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EARTHSYS 4: Coevolution of Earth and Life (GS 4)

Earth is the only planet in the universe currently known to harbor life. When and how did Earth become inhabited? How have biological activities altered the planet? How have environmental changes affected the evolution of life? Are we living in a sixth mass extinction? In this course, we will develop and use the tools of geology, paleontology, geochemistry, and modeling that allow us to reconstruct Earth¿s 4.5 billion year history and to reconstruct the interactions between life and its host planet over the past 4 billion years. We will also ask what this long history can tell us about life¿s likely future on Earth. We will also use One half-day field trip.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Payne, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 10: Introduction to Earth Systems

For non-majors and prospective Earth Systems majors. Multidisciplinary approach using the principles of geology, biology, engineering, and economics to describe how the Earth operates as an interconnected, integrated system. Goal is to understand global change on all time scales. Focus is on sciences, technological principles, and sociopolitical approaches applied to solid earth, oceans, water, energy, and food and population. Case studies: environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity, and resource sustainability.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 36N: Life at the Extremes: From the Deep Sea to Deep Space

Preference to freshmen. Microbial life is diverse and resilient on Earth; could it survive elsewhere in our solar system? This seminar will investigate the diversity of microbial life on earth, with an emphasis on extremophiles, and consider the potential for microbial life to exist and persist in extraterrestrial locales. Topics include microbial phylogenetic and physiological diversity, biochemical adaptations of extremophiles, ecology of extreme habitats, and apparent requirements and limits of life. Format includes lectures, discussions, lab-based activities and local field trips. Basics of microbiology, biochemistry, and astrobiology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dekas, A. (PI)

EARTHSYS 41N: The Global Warming Paradox

Preference to freshman. Focus is on the complex climate challenges posed by the substantial benefits of energy consumption, including the critical tension between the enormous global demand for increased human well-being and the negative climate consequences of large-scale emissions of carbon dioxide. Topics include: Earth¿s energy balance; detection and attribution of climate change; the climate response to enhanced greenhouse forcing; impacts of climate change on natural and human systems; and proposed methods for curbing further climate change. Sources include peer-reviewed scientific papers, current research results, and portrayal of scientific findings by the mass media and social networks.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Diffenbaugh, N. (PI)

EARTHSYS 61Q: Food and security (ESS 61Q, INTNLREL 61Q)

The course will provide a broad overview of key policy issues concerning agricultural development and food security, and will assess how global governance is addressing the problem of food security. At the same time the course will provide an overview of the field of international security, and examine how governments and international institutions are beginning to include food in discussions of security.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 95: Liberation Through Land: Organic Gardening and Racial Justice (CSRE 95)

Through field trips, practical work and readings, this course provides students with the tools to begin cultivating a relationship to land that focuses on direct engagement with sustainable gardening, from seed to harvest. The course will take place on the O'Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm, where students will be given the opportunity to learn how to sow seeds, prepare garden beds, amend soils, build compost, and take care of plants. The history of forced farm labor in the U.S., from slavery to low-wage migrant labor, means that many people of color encounter agricultural spaces as sites of trauma and oppression. In this course we will explore the potential for revisiting a narrative of peaceful relation to land and crop that existed long before the trauma occurred, acknowledging the beautiful history of POC coexistence with land. Since this is a practical course, there will be a strong emphasis on participation. Application available at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScdKKp7mtTNzS0-qc-La97LPj9w8SsWNZ5xrAYVjiKTR86F6Q/viewform?usp=sf_link; deadline to apply is September 19, 2017, at midnight. The course is co-sponsored by the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA) and the Earth Systems Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 100: Environmental and Geological Field Studies in the Rocky Mountains (ESS 101)

Three-week, field-based program in the Greater Yellowstone/Teton and Wind River Mountains of Wyoming. Field-based exercises covering topics including: basics of structural geology and petrology; glacial geology; western cordillera geology; paleoclimatology; chemical weathering; aqueous geochemistry; and environmental issues such as acid mine drainage and changing land-use patterns.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chamberlain, P. (PI)

EARTHSYS 103: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, CEE 207A)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 110: Introduction to the foundations of contemporary geophysics (GEOPHYS 110)

Introduction to the foundations of contemporary geophysics. Topics drawn from broad themes in: whole Earth geodynamics, geohazards, natural resources, and enviroment. In each case the focus is on how the interpretation of a variety of geophysical measurements (e.g., gravity, seismology, heat flow, electromagnetics, and remote sensing) can be used to provide fundamental insight into the behavior of the Earth. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MA TH 51, or co-registration in either.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 112: Human Society and Environmental Change (EARTHSYS 212, ESS 112, HISTORY 103D)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 122: Evolution of Marine Ecosystems (BIO 119, GS 123, GS 223B)

Life originally evolved in the ocean. When, why, and how did the major transitions occur in the history of marine life? What triggered the rapid evolution and diversification of animals in the Cambrian, after more than 3.5 billion years of Earth's history? What caused Earth's major mass extinction events? How do ancient extinction events compare to current threats to marine ecosystems? How has the evolution of primary producers impacted animals, and how has animal evolution impacted primary producers? In this course, we will review the latest evidence regarding these major questions in the history of marine ecosystems. We will develop familiarity with the most common groups of marine animal fossils. We will also conduct original analyses of paleontological data, developing skills both in the framing and testing of scientific hypotheses and in data analysis and presentation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Heim, N. (PI); Payne, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 135A: Podcasting the Anthropocene 1.0

The Anthropocene refers to the proposed geologic age defined by the global footprint of humankind. It's an acknowledgement of the tremendous influence people and societies exert on Earth systems. In this course, students research, prepare, and conduct audio interviews related to the Anthropocene with experts of their choosing. Instructors will help facilitate interviews and prepare student for the experience. Throughout the quarter students will participate in group workshops. This is a project-based course resulting in two long-form interviews. The expectation at the end of the quarter is to publish interviews via the Generation Anthropocene podcast, with possible opportunities to cross post in collaboration with external media partners. Students hoping to take EarthSys 135/235 during winter quarter are strongly encouraged to enroll in EarthSys 135A/235A. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 136: The Ethics of Stewardship (EARTHSYS 236)

What responsibilities do humans have to nonhuman nature and future generations? How are human communities and individuals shaped by their relationships with the natural world? What are the social, political, and moral ramifications of drawing sustenance and wealth from natural resources? Whether we realize it or not, we grapple with such questions every time we turn on the tap, fuel up cars, or eat meals -and they are key to addressing issues like global climate change and environmental justice. In this class, we consider several perspectives on this ethical question of stewardship: the role of humans in the global environment. In addition to reading written work and speaking with land stewards, we will practice stewardship at the Stanford Educational Farm. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 139: Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 138, BIO 238, EARTHSYS 239)

This advanced course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins, and then its recent development in natural (especially ecological), economic, psychological, and other social sciences. We will use the ecosystem services framework (characterizing benefits from ecosystems to people) to define the state of knowledge, core methods of analysis, and research frontiers, such as at the interface with biodiversity, resilience, human health, and human development. Intended for diverse students, with a focus on research and real-world cases. To apply, please email the instructor (gdaily@stanford.edu) with a brief description of your background and research interests.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 144: Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS) (ESS 164)

Survey of geographic information including maps, satellite imagery, and census data, approaches to spatial data, and tools for integrating and examining spatially-explicit data. Emphasis is on fundamental concepts of geographic information science and associated technologies. Topics include geographic data structure, cartography, remotely sensed data, statistical analysis of geographic data, spatial analysis, map design, and geographic information system software. Computer lab assignments. All students are required to attend a weekly lab session.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 148: Grow it, Cook it, Eat it. An Experiential Exploration of How and Why We Eat What We Eat

This course provides an introductory exploration of the social, cultural, and economic forces that influence contemporary human diets. Through the combination of interrelated lectures by expert practitioners and hands-on experience planting, tending, harvesting, cooking, and eating food from Stanford's dining hall gardens, students will learn to think critically about modern agricultural practices and the relationship between cuisine and human and ecological health outcomes. Students will also learn and apply basic practices of human-centered design to develop simple frameworks for understanding various eating behaviors in Stanford¿s dining halls and to develop and test hypotheses for how R&DE Stanford Dining might influence eating behaviors to effect better health outcomes for people and the planet. This class, which is offered through the FEED Collaborative in the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, requires an application. For more information about the FEED Collaborative, application procedures and deadlines, and other classes we teach, please visit our website at http://feedcollaborative.org.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 160: Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chan, D. (PI)

EARTHSYS 162: Data for Sustainable Development (CS 325B, EARTHSYS 262)

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) encompass many important aspects of human and ecosystem well-being that are traditionally difficult to measure. This project-based course will focus on ways to use inexpensive, unconventional data streams to measure outcomes relevant to SDGs, including poverty, hunger, health, governance, and economic activity. Students will apply machine learning techniques to various projects outlined at the beginning of the quarter. The main learning goals are to gain experience conducting and communicating original research. Prior knowledge of machine learning techniques, such as from CS 221, CS 229, CS 231N, STATS 202, or STATS 216 is required. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Enrollment limited to 24. Students must apply for the class by filling out the form at https://goo.gl/forms/9LSZF7lPkHadix5D3. A permission code will be given to admitted students to register for the class.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 176: Open Space Management Practicum (EARTHSYS 276)

The unique patchwork of urban-to-rural land uses, property ownership, and ecosystems in our region poses numerous challenges and opportunities for regional conservation and environmental stewardship. Students in this class will address a particular challenge through a faculty-mentored research project engaged with the Peninsula Open Space Trust, Acterra, or the Amah Mutsun Land Trust that focuses on open space management. By focusing on a project driven by the needs of these organizations and carried out through engagement with the community, and with thorough reflection, study, and discussion about the roles of scientific, economic, and policy research in local-scale environmental decision-making, students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research for conservation and open space preservation in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in conservation biology and ecology, community and stakeholder engagement, land use policy and planning, and the practical aspects of land and environmental management.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 182: Designing Educational Gardens (ESS 282)

A project-based course emphasizing 'ways of doing 's sustainable agricultural systems based at the new Stanford Educational Farm. Students will work individually and in small groups on the design of a new educational garden and related programs for the Stanford Educational Farm. The class will meet on 6 Fridays over the course of winter quarter. Class meetings will include an introduction to designing learning gardens and affiliated programs, 3 field trips to exemplary educational gardens in the bay area that will include tours and discussions with garden educators, and work sessions for student projects. By application only.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 187: FEED the Change: Redesigning Food Systems

FEED the Change is a project-based course focused on solving real problems in the food system. Targeted at upper-class undergraduates, this course provides an opportunity for students to meet and work with thought-leading innovators, to gain meaningful field experience, and to develop connections with faculty, students, and others working to create impact in the food system. Students in the course will develop creative confidence by learning and using the basic principles and methodologies of human-centered design, storytelling, and media design. Students will also learn basic tools for working effectively in teams and for analyzing complex social systems. FEED the Change is taught at the d.school and is offered through the FEED Collaborative in the School of Earth. This class requires an application. For application information and more information about our work and about past class projects, please visit our website at http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 191: Concepts in Environmental Communication (EARTHSYS 291)

Introduction to the history, development, and current state of communication of environmental science and policy to non-specialist audiences. Includes fundamental principles, core competencies, and major challenges of effective environmental communication in the public and policy realms and an overview of the current scope of research and practice in environmental communication. Intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, with a background in environmental science and/or policy studies. Prerequisite: Earth Systems core (EarthSys 111 and EarthSys 112) or equivalent. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 210A: Senior Capstone and Reflection

The Earth Systems Senior Capstone and Reflection, required of all seniors, provides students with opportunities to synthesize and reflect on their learning in the major. Students participate in guided career development and planning activities and initiate work on an independent or group capstone project related to an Earth Systems problem or question of interest. In addition, students learn and apply principles of effective oral communication through developing and giving a formal presentation on their internship. Students must also take EARTHSYS 210P, Earth Systems Capstone Project, in the quarter following the Senior Capstone and Reflection Course. Prerequisite: Completion of an approved Earth Systems internship (EARTHSYS 260).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 212: Human Society and Environmental Change (EARTHSYS 112, ESS 112, HISTORY 103D)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 236: The Ethics of Stewardship (EARTHSYS 136)

What responsibilities do humans have to nonhuman nature and future generations? How are human communities and individuals shaped by their relationships with the natural world? What are the social, political, and moral ramifications of drawing sustenance and wealth from natural resources? Whether we realize it or not, we grapple with such questions every time we turn on the tap, fuel up cars, or eat meals -and they are key to addressing issues like global climate change and environmental justice. In this class, we consider several perspectives on this ethical question of stewardship: the role of humans in the global environment. In addition to reading written work and speaking with land stewards, we will practice stewardship at the Stanford Educational Farm. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 239: Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 138, BIO 238, EARTHSYS 139)

This advanced course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins, and then its recent development in natural (especially ecological), economic, psychological, and other social sciences. We will use the ecosystem services framework (characterizing benefits from ecosystems to people) to define the state of knowledge, core methods of analysis, and research frontiers, such as at the interface with biodiversity, resilience, human health, and human development. Intended for diverse students, with a focus on research and real-world cases. To apply, please email the instructor (gdaily@stanford.edu) with a brief description of your background and research interests.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 250: Directed Research

Independent research related to student's primary track, carried out after the junior year, during the summer, and/or during the senior year. Student develops own project with faculty supervision. 10-15 page thesis. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 255: Microbial Physiology (BIO 180, ESS 255, GS 233A)

Introduction to the physiology of microbes including cellular structure, transcription and translation, growth and metabolism, mechanisms for stress resistance and the formation of microbial communities. These topics will be covered in relation to the evolution of early life on Earth, ancient ecosystems, and the interpretation of the rock record. Recommended: introductory biology and chemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Welander, P. (PI)

EARTHSYS 260: Internship

Supervised field, lab, or private sector project. May consist of directed research under the supervision of a Stanford faculty member, participation in one of several off campus Stanford programs, or an approved non-Stanford program relevant to the student's Earth Systems studies. Required of and restricted to declared Earth Systems majors. Includes 15-page technical summary research paper that is subject to iterative revision.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 262: Data for Sustainable Development (CS 325B, EARTHSYS 162)

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) encompass many important aspects of human and ecosystem well-being that are traditionally difficult to measure. This project-based course will focus on ways to use inexpensive, unconventional data streams to measure outcomes relevant to SDGs, including poverty, hunger, health, governance, and economic activity. Students will apply machine learning techniques to various projects outlined at the beginning of the quarter. The main learning goals are to gain experience conducting and communicating original research. Prior knowledge of machine learning techniques, such as from CS 221, CS 229, CS 231N, STATS 202, or STATS 216 is required. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Enrollment limited to 24. Students must apply for the class by filling out the form at https://goo.gl/forms/9LSZF7lPkHadix5D3. A permission code will be given to admitted students to register for the class.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 276: Open Space Management Practicum (EARTHSYS 176)

The unique patchwork of urban-to-rural land uses, property ownership, and ecosystems in our region poses numerous challenges and opportunities for regional conservation and environmental stewardship. Students in this class will address a particular challenge through a faculty-mentored research project engaged with the Peninsula Open Space Trust, Acterra, or the Amah Mutsun Land Trust that focuses on open space management. By focusing on a project driven by the needs of these organizations and carried out through engagement with the community, and with thorough reflection, study, and discussion about the roles of scientific, economic, and policy research in local-scale environmental decision-making, students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research for conservation and open space preservation in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in conservation biology and ecology, community and stakeholder engagement, land use policy and planning, and the practical aspects of land and environmental management.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 291: Concepts in Environmental Communication (EARTHSYS 191)

Introduction to the history, development, and current state of communication of environmental science and policy to non-specialist audiences. Includes fundamental principles, core competencies, and major challenges of effective environmental communication in the public and policy realms and an overview of the current scope of research and practice in environmental communication. Intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, with a background in environmental science and/or policy studies. Prerequisite: Earth Systems core (EarthSys 111 and EarthSys 112) or equivalent. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 292: Multimedia Environmental Communication

Introductory theory and practice of effective, accurate and engaging use of photography and web video production in communicating environmental science and policy concepts to the public. Emphasis on fundamental technique and process more than gear. Includes group project work, instructor and peer critiquing of work, and substantial out-of-class project work. Limited class size, preference to Earth Systems Master's students. No previous photography or video experience necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 293: Environmental Communication Practicum

Students complete an internship or similar practical experience in a professional environmental communication setting. Potential placements include environmental publications, NGOs, government agencies, on-campus entities, and science centers and museums. Restricted to students enrolled in the Environmental Communication Master of Arts in Earth Systems. Can be completed in any quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 294: Environmental Communication Capstone

Project-based course focused on applying the skills and theoretical understanding gained through the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication course progression to a real-world communication challenge. Students design, plan, and implement an integrated communication strategy around a defined environmental topic or research program; a specific research group's laboratory or expedition work; or a topic or concept of interest across research groups, such as climate change adaptation or marine conservation. Restricted to students enrolled in the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program, or by permission of the instructor. May also be completed as an independent project, in consultation with the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Director.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 297: Directed Individual Study in Earth Systems

Under supervision of an Earth Systems faculty member on a subject of mutual interest.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Archie, P. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Arrigo, K. (PI); Asner, G. (PI); Banerjee, B. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Block, B. (PI); Boggs, C. (PI); Boucher, A. (PI); Cain, B. (PI); Caldeira, K. (PI); Caldwell, M. (PI); Casciotti, K. (PI); Chamberlain, P. (PI); Curran, L. (PI); Daily, G. (PI); Davis, J. (PI); Denny, M. (PI); Diffenbaugh, N. (PI); Dirzo, R. (PI); Dunbar, R. (PI); Durham, W. (PI); Egger, A. (PI); Ernst, W. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fendorf, S. (PI); Field, C. (PI); Francis, C. (PI); Frank, Z. (PI); Freyberg, D. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gerritsen, M. (PI); Gilly, W. (PI); Gordon, D. (PI); Gorelick, S. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Hadly, E. (PI); Hawk, S. (PI); Hayden, T. (PI); Hecker, S. (PI); Hilley, G. (PI); Hoagland, S. (PI); Ihme, M. (PI); Ingle, J. (PI); Jackson, R. (PI); Jacobson, M. (PI); Jamieson, A. (PI); Jones, J. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kennedy, J. (PI); Knight, R. (PI); Koseff, J. (PI); Kovscek, A. (PI); Lambin, E. (PI); Lawrence, K. (PI); Litvak, L. (PI); Lobell, D. (PI); Long, S. (PI); Lutomski, P. (PI); Lynham, J. (PI); Lyons, E. (PI); Masters, G. (PI); Matson, P. (PI); Micheli, F. (PI); Monismith, S. (PI); Mooney, H. (PI); Mormann, F. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nelson, J. (PI); Nevle, R. (PI); Novy-Hildesley, J. (PI); Orr, F. (PI); Ortolano, L. (PI); Osborne, M. (PI); Palumbi, S. (PI); Payne, J. (PI); Phillips, K. (PI); Polk, E. (PI); Rajaratnam, B. (PI); Root, T. (PI); Rothe, M. (PI); Saltzman, J. (PI); Schneider, S. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Seto, K. (PI); Shiv, B. (PI); Simon, G. (PI); Somero, G. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Switzer, P. (PI); Tabazadeh, A. (PI); Thomas, L. (PI); Thompson, B. (PI); Truebe, S. (PI); Victor, D. (PI); Vitousek, P. (PI); Walbot, V. (PI); Watanabe, J. (PI); Weyant, J. (PI); Wiederkehr, S. (PI); Wight, G. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Woodward, J. (PI); Zoback, M. (PI)
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