentorship and guidance during the development and implementation of a community service and/or research project. Topics include principles of community engagement, community-engaged research methodologies, and practical aspects of working with community partners. Interest in health disparities, community engagement, community-based participatory research, reflective learning, and civic responsibility desired. Prerequisite: PEDS 159B/259B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 260: Best Practices for Bridging Disparities

Course enhances student understanding of health inequities and the structural and cultural competencies that impact health care quality and distribution. Topics covered include: structural competency vs cultural competency; changes in primary care; adverse chidlhood events; bioethics and race; physician bias; criminal justice and health; effective health interventions and steps forward; resource distribution.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PEDS 280: Early Clinical Experience

Provides students an opportunity to see patients and correlate clinical findings with preclinical coursework. Students spend a half day or a full day in a pediatric subspecialty clinic (e.g., infectious diseases, endocrine, gastroenterology), participate in conferences and accompany attending physicians. Students have directed reading and meet with faculty for one hour per week to discuss their reading.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Aby, J. (PI); Agarwal-Hashmi, R. (PI); Alexander, S. (PI); Almond, C. (PI); Alvira, C. (PI); Amieva, M. (PI); Ammerman, S. (PI); Amylon, M. (PI); Anand, K. (PI); Anderson, C. (PI); Ariagno, R. (PI); Arvin, A. (PI); Aye, T. (PI); Bacchetta, R. (PI); Bachrach, L. (PI); Balagtas, J. (PI); Barr, D. (PI); Bass, D. (PI); Benitz, W. (PI); Bentley, B. (PI); Bergman, D. (PI); Bernstein, D. (PI); Bernstein, J. (PI); Berquist, W. (PI); Bhargava, S. (PI); Bhutani, V. (PI); Bland, R. (PI); Blankenberg, F. (PI); Blankenburg, R. (PI); Bonifacio, S. (PI); Bressack, M. (PI); Browne, M. (PI); Buckingham, B. (PI); Buckway, C. (PI); Burgos, T. (PI); Butte, A. (PI); Butte, M. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carmichael, S. (PI); Castillo, R. (PI); Castro, R. (PI); Ceresnak, S. (PI); Chamberlain, L. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, S. (PI); Cheng, A. (PI); Chin, C. (PI); Cho, M. (PI); Chock, V. (PI); Cohen, H. (PI); Cohen, R. (PI); Conrad, C. (PI); Contag, C. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cornfield, D. (PI); Cox, K. (PI); Crain, L. (PI); Crawley, L. (PI); DOSSANTOS, L. (PI); Dahl, G. (PI); Darmstadt, G. (PI); Dekker, C. (PI); Dorenbaum, A. (PI); Druzin, M. (PI); Dubin, A. (PI); Edwards, M. (PI); Egan, E. (PI); El-Sayed, Y. (PI); Enns, G. (PI); Feinstein, J. (PI); Feldman, B. (PI); Feldman, H. (PI); Fernandes, S. (PI); Fisher, J. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Frankel, L. (PI); Frankovich, J. (PI); Franzon, D. (PI); Friedman, I. (PI); Gans, H. (PI); Garcia-Careag, M. (PI); Geertsma, F. (PI); Glader, B. (PI); Glasscock, G. (PI); Golden, N. (PI); Gould, J. (PI); Govindaswami, B. (PI); Grady Jr., S. (PI); Grimm, P. (PI); Gutierrez, K. (PI); Halamek, L. (PI); Halpern-Felsher, B. (PI); Hammer, G. (PI); Hammer, L. (PI); Harris, S. (PI); Hintz, S. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hood, K. (PI); Horwitz, S. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hudgins, L. (PI); Huffman, L. (PI); Hurwitz, M. (PI); Imperial, J. (PI); Ismail, M. (PI); Jeng, M. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kache, S. (PI); Kahana, M. (PI); Kapphahn, C. (PI); Kaufman, B. (PI); Kay, M. (PI); Kerner, J. (PI); Kharbanda, S. (PI); Kim, J. (PI); Koltai, P. (PI); Krawczeski, C. (PI); Krensky, A. (PI); LaBeaud, D. (PI); Lacayo, N. (PI); Lee, H. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Leonard, M. (PI); Lewis, D. (PI); Limon, J. (PI); Lin, M. (PI); Link, M. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Loe, I. (PI); Longhurst, C. (PI); Loutit, C. (PI); Lowe, H. (PI); Lowe, J. (PI); Luna-Fineman, S. (PI); Magnus, D. (PI); Maldonado, Y. (PI); Manning, M. (PI); Marina, N. (PI); Mark, J. (PI); Marsden, A. (PI); McCarty, J. (PI); McGhee, S. (PI); McNamara, N. (PI); Mellins, E. (PI); Mendoza, F. (PI); Milla, C. (PI); Misra, S. (PI); Moss, R. (PI); Murphy, D. (PI); Murphy, J. (PI); Nadeau, K. (PI); Narla, A. (PI); Neely, E. (PI); O'Brodovich, H. (PI); Oghalai, J. (PI); Olson, I. (PI); Pageler, N. (PI); Park, K. (PI); Peng, L. (PI); Penn, A. (PI); Perry, S. (PI); Phibbs, C. (PI); Pico, E. (PI); Pizzo, P. (PI); Porteus, M. (PI); Potter, D. (PI); Prober, C. (PI); Profit, J. (PI); Punn, R. (PI); Rabinovitch, M. (PI); Ragavan, N. (PI); Rangaswami, A. (PI); Reddy, S. (PI); Rhine, W. (PI); Robinson, T. (PI); Rodriguez, E. (PI); Roncarolo, M. (PI); Rosenthal, D. (PI); Roth, S. (PI); Ruiz-Lozano, P. (PI); Sage, J. (PI); Sakamoto, K. (PI); Sandborg, C. (PI); Sanders, L. (PI); Sarwal, M. (PI); Schrijver, I. (PI); Schroeder, A. (PI); Seidel, F. (PI); Shah, A. (PI); Sharek, P. (PI); Shaw, G. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Shepard, E. (PI); Shin, A. (PI); Sibley, E. (PI); Sivakumar, D. (PI); Smith, A. (PI); Song, D. (PI); Sourkes, B. (PI); Spunt, S. (PI); Stevenson, D. (PI); Stirling, J. (PI); Stuart, A. (PI); Sutherland, S. (PI); Sweet-Cordero (PI); Tacy, T. (PI); Tierney, S. (PI); Twist, C. (PI); Van Meurs, K. (PI); Wall, D. (PI); Wang, C. (PI); Weinberg, K. (PI); Willert, J. (PI); Wilson, D. (PI); Wiryawan, B. (PI); Wise, P. (PI); Wong, C. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Wusthoff, C. (PI); Yen, S. (PI); Yuan, N. (PI); Bruce, J. (GP)

PEDS 281: Childhood Chronic Illness: Impact on Family Development

The Pals Program is a volunteer activity serving Lucile Packard Children's Hospital chronically ill patients and their siblings. Modeled after the Big Brother/Big Sister Program, Pals matches first- and second-year medical students with pediatric patients or their siblings. The patients and/or their siblings enjoy the support and companionship of their Pals, and the medical students learn firsthand about the emotional and social aspects of chronic illness during childhood. Pals meet regularly throughout the year to participate in fun activities such as movies, ball games, museums, and picnics. The activities and personal relationships are overseen by the LPCH Pals social worker. Bimonthly class meetings introduce the students to pediatric chronic diseases such as leukemia, cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. The class brings in physicians to give the medical perspective as well as patients and families to get their perspective. Prerequisite: approval of the LPCH social worker for Pals.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Berquist, W. (PI)

PEDS 282: Pregnancy, Birth, and Infancy (OBGYN 282)

Comprehensive clinical experience where pre-clinical medical students follow pregnant women receiving care at Stanford hospitals to attend prenatal visits, delivery, and postnatal visits. Continuity clinic format, combined with didactic lessons and discussion seminars. Students are exposed to clinical activities in a meaningful context, bolstering classroom studies in anatomy, physiology, embryology and human development, and emphasizing social, economic, and personal issues related to medicine. This program spans one quarter, covering topics related to pregnancy, labor and delivery and newborn care. In addition to clinic experiences, students are expected to spend 1-2 hours/week in lectures and to complete a reflection of their experiences in the course. Prerequisite: pre-clinical medical student.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PEDS 299: Directed Reading in Pediatrics

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aby, J. (PI); Agarwal-Hashmi, R. (PI); Alexander, S. (PI); Almond, C. (PI); Alvira, C. (PI); Amieva, M. (PI); Ammerman, S. (PI); Amylon, M. (PI); Anand, K. (PI); Anderson, C. (PI); Ariagno, R. (PI); Arvin, A. (PI); Aye, T. (PI); Bacchetta, R. (PI); Bachrach, L. (PI); Balagtas, J. (PI); Barr, D. (PI); Bass, D. (PI); Benitz, W. (PI); Bentley, B. (PI); Bergman, D. (PI); Bernstein, D. (PI); Bernstein, J. (PI); Berquist, W. (PI); Bhargava, S. (PI); Bhutani, V. (PI); Bland, R. (PI); Blankenberg, F. (PI); Blankenburg, R. (PI); Bonifacio, S. (PI); Bressack, M. (PI); Browne, M. (PI); Buckingham, B. (PI); Buckway, C. (PI); Burgos, T. (PI); Butte, A. (PI); Butte, M. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carmichael, S. (PI); Castillo, R. (PI); Castro, R. (PI); Ceresnak, S. (PI); Chamberlain, L. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, S. (PI); Cheng, A. (PI); Chin, C. (PI); Cho, M. (PI); Chock, V. (PI); Cohen, H. (PI); Cohen, R. (PI); Conrad, C. (PI); Contag, C. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cornfield, D. (PI); Cox, K. (PI); Crain, L. (PI); Crawley, L. (PI); DOSSANTOS, L. (PI); Dahl, G. (PI); Darmstadt, G. (PI); Dekker, C. (PI); Dorenbaum, A. (PI); Druzin, M. (PI); Dubin, A. (PI); Edwards, M. (PI); Egan, E. (PI); El-Sayed, Y. (PI); Enns, G. (PI); Feinstein, J. (PI); Feldman, B. (PI); Feldman, H. (PI); Fernandes, S. (PI); Fisher, J. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Frankel, L. (PI); Frankovich, J. (PI); Franzon, D. (PI); Friedman, I. (PI); Gans, H. (PI); Garcia-Careag, M. (PI); Geertsma, F. (PI); Glader, B. (PI); Glasscock, G. (PI); Golden, N. (PI); Gould, J. (PI); Govindaswami, B. (PI); Grady Jr., S. (PI); Grimm, P. (PI); Gutierrez, K. (PI); Halamek, L. (PI); Halpern-Felsher, B. (PI); Hammer, G. (PI); Hammer, L. (PI); Harris, S. (PI); Hintz, S. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hood, K. (PI); Horwitz, S. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hudgins, L. (PI); Huffman, L. (PI); Hurwitz, M. (PI); Imperial, J. (PI); Ismail, M. (PI); Jeng, M. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kache, S. (PI); Kahana, M. (PI); Kapphahn, C. (PI); Kaufman, B. (PI); Kay, M. (PI); Kerner, J. (PI); Kharbanda, S. (PI); Kim, J. (PI); Koltai, P. (PI); Krawczeski, C. (PI); Krensky, A. (PI); LaBeaud, D. (PI); Lacayo, N. (PI); Lee, H. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Leonard, M. (PI); Lewis, D. (PI); Limon, J. (PI); Lin, M. (PI); Link, M. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Loe, I. (PI); Longhurst, C. (PI); Loutit, C. (PI); Lowe, H. (PI); Lowe, J. (PI); Luna-Fineman, S. (PI); Magnus, D. (PI); Maldonado, Y. (PI); Manning, M. (PI); Marina, N. (PI); Mark, J. (PI); Marsden, A. (PI); McCarty, J. (PI); McGhee, S. (PI); McNamara, N. (PI); Mellins, E. (PI); Mendoza, F. (PI); Milla, C. (PI); Misra, S. (PI); Moss, R. (PI); Murphy, D. (PI); Murphy, J. (PI); Nadeau, K. (PI); Narla, A. (PI); Neely, E. (PI); O'Brodovich, H. (PI); Oghalai, J. (PI); Olson, I. (PI); Pageler, N. (PI); Park, K. (PI); Peng, L. (PI); Penn, A. (PI); Perry, S. (PI); Phibbs, C. (PI); Pico, E. (PI); Pizzo, P. (PI); Porteus, M. (PI); Potter, D. (PI); Prober, C. (PI); Profit, J. (PI); Punn, R. (PI); Rabinovitch, M. (PI); Ragavan, N. (PI); Rangaswami, A. (PI); Reddy, S. (PI); Rhine, W. (PI); Robinson, T. (PI); Rodriguez, E. (PI); Roncarolo, M. (PI); Rosenthal, D. (PI); Roth, S. (PI); Ruiz-Lozano, P. (PI); Sage, J. (PI); Sakamoto, K. (PI); Sandborg, C. (PI); Sanders, L. (PI); Sarwal, M. (PI); Schrijver, I. (PI); Schroeder, A. (PI); Seidel, F. (PI); Shah, A. (PI); Sharek, P. (PI); Shaw, G. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Shepard, E. (PI); Shin, A. (PI); Sibley, E. (PI); Sivakumar, D. (PI); Smith, A. (PI); Song, D. (PI); Sourkes, B. (PI); Spunt, S. (PI); Stevenson, D. (PI); Stirling, J. (PI); Stuart, A. (PI); Sutherland, S. (PI); Sweet-Cordero (PI); Tacy, T. (PI); Tierney, S. (PI); Twist, C. (PI); Van Meurs, K. (PI); Wall, D. (PI); Wang, C. (PI); Weinberg, K. (PI); Willert, J. (PI); Wilson, D. (PI); Wiryawan, B. (PI); Wise, P. (PI); Wong, C. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Wusthoff, C. (PI); Yen, S. (PI); Yuan, N. (PI); Bruce, J. (GP)

PEDS 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Aby, J. (PI); Agarwal-Hashmi, R. (PI); Alexander, S. (PI); Almond, C. (PI); Alvira, C. (PI); Amieva, M. (PI); Ammerman, S. (PI); Amylon, M. (PI); Anand, K. (PI); Anderson, C. (PI); Anoshiravani, A. (PI); Ariagno, R. (PI); Arvin, A. (PI); Aye, T. (PI); Bacchetta, R. (PI); Bachrach, L. (PI); Balagtas, J. (PI); Barr, D. (PI); Bass, D. (PI); Benitz, W. (PI); Bentley, B. (PI); Bergman, D. (PI); Bernstein, D. (PI); Bernstein, J. (PI); Berquist, W. (PI); Bhargava, S. (PI); Bhutani, V. (PI); Bland, R. (PI); Blankenberg, F. (PI); Blankenburg, R. (PI); Bonifacio, S. (PI); Bressack, M. (PI); Browne, M. (PI); Buckingham, B. (PI); Buckway, C. (PI); Burgos, T. (PI); Butte, A. (PI); Butte, M. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carmichael, S. (PI); Castillo, R. (PI); Castro, R. (PI); Ceresnak, S. (PI); Chamberlain, L. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, S. (PI); Cheng, A. (PI); Chin, C. (PI); Cho, M. (PI); Chock, V. (PI); Cohen, H. (PI); Cohen, R. (PI); Conrad, C. (PI); Contag, C. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cornfield, D. (PI); Cox, K. (PI); Crain, L. (PI); Crawley, L. (PI); DOSSANTOS, L. (PI); Dahl, G. (PI); Darmstadt, G. (PI); Dekker, C. (PI); Dorenbaum, A. (PI); Druzin, M. (PI); Dubin, A. (PI); Edwards, M. (PI); Egan, E. (PI); El-Sayed, Y. (PI); Enns, G. (PI); Feinstein, J. (PI); Feldman, B. (PI); Feldman, H. (PI); Fernandes, S. (PI); Fisher, J. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Frankel, L. (PI); Frankovich, J. (PI); Franzon, D. (PI); Friedman, I. (PI); Gans, H. (PI); Garcia-Careag, M. (PI); Geertsma, F. (PI); Glader, B. (PI); Glasscock, G. (PI); Golden, N. (PI); Gould, J. (PI); Govindaswami, B. (PI); Grady Jr., S. (PI); Grimm, P. (PI); Gutierrez, K. (PI); Halamek, L. (PI); Halpern-Felsher, B. (PI); Hammer, G. (PI); Hammer, L. (PI); Harris, S. (PI); Hintz, S. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hood, K. (PI); Horwitz, S. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hudgins, L. (PI); Huffman, L. (PI); Hurwitz, M. (PI); Imperial, J. (PI); Ismail, M. (PI); Jeng, M. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kache, S. (PI); Kahana, M. (PI); Kapphahn, C. (PI); Kaufman, B. (PI); Kay, M. (PI); Kerner, J. (PI); Kharbanda, S. (PI); Kim, J. (PI); Koltai, P. (PI); Krawczeski, C. (PI); Krensky, A. (PI); LaBeaud, D. (PI); Lacayo, N. (PI); Lee, H. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Leonard, M. (PI); Lewis, D. (PI); Limon, J. (PI); Lin, M. (PI); Link, M. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Loe, I. (PI); Longhurst, C. (PI); Loutit, C. (PI); Lowe, H. (PI); Lowe, J. (PI); Luna-Fineman, S. (PI); Magnus, D. (PI); Maldonado, Y. (PI); Manning, M. (PI); Marina, N. (PI); Mark, J. (PI); Marsden, A. (PI); McCarty, J. (PI); McGhee, S. (PI); McNamara, N. (PI); Mellins, E. (PI); Mendoza, F. (PI); Milla, C. (PI); Misra, S. (PI); Moss, R. (PI); Murphy, D. (PI); Murphy, J. (PI); Nadeau, K. (PI); Narla, A. (PI); Neely, E. (PI); O'Brodovich, H. (PI); Oghalai, J. (PI); Olson, I. (PI); Pageler, N. (PI); Park, K. (PI); Peng, L. (PI); Penn, A. (PI); Perry, S. (PI); Pertofsky, C. (PI); Phibbs, C. (PI); Pico, E. (PI); Pizzo, P. (PI); Porteus, M. (PI); Potter, D. (PI); Prober, C. (PI); Profit, J. (PI); Punn, R. (PI); Rabinovitch, M. (PI); Ragavan, N. (PI); Rangaswami, A. (PI); Rassbach, C. (PI); Reddy, S. (PI); Rhine, W. (PI); Robinson, T. (PI); Rodriguez, E. (PI); Roncarolo, M. (PI); Rosenthal, D. (PI); Roth, S. (PI); Ruiz-Lozano, P. (PI); Sage, J. (PI); Sakamoto, K. (PI); Sandborg, C. (PI); Sanders, L. (PI); Sarwal, M. (PI); Schrijver, I. (PI); Schroeder, A. (PI); Seidel, F. (PI); Shah, A. (PI); Sharek, P. (PI); Shaw, G. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Shepard, E. (PI); Shin, A. (PI); Sibley, E. (PI); Sivakumar, D. (PI); Smith, A. (PI); Song, D. (PI); Sourkes, B. (PI); Spunt, S. (PI); Stevenson, D. (PI); Stirling, J. (PI); Stuart, A. (PI); Sutherland, S. (PI); Sweet-Cordero (PI); Tacy, T. (PI); Tierney, S. (PI); Twist, C. (PI); Van Meurs, K. (PI); Wall, D. (PI); Wang, C. (PI); Weinberg, K. (PI); Willert, J. (PI); Wilson, D. (PI); Wiryawan, B. (PI); Wise, P. (PI); Wong, C. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Wusthoff, C. (PI); Yen, S. (PI); Yuan, N. (PI); Bruce, J. (GP)

PEDS 399: Graduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aby, J. (PI); Agarwal-Hashmi, R. (PI); Alexander, S. (PI); Almond, C. (PI); Alvira, C. (PI); Amieva, M. (PI); Ammerman, S. (PI); Amylon, M. (PI); Anand, K. (PI); Anderson, C. (PI); Ariagno, R. (PI); Arvin, A. (PI); Aye, T. (PI); Bacchetta, R. (PI); Bachrach, L. (PI); Balagtas, J. (PI); Barr, D. (PI); Bass, D. (PI); Benitz, W. (PI); Bentley, B. (PI); Bergman, D. (PI); Bernstein, D. (PI); Bernstein, J. (PI); Berquist, W. (PI); Bhargava, S. (PI); Bhutani, V. (PI); Bland, R. (PI); Blankenberg, F. (PI); Blankenburg, R. (PI); Bonifacio, S. (PI); Bressack, M. (PI); Browne, M. (PI); Buckingham, B. (PI); Buckway, C. (PI); Burgos, T. (PI); Butte, A. (PI); Butte, M. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carmichael, S. (PI); Castillo, R. (PI); Castro, R. (PI); Castro Sweet, C. (PI); Ceresnak, S. (PI); Chamberlain, L. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, S. (PI); Cheng, A. (PI); Chin, C. (PI); Cho, M. (PI); Chock, V. (PI); Cohen, H. (PI); Cohen, R. (PI); Conrad, C. (PI); Contag, C. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cornfield, D. (PI); Cox, K. (PI); Crain, L. (PI); Crawley, L. (PI); DOSSANTOS, L. (PI); Dahl, G. (PI); Darmstadt, G. (PI); Dekker, C. (PI); Dorenbaum, A. (PI); Druzin, M. (PI); Dubin, A. (PI); Edwards, M. (PI); Egan, E. (PI); El-Sayed, Y. (PI); Enns, G. (PI); Feinstein, J. (PI); Feldman, B. (PI); Feldman, H. (PI); Fernandes, S. (PI); Fisher, J. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Frankel, L. (PI); Frankovich, J. (PI); Franzon, D. (PI); Friedman, I. (PI); Gans, H. (PI); Garcia-Careag, M. (PI); Geertsma, F. (PI); Glader, B. (PI); Glasscock, G. (PI); Golden, N. (PI); Gould, J. (PI); Govindaswami, B. (PI); Grady Jr., S. (PI); Grimm, P. (PI); Gutierrez, K. (PI); Halamek, L. (PI); Halpern-Felsher, B. (PI); Hammer, G. (PI); Hammer, L. (PI); Harris, S. (PI); Hintz, S. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hood, K. (PI); Horwitz, S. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hudgins, L. (PI); Huffman, L. (PI); Hurwitz, M. (PI); Imperial, J. (PI); Ismail, M. (PI); Jeng, M. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kache, S. (PI); Kahana, M. (PI); Kapphahn, C. (PI); Kaufman, B. (PI); Kay, M. (PI); Kerner, J. (PI); Kharbanda, S. (PI); Kim, J. (PI); Koltai, P. (PI); Krawczeski, C. (PI); Krensky, A. (PI); LaBeaud, D. (PI); Lacayo, N. (PI); Lee, H. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Leonard, M. (PI); Lewis, D. (PI); Limon, J. (PI); Lin, M. (PI); Link, M. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Loe, I. (PI); Longhurst, C. (PI); Loutit, C. (PI); Lowe, H. (PI); Lowe, J. (PI); Luna-Fineman, S. (PI); Magnus, D. (PI); Maldonado, Y. (PI); Manning, M. (PI); Marina, N. (PI); Mark, J. (PI); Marsden, A. (PI); McCarty, J. (PI); McGhee, S. (PI); McNamara, N. (PI); Mellins, E. (PI); Mendoza, F. (PI); Milla, C. (PI); Misra, S. (PI); Moss, R. (PI); Murphy, D. (PI); Murphy, J. (PI); Nadeau, K. (PI); Narla, A. (PI); Neely, E. (PI); O'Brodovich, H. (PI); Oghalai, J. (PI); Olson, I. (PI); Pageler, N. (PI); Park, K. (PI); Peng, L. (PI); Penn, A. (PI); Perry, S. (PI); Phibbs, C. (PI); Pico, E. (PI); Pizzo, P. (PI); Porteus, M. (PI); Potter, D. (PI); Prober, C. (PI); Profit, J. (PI); Punn, R. (PI); Rabinovitch, M. (PI); Ragavan, N. (PI); Rangaswami, A. (PI); Reddy, S. (PI); Rhine, W. (PI); Robinson, T. (PI); Rodriguez, E. (PI); Roncarolo, M. (PI); Rosenthal, D. (PI); Roth, S. (PI); Ruiz-Lozano, P. (PI); Sage, J. (PI); Sakamoto, K. (PI); Sandborg, C. (PI); Sanders, L. (PI); Sarwal, M. (PI); Schrijver, I. (PI); Schroeder, A. (PI); Seidel, F. (PI); Shah, A. (PI); Sharek, P. (PI); Shaw, G. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Shepard, E. (PI); Shin, A. (PI); Sibley, E. (PI); Sivakumar, D. (PI); Smith, A. (PI); Song, D. (PI); Sourkes, B. (PI); Spunt, S. (PI); Stevenson, D. (PI); Stirling, J. (PI); Stuart, A. (PI); Sutherland, S. (PI); Sweet-Cordero (PI); Tacy, T. (PI); Tierney, S. (PI); Twist, C. (PI); Van Meurs, K. (PI); Wall, D. (PI); Wang, C. (PI); Weinberg, K. (PI); Willert, J. (PI); Wilson, D. (PI); Wiryawan, B. (PI); Wise, P. (PI); Wong, C. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Wusthoff, C. (PI); Yen, S. (PI); Yuan, N. (PI); Bruce, J. (GP)
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