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EDUC 30N: The Science of Diverse Communities (CSRE 30N, PSYCH 30N, SOC 179N)

This course is an exploration. Most generally, its aim is to identify distinguishing features of good diverse communities and articulate them well enough to offer principles or guidelines for how to design and manage such communities¿all with a particular focus on educational communities like schools, universities, academic disciplines, etc., but with the hope that such principles might generalize to other kinds of organizations and the broader society. The readings range from those on the origins of human communities and social identities to those on intergroup trust building. They also aim to embed our discussions in the major ¿diversity¿ issues of the day¿for example, what¿s in the news about campus life. nnThus the course has a practical purpose: to develop testable ideas for improving the comfort level, fairness and goodness-for-all of ¿identity¿ diverse communities--especially in educational settings. nnThe course also has a basic science purpose: to explore the psychological significance of community. Is there a psychological need for community? Is there something about a need for community that can¿t be reduced to other needs¿for example, for a gender, racial or sexual-orientation identity? How strong is the need for community¿against other needs? What kinds of human grouping¿s can satisfy it? In meeting this need, can membership in one community substitute for membership in others? What do people need from communities in order to thrive in them? Do strong diverse communities dampen intergroup biases? Can strong community loyalty mitigate identity tensions within communities? And so on. nnSuch questions, the hope is, will help us develop a more systematic understanding of the challenges and opportunities inherent in diverse human communities
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Steele, C. (PI)

EDUC 98: Service Learning Practicum

For Alternative Spring Break program leaders. The skills and philosophical framework to develop and lead an ASB experience. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; McConnell, J. (PI)

EDUC 100A: EAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education

Education and Society Theme (EAST) House seminar. In autumn quarter, faculty and other scholars from around the University discuss the latest issues, debates, and research in the field of Education. In winter quarter, research and practice pertaining to sex, gender, and education are presented by professionals and scholars. In the spring, the seminar provides an inquiry into the culture at Stanford and one's personal values. Through an examination of these topics, students are able to share and develop their varied interests in educational research, policy, and practice. Notes: Attendance at first class required. Seminar meets in the EAST House Dining Hall located at 554 Governor's Ave. The seminar is open to all students at Stanford with first-priority given to pre-assign residents of EAST House followed by other residents of EAST and all other undergraduates. Graduate students are allowed to enroll on a space-available basis. Visitors/auditors are not allowed. The seminar is required for all pre-assigned residents of EAST House and is repeatable for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 101: Introduction to Teaching and Learning

This course is designed to help undergraduates explore career interests in education; it is the core course for the Undergraduate Minor in Education, and fulfills requirements for Honors in Education. The course considers the philosophy, history, politics, professional practice and social structures of teaching in the United States. Students will read and discuss teaching theory and research, participate in learning activities and visit school teaching sites, as well as examine and analyze artifacts and models of teaching.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 103A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 203A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scott, R. (PI)

EDUC 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 105: How to learn Mathematics - New ideas from the science of learning (CME 10)

This course will help provide the transition from high school to college learning and encourage the positive ideas and mindsets that shape productive learning. We willnconsider what learning theories have to tell us about mathematics learning, the nature of good teaching and the reasons for ongoing inequities in mathematics learning and participation. This seminar is for those who would like a more positive relationship with mathematics, and are interested in learning about ways to tackle education inequalities. Learning goals: First, it introduces students to theories of learning and in particular the learning of mathematics. Mathematics plays a key role in many students¿ learning identities and is often the cause of low self-esteem and anxiety. Research tells us that this is because mathematics in the US is taught in highly ineffective ways. Indeed there is a large gap between what we know works from research and what happens in most mathematics classrooms. This seminar will give participants an understanding of ways to relate positively to mathematics, to learn mathematics most productively and some of the learning barriers that often deny students the opportunity to engage with mathematics in productive ways.nSecond, the course will teach students about the inequalities that pervade the education system in the United States. We will examine the barriers to the participation of women and students of color and we will consider why social class and race are both strong predictors of mathematics achievement. It is hoped that students will leave the course with greater knowledge of why mathematics is important - to themselves and to the future of society.nCourse participants will be given the opportunity to take part in a mathematics camp, designed to change the pathways of middle school students, similar to this previous camp: https://www.youcubed.org/solving-math- problem/ and to take part in the work of youcubed.org. if they wish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Boaler, J. (PI)

EDUC 117: Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access (EDUC 417)

The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 118S: Designing Your Stanford (ME 104S)

DYS uses a Design Thinking approach to help Freshmen and Sophomores learn practical tools and ideas to make the most of their Stanford experience. Topics include the purpose of college, major selection, educational wayfinding, and innovating college outcomes - all applied through an introduction to Design Thinking. This seminar class incorporates small group discussion, in-class activities, field exercises, personal reflection, and individual coaching. Admission to be confirmed by email to Axess registered students prior to first class session. DYS uses a Design Thinking approach to help Freshmen and Sophomores learn practical tools and ideas to make the most of their Stanford experience. Topics include the purpose of college, major selection, educational wayfinding, and innovating college outcomes - all applied through an introduction to design mindsets and practices. This seminar class incorporates small group discussion, in-class activities, field exercises, personal reflection, and individual coaching. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourstanford.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 123: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (AFRICAAM 130, CSRE 130, EDUC 322)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

EDUC 139: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 239, ME 139, ME 231)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goldman, S. (PI)

EDUC 148: Critical Perspectives on Teaching and Tutoring English Language Learners

Theoretical foundation for volunteer tutors of English language learners in urban environments working with children in school-based programs or adults in community-based settings.May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 149: Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism (EDUC 249)

Sociolinguistic perspective. Emphasis is on typologies of bilingualism, the acquisition of bilingual ability, description and measurement, and the nature of societal bilingualism. Prepares students to work with bilingual students and their families and to carry out research in bilingual settings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 151: The Future of Information (STS 151)

As information has a fascinating history (see HISTORY 5A), so it possesses a promising if concerning future. Through lecture, demonstration, and in-class web-work, this course will provide students with advanced strategies in (a) identifying sources and tools for advancing the quest for information; (b) assessing elements of trust, authority, and chicanery in the provision of information; (c) recognizing the economic and legal structures shaping information sources, services, and rights; and (d) discovering who is behind what information. With a focus on the info-worlds of journalism, learning, governance, students will acquire and practice the forensic skills and web savvy of fact-checkers and investigative reporters, activists and scholars. Here¿s a class set to determine the future course of information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 171: Preschool Counts: Engaging Young Children in Math

Restricted to students who participate in a service learning program focused on early math learning. Training for activities in preschool classrooms. Focus is on the teaching of math to young children, but also includes background on issues related to young children's cognitive, language, and social development; classroom management; cultural diversity; and early childhood education programs. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 177A: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177A, CSRE 177E, HUMBIO 29A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Padilla, A. (PI)

EDUC 180: Directed Reading in Education

For undergraduates and master's degree students. (All Areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Adams, C. (PI); Alim, H. (PI); Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Banks, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bayati, M. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Boaler, J. (PI); Bonnet, G. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Borko, H. (PI); Brazer, S. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bromley, P. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Carter, P. (PI); Cohen, G. (PI); Cotterman, K. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Dee, T. (PI); Domingue, B. (PI); Ehrlich, T. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Emery, D. (PI); Fogg, B. (PI); Fong, B. (PI); Forssell, K. (PI); Garcia, A. (PI); Goldenberg, C. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Hoagland, G. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Katz-Lindquist, S. (PI); Kelman, A. (PI); Kijima, R. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Koski, W. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); Kuboyama, E. (PI); Kushner, M. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Langer-Osuna, J. (PI); Lee, G. (PI); Leslie, M. (PI); Levine, S. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Loyalka, P. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); Martinez, A. (PI); Martinez, R. (PI); McCandliss, B. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Mendoza-Newman, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nandagopal, K. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); O'Hara, S. (PI); Obradovic, J. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Osborne, J. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Perez-Granados, D. (PI); Peterson, M. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Reich, R. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rohlen, T. (PI); Rosa, J. (PI); Roth, B. (PI); Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Scott, R. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Smith, S. (PI); Solano-Flores, G. (PI); Sorcar, P. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stevens, M. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thille, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Williamson, P. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wise, B. (PI); Wise, S. (PI); Wolf, J. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); Yisrael, D. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 185: Master's Thesis

(all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 190: Directed Research in Education

For undergraduates and master's students. May be repeated for credit. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alim, H. (PI); Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Banks, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Boaler, J. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Borko, H. (PI); Brazer, S. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bromley, P. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Carter, P. (PI); Cohen, G. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Dee, T. (PI); Domingue, B. (PI); Ehrlich, T. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Emery, D. (PI); Fogg, B. (PI); Fong, B. (PI); Forssell, K. (PI); Garcia, A. (PI); Goldenberg, C. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Kijima, R. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); Kuboyama, E. (PI); Kushner, M. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Langer-Osuna, J. (PI); Levine, S. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Loyalka, P. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); Martinez, R. (PI); McCandliss, B. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); Nass, C. (PI); O'Hara, S. (PI); Obradovic, J. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Osborne, J. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rohlen, T. (PI); Rosa, J. (PI); Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Scott, R. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Solano-Flores, G. (PI); Sorcar, P. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stevens, M. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thille, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Williamson, P. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wolf, J. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 192E: Interpersonal Learning and Leadership: Fraternity and Sorority life

This class will engage fraternity and sorority leadership in a meaningful discussion around the purpose and relevancy of the college fraternity and sorority. Participants will engage in coursework intended to build skills relevant to being a peer elected leader within their chapter. Specifically, students will research, discuss, and present on current trends impacting the contemporary fraternity and sorority community. Students will also practice self-reflection, decision-making, facilitating difficult conversations, and group leadership. Participants will gain a basic understanding of the challenges within the fraternity and sorority community and gain the skills necessary to analyze and approach these challenges successfully. As an outcome of this course, students will be able to look critically at Greek-letter organizations and their respective communities and will become better skilled as leaders to address problems and effect change as necessary.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 193A: Listen Up! Core Peer Counseling Skills

Topics: verbal and non-verbal skills, open and closed questions, paraphrasing, working with feelings, summarization, and integration. Individual training, group exercises, role play practice with optional video feedback. Sections on relevance to crisis counseling and student life. Guest speakers from University and community agencies. Students develop and apply skills in University settings. Sections will be assigned during the first week of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 193P: Peer Counseling at the Bridge

Mental health issues such as relationships, substance abuse, sexual assault, depression, eating disorders, academic stressors, suicide, and grief and bereavement. Guest speakers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 193S: Peer Counseling on Comprehensive Sexual Health

Information on sexually transmitted infections and diseases, and birth control methods. Topics related to sexual health such as communication, societal attitudes and pressures, pregnancy, abortion, and the range of sexual expression. Role-play and peer-education outreach projects. Required for those wishing to counsel at the Sexual Health Peer Resource Center (SHPRC).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yisrael, D. (PI)

EDUC 199A: Undergraduate Honors Seminar

Required of juniors and seniors in the honors program in the School of Education. Student involvement and apprenticeships in educational research. Participants share ongoing work on their honors thesis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit once.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 200A: Introduction to Data Analysis and Interpretation

Primarily for master's students in the School of Education. Focus is on reading literature and interpreting descriptive and inferential statistics, especially those commonly found in education. Topics: basic research design, instrument reliability and validity, descriptive statistics, correlation, t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, and simple and multiple regression. All offerings of this course (whether meeting on Mon & Weds or Tues & Thurs) will be taught identically.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 200B: Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods

(Formerly EDUC 151.) Primarily for master's students: An introduction to the core concepts and methods of qualitative research. Through a variety of hands-on learning activities, readings, field experiences, class lectures, and discussions, students will explore the processes and products of qualitative inquiry.nnThis is a graduate level course. No undergraduates may enroll. Priority will be given to GSE students, and final enrollment depends on instructor approval after the first day of class.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pope, D. (PI); Wolf, J. (PI)

EDUC 202: Introduction to Comparative and International Education

Contemporary theoretical debates about educational change and development, and the international dimension of issues in education. Emphasis is on the development of students' abilities to make cross-national and historical comparisons of educational phenomena.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 203A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 103A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scott, R. (PI)

EDUC 204: Introduction to Philosophy of Education (PHIL 231)

How to think philosophically about educational problems. Recent influential scholarship in philosophy of education. No previous study in philosophy required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Callan, E. (PI)

EDUC 206A: Applied Research Methods in International and Comparative Education I: Introduction

Required for M.A. students in ICE and IEPA. Orientation to the M.A. program and research project; exploration of resources for study and research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 209A: Policy, Organization, and Leadership Studies Seminar

This is a required course for all POLS students. The goals of the POLS Seminar (EDUC 209ABC) are to assist students in making the most of their Stanford graduate experience across several dimensions (academic, professional, and social). EDUC 209A is focused on orienting students to the academic and extra-curricular aspects of the experience as quickly as possible, while helping them coalesce as a group and learn how to leverage each other's professional knowledge. Another goals is to help student define their graduate degree goals, so they can plan their year in a very intentional manner that will result in a project or experiences they can highlight during the required Spring quarter POLS Project Forum.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brazer, S. (PI)

EDUC 210: Policy, Organization, and Leadership Studies Internship Workshop

Forum for POLS students to link their academic learning to real world experience through in-class discussions, presentations, and reflective writing. Fall Quarter is focused on understanding the intern's role within the larger organization. Winter Quarter is outward looking with a focus on understanding the broader fields the students' organizations reside within. Spring Quarter focus is on students learning from and being prepared to teach others.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 213: Introduction to Teaching

Key concepts in teaching and learning; teacher content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge; student prior knowledge and preconceptions; cognition and metacognition; classroom culture, motivation, and management; teaching diverse populations; comparison of teaching models; analysis of teaching; standards, accountability, and assessment of learning; assessing teaching quality; online learning and teaching.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wischnia, S. (PI)

EDUC 215: LDT Internship Workshop

The required internship is a cornerstone of the LDT program. This course will provide students an opportunity to link their academic learning to real world experience through in-class discussions, presentations, and reflective writing. It will allow the program director to monitor the quality of the experience and provide timely advice and support as needed for an optimal learning experience.nnThe course will meet several times each quarter, adjacent to LDT seminar (Fridays, 12-1). An internship agreement will be required at the beginning of the course signed by the faculty advisor), as well as a reflection paper at the end of the course. Students will take the course for 1 unit, unless they request additional units for unpaid internship hours.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 217: Free Speech, Academic Freedom, and Democracy (ETHICSOC 217X, PHIL 278C)

The course examines connected ideas of free speech, academic freedom, and democratic legitimacy that are still widely shared by many of us but have been subject to skeptical pressures both outside and inside the academy in recent years. The course explores the principled basis of these ideas, how well they might (or might not) be defended against skeptical challenge, and how they might be applied in particular controversies about the rights of students, instructors, and researchers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Callan, E. (PI)

EDUC 220D: History of School Reform: Origins, Policies, Outcomes, and Explanations (HISTORY 258E)

Strongly recommended for students in the POLS M.A. program; others welcome. Focus is on 20th-century U.S. Intended and unintended patterns in school change; the paradox of reform that schools are often reforming but never seem to change much; rhetorics of reform and factors that inhibit change. Case studies emphasize the American high school. This course is strongly recommended for POLS students pursuing K -12 leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 228F: Becoming Literate in School II

Second in a three-course required sequence of reading and language arts theory and methodology for candidates in the STEP Elementary program. Theories for guiding instruction and curricular choices.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Johnson, E. (PI)

EDUC 229A: Learning Design and Technology Seminar

Four-quarter required seminar for the LDT master's program. Discussions and activities related to designing for learning with technology. Support for internships and Master's project. Theoretical and practical perspectives, hands-on development, and collaborative efforts. (LDT)
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 232: Culture, Learning, and Poverty

This course examines the categories and methods used to analyze and explain educational inequalities in the United States from 1950 to present. Approaches to theories of school failure and methods of intervention are distinguished by their ideas on the play of learning, language, cognition, culture, and social class in human development. Particular attention is given to the Culture of Poverty controversies of the 1960s and their recent emergence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 239: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 139, ME 139, ME 231)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goldman, S. (PI)

EDUC 240: Adolescent Development and Learning

How do adolescents develop their identities, manage their inner and outer worlds, and learn? Presuppositions: that fruitful instruction takes into account the developmental characteristics of learners and the task demands of specific curricula; and that teachers can promote learning and motivation by mediating among the characteristics of students, the curriculum, and the wider social context of the classroom. Prerequisite: STEP student or consent of instructor. (STEP)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 242: Workshop on Instrument Development for Assessment, Research or Evaluation Purposes I

This course is designed with the belief that collecting information is a routine activity in which most researchers and educators are involved. Developing and improving instruments to gather information for descriptive, assessment, research, or evaluation purposes is a goal that unites all social sciences. Therefore, this course focuses on the technical skills required to develop, judge, and/or select quality instruments in diverse domains. The course will focus on your personal journey to develop or judge an instrument on something that is important for you.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI)

EDUC 244: Classroom Management and Leadership

Student and teacher roles in developing a classroom community. Strategies for classroom management within a theoretical framework. STEP secondary only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 244F: Elementary Classroom Leadership and Management

Skills for developing a positive classroom learning environment. Theoretical issues and opportunities to acquire strategies and make links with practice teaching class. STEP elementary only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rose, D. (PI)

EDUC 246B: Secondary Teaching Seminar

Preparation and practice in issues and strategies for teaching in classrooms with diverse students. Topics: guided observations, building classroom community, classroom interaction processes, topics in special education portfolio development, teacher professionalism, patterns of school organization, teaching contexts, and government educational policy. Classroom observation and student teaching with accompanying seminars during each quarter of STEP year. 16 units required for completion of the program. Prerequisite: STEP student.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 246F: Elementary Teaching Seminar

Integrating theory and practice in teacher development. Topics include: equity, democracy, and social justice in the context of teaching and learning; teacher reflection, inquiry, and research; parent/teacher relationships; youth development and community engagement; professional growth and development; teacher leadership and school change processes; preparation for the job search, the STEP Elementary Portfolio, and the STEP Elementary Conference. Prerequisite: STEP student.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-6 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lit, I. (PI)

EDUC 249: Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism (EDUC 149)

Sociolinguistic perspective. Emphasis is on typologies of bilingualism, the acquisition of bilingual ability, description and measurement, and the nature of societal bilingualism. Prepares students to work with bilingual students and their families and to carry out research in bilingual settings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 256: Psychological and Educational Resilience Among Children and Youth (HUMBIO 149)

Theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues pertaining to the psychological and educational resilience of children and adolescents. Overview of the resilience framework, including current terminology and conceptual and measurement issues. Adaptive systems that enable some children to achieve successful adaptation despite high levels of adversity exposure. How resilience can be studied across multiple levels of analysis, ranging from cell to society. Individual, family, school, and community risk and protective factors that influence children's development and adaptation. Intervention programs designed to foster resilient adaptation in disadvantaged children's populations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 262B: Curriculum and Instruction in English

Approaches to teaching English in the secondary school, including goals for instruction, teaching techniques, and methods of evaluation. STEP secondary only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Levine, S. (PI)

EDUC 263B: Curriculum and Instruction in Mathematics

The purposes and programs of mathematics in the secondary curriculum; teaching materials, methods. Prerequisite: STEP student or consent of instructor. (STEP) 263A. Sum, 263B. Aut, 263C. Win
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Boaler, J. (PI)

EDUC 263F: Quantitative Reasoning in Mathematics II

Second of a three-course sequence in mathematics for STEP elementary teacher candidates. Content, pedagogy, and context. Mathematics subject matter; the orchestration of teaching and learning of elementary mathematics including curriculum, classroom and lesson design, and cases studies. Sociocultural and linguistic diversity, equity, differentiation of instruction, the impact of state and national standards, and home/community connections.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Langer-Osuna, J. (PI)

EDUC 264B: Curriculum and Instruction in World Languages

Approaches to teaching foreign languages in the secondary school, including goals for instruction, teaching techniques, and methods of evaluation. STEP secondary only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chan, H. (PI); Silva, M. (PI)

EDUC 264E: Methods and Materials in Bilingual Classrooms

Restricted to STEP elementary teacher candidates in the BCLAD program. Theories, research, and methods related to instruction of Spanish-English bilingual children, grades K-8. Approaches to dual language instruction, and pedagogical and curricular strategies for the instruction of reading, language arts, science, history, social science, and math in Spanish. Assessment issues and practices with bilingual students. In Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rivas, C. (PI)

EDUC 266: Educational Neuroscience

An introduction to the growing intersection between education research and emerging research on functional brain development. Students will probe the contributions and limitations of emerging theoretical and empirical contribution of neuroscience approaches to specific academic skills such as reading and mathematics, as well as exposure to general processes crucial for educational success, including motivation, attention, and social cognition. Final projects will explore these themes in the service of interventions designed to improve how these functions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McCandliss, B. (PI)

EDUC 267B: Curriculum and Instruction in Science

Possible objectives of secondary science teaching and related methods: selection and organization of content and instructional materials; lab and demonstration techniques; evaluation, tests; curricular changes; ties with other subject areas. Prerequisite: STEP student or consent of instructor. (STEP)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Osborne, J. (PI)

EDUC 267E: Development of Scientific Reasoning and Knowledge

For STEP elementary teacher candidates. Theories and methods of teaching and learning science. How to develop curricula and criteria for critiquing curricula. Students design a science curriculum plan for a real setting. State and national science frameworks and content standards. Alternative teaching approaches; how to select approaches that are compatible with learner experience and lesson objectives. Focus is on the linguistic and cultural diversity of California public school students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Diffenbaugh, P. (PI)

EDUC 268B: Curriculum and Instruction in History and Social Science

The methodology of history instruction: teaching for historical thinking and reasoning; linking the goals of teaching history with literacy; curriculum trends; and opportunities to develop teaching and resource units. Prerequisite: STEP student.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Cupp, B. (PI)

EDUC 269: The Ethics in Teaching

Goal is to prepare for the ethical problems teachers confront in their professional lives. Skills of ethical reasoning, familiarity with ethical concepts, and how to apply these skills and concepts in the analysis of case studies. Topics: ethical responsibility in teaching, freedom of speech and academic freedom, equality and difference, indoctrination, and the teaching of values.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Callan, E. (PI)

EDUC 275: Leading U.S. Schools

The landscape of schooling in the U.S. is dynamic and replete with ideologies, myths, and beliefs. Organizational theory, leadership theory, and empirical research are lenses through which students will develop a deeper and broader understanding of the similarities and differences among private schools, parochial schools, traditional K ¿ 12 schools, charter schools, and alternative schools. Students will connect theory and research to practice by visiting and learning about two or more schools of their choosing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 281: Technology for Learners

How can we use technology to improve learning? Many hope that technology will make learning easier, faster, or accessible to more learners. This course explores a variety of approaches to designing tools for learning, the theories behind them, and the research that tests their effectiveness. Strong focus on evaluating and designing new tools for specific learners and subjects. Space is limited. Priority is given to master's students in the LDT Master's Program. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 283: Child Development In and Beyond Schools

(Formerly EDUC 144). How schools form a context for children's social and cognitive development. Focus is on early and middle childhood. Transactional processes between children and learning opportunities in classroom contexts. Topics include: alternative theoretical perspectives on the nature of child development; early experience and fit with traditional school contexts; assessment practices and implications for developing identities as learners; psychological conceptions of motivational processes and alternative perspectives; the role of peer relationships in schools; and new designs for learning environments. Readings address social science and methodological issues. STEP Elementary only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 284A: Designing Equitable Groupwork

Teaching in academically and linguistically heterogeneous classrooms requires a repertoire of pedagogical strategies. Focus is on how to provide access to intellectually challenging curriculum and equal-status interaction for students in diverse classrooms. Emphasis is on group work and its cognitive, social, and linguistic benefits for students. How to prepare for group work, equalize participation, and design learning tasks that support conceptual understanding, mastery of content and language growth. How to assess group products and individual contributions. (STEP)
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 291: Learning Sciences and Technology Design Research Seminar and Colloquium

Students and faculty present and critique new and original research relevant to the Learning Sciences and Technology Design doctoral program. Goal is to develop a community of scholars who become familiar with each other's work. Practice of the arts of presentation and scholarly dialogue while introducing seminal issues and fundamental works in the field.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 299: Equity and Schooling

(Formerly EDUC 167.) Introduction to the theories and practices of equity and democracy in education. How to think about teaching and schooling in new ways; the individual moral and political reasons for becoming a teacher. (STEP)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 306A: Economics of Education in the Global Economy

Case material considers development problems in the U.S. and abroad. Discussion sections on economic aspects of educational development.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 306Y: Economic Support Seminar for Education and Economic Development

Core economic concepts that address issues in education in developing and developed countries. Supply and demand, elasticity, discount rates, rate of return analysis, utility functions, and production functions. Corequisite: 306A. (Carnoy)
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; John, J. (TA); Perez, G. (TA)

EDUC 311: Research Workshop in International Education

International Education Initiative (IEI) ¿ a cross-campus initiative to promote greater collaboration around research in international education at Stanford. It is designed to help students conduct higher quality research in international education and gain wide exposure to the international education research community. Students will have the chance to engage with invited speakers from outside Stanford, present and get feedback about their own research, and learn new methodological tools.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Loyalka, P. (PI)

EDUC 313: The Education of American Jews (JEWISHST 393X, RELIGST 313X)

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the question of how American Jews negotiate the desire to retain a unique ethnic sensibility without excluding themselves from American culture more broadly. Students will examine the various ways in which people debate, deliberate, and determine what it means to be an "American Jew". This includes an investigation of how American Jewish relationships to formal and informal educational encounters through school, popular culture, religious ritual, and politics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kelman, A. (PI)

EDUC 314: Technologies, Social Justice and Black Vernacular Culture

From texts to techne, from artifacts to discourses on science and technology, this course is an examination of how Black people in this society have engaged with the mutually consitutive relationships that endure between humans and technologies. We will focus on these engagements in vernacular cultural spaces, from storytelling traditions to music and move to ways academic and aesthetic movements have imagined these relationships. Finally, we will consider the implications for work with technologies in both school and community contexts for work in the pursuit of social and racial justice. Course is open to master's and doctoral students only.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Banks, A. (PI)

EDUC 322: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (AFRICAAM 130, CSRE 130, EDUC 123)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

EDUC 325A: Proseminar 1

Required of and limited to first-year Education doctoral students. Core questions in education: what is taught, to whom, and why; how do people learn; how do teachers teach and how do they learn to teach; how are schools organized; how are educational systems organized; and what are the roles of education in society?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 333A: Understanding Learning Environments

Advanced seminar. Theoretical approaches to learning used to analyze learning environments and develop goals for designing resources and activities to support effective learning practices.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 337: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 339: Advanced Topics in Quantitative Policy Analysis

For doctoral students. How to develop a researchable question and research design, identify data sources, construct conceptual frameworks, and interpret empirical results. Presentation by student participants and scholars in the field. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 343A: Navigating the Academic Profession

For DARE doctoral fellows only. The roles and responsibilities of faculty members in American colleges and universities in the 21st century. How to become productive faculty members within the higher education enterprise.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Golde, C. (PI)

EDUC 350: Workshop on New Research

This course will integrate attendance and participation at the research lectures given by visitors with separate, faculty-led workshops that discuss the presented study, its methodologies, and the research and policy contexts in which it is situated. This workshop will also provide an opportunity for professional development relevant to academic publishing and effective presentation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reininger, M. (PI)

EDUC 351A: Statistical Methods for Longitudinal Research (STATS 222)

See http://rogosateaching.com/stat222/. Research designs and statistical procedures for time-ordered (repeated-measures) data. The analysis of longitudinal panel data is central to empirical research on learning, development, aging, and the effects of interventions. Topics include: measurement of change, growth curve models, analysis of durations including survival analysis, experimental and non-experimental group comparisons, reciprocal effects, stability. Prerequisite: intermediate statistical methods
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rogosa, D. (PI)

EDUC 355: Higher Education and Society

For undergraduates and graduate students interested in what colleges and universities do, and what society expects of them. The relationship between higher education and society in the U.S. from a sociological perspective. The nature of reform and conflict in colleges and universities, and tensions in the design of higher education systems and organizations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stevens, M. (PI)

EDUC 359C: Science Literacy

The changing debate over conceptions of the nature of science and the calls to broaden it. Themes, directions, limitations, and epistemological foundations of the body of research on the nature of science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brown, B. (PI)

EDUC 359F: Research in Mathematics Education: Conducting Inquiry

This seminar will serve as both a workshop for developing participants' own professional trajectories as mathematics education scholars and a forum for discussion on key issues related to conducting research and making an impact in the field of mathematics education. Participants will be invited to share their own research and to engage in discussions about possible impact. This seminar is restricted to mathematics education students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Langer-Osuna, J. (PI)

EDUC 361: Workshop: Networks and Organizations (SOC 361W)

For students doing advanced research. Group comments and criticism on dissertation projects at any phase of completion, including data problems, empirical and theoretical challenges, presentation refinement, and job market presentations. Collaboration, debate, and shaping research ideas. Prerequisite: courses in organizational theory or social network analysis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

EDUC 367: Cultural Psychology

(Formerly 292.) The relationship between culture and psychological processes; how culture becomes an integral part of cognitive, social, and moral development. Both historical and contemporary treatments of cultural psychology, including deficit models, crosscultural psychology, ecological niches, culturally specific versus universal development, sociocultural frameworks, and minority child development. The role of race and power in research on cultural psychology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 370: Parenting and Family Relationships in Childhood

This course will focus on the relevance of parenting and family relationships for children's development. We will examine studies of: (1) how parental and child behaviors contribute to sensitivity, responsiveness, scaffolding, autonomy, and control within the dyad; (2) parents role in socializing children¿s emotions and their ethnic/racial identity; and (3) parents involvement in early education. We will discuss cultural and economic factors affecting our conceptualization, measurement, and interpretations of parents' behaviors and their interactions with their children.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Obradovic, J. (PI)

EDUC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (POLISCI 334, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law (LAW 781), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 375A: Seminar on Organizational Theory (MS&E 389, SOC 363A)

The social science literature on organizations assessed through consideration of the major theoretical traditions and lines of research predominant in the field.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

EDUC 376: Higher Education Leadership Colloquium

This course presents a series of speakers from Stanford and other higher education institutions who work at the middle to higher levels of administration. Speakers and topics are guided by student interest, but include a range from student affairs to finance. Sessions are intended to be interactive.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stevens, M. (PI)

EDUC 377C: Philanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change

Appropriate for any student driven to effect positive social change from either the for-profit or nonprofit sector, Philanthropy will challenge students to expand their own strategic thinking about philanthropic aspiration and action. In recent decades, philanthropy has become an industry in itself - amounting to over $358 billion in the year 2014. Additionally, the last decade has seen unprecedented innovation in both philanthropy and social value creation. This course explores the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations and corporate foundations; and innovative models, including funding intermediaries, open-source platforms, technology-driven philanthropies, impact investing and venture philanthropy. Course work will include readings and case discussions that encourage students to analyze both domestic and global philanthropic strategies as they relate to foundation mission, grantmaking, evaluation, financial management, infrastructure, knowledge management, policy change and board governance. Guest speakers will consist of high profile philanthropists, foundation presidents, social entrepreneurs and Silicon Valley business leaders creating new philanthropic models. The course will also provide students with real-world grantmaking experience in completing nonprofit organizational assessments and making grants to organizations totaling $20,000.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 380: Supervised Internship

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alim, H. (PI); Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Atkin, J. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Borko, H. (PI); Brazer, S. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bridges, E. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Brown, N. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Carter, P. (PI); Cohen, G. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Dee, T. (PI); Ehrlich, T. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Fogg, B. (PI); Forssell, K. (PI); Gage, N. (PI); Goldenberg, C. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Greeno, J. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Heath, S. (PI); Hoagland, G. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Kelman, A. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Koski, W. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Levin, H. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); March, J. (PI); Martinez, A. (PI); Massy, W. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Mendoza-Newman, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); Noddings, N. (PI); O'Hara, S. (PI); Obradovic, J. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Osborne, J. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Reich, R. (PI); Rickford, J. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rohlen, T. (PI); Salinas, N. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Shulman, L. (PI); Simms, W. (PI); Spindler, G. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stevens, M. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Stout, F. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thoresen, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Weiler, H. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 387: Workshop: Comparative Studies of Educational and Political Systems (SOC 311A)

Analysis of quantitative and longitudinal data on national educational systems and political structures. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 388F: Introduction to Academic Language

This course will provide opportunities for pre-service teachers to begin to develop an understanding of language uses, forms, and mechanics through application of a functional approach to academic language. By exploring language structures (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) as well as lanauge-in-use (pragmatics and discourse), teacher candidates will be able to better recognize linguistic demands and challenges of students in the classroom.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hill-Bonnet, L. (PI)

EDUC 400A: Introduction to Statistical Methods in Education

(Formerly EDUC 160.) Basic techniques in descriptive and inferential statistics for educational research will be covered with an emphasis on rigorous preparation for intermediate and advanced courses. Topics include central tendency, variance, probability, distributions, confidence interval, t-test, F-test, correlation, regression, and analysis of variance. Non-parametric statistics and graphical principles for data representation will also be addressed. Students will also be introduced to STATA in preparation for subsequent higher level courses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schwartz, D. (PI)

EDUC 401A: Mini Courses in Methodology: Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (SPSS)

Statistical analysis using SPSS, including generating descriptive statistics, drawing graphs, calculating correlation coefficients, conducting t-tests, analysis of variance, and linear regression. Building up datasets, preparing datasets for analysis, conducting statistical analysis, and interpreting results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stenhaug, B. (PI)

EDUC 401B: Mini Courses in Methodology: Stata

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the Stata statistical software package for use in quantitative research. By the end of the course, students should be able to import and export data, clean and manage data, conduct standard statistical tests (e.g., correlation, t-test, regression), and produce a graph.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stenhaug, B. (PI)

EDUC 404: Topics in Brazilian Education: Public Policy and Innovation for the 21st Century

The objective of this seminar is to provide students from different backgrounds an opportunity to learn about current issues and debates on Brazilian education. The seminar will cover topics on the history of Brazilian education; an overview of current school reforms at the federal level; educational assessments; education and economic growth; educational equity; teacher labor market; technology and education; early childhood; and higher education to Brazil.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 412: Workshop in Religion and Education (RELIGST 333X)

This 1-unit workshop will explore the intersection of religion and education across a variety of learning environments and demographics. It invites an ongoing conversation of the relationships between schools, congregations, religious bodies, learners, seekers, philanthropy, and public education. Advanced students and visiting scholars will have an opportunity to present their work for discussion. May be repeat for credit
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 417: Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access (EDUC 117)

The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 425: Advanced Topics in Research on Self and Stigma

This course focuses on the relevance of self, identity, and stigmatization to understanding and remedying social problems. A key focus will be on how interactions between the self-system and social systems (e.g. schools, workplaces, institutions) drive outcomes over time, including educational and economic inequality. More broadly, class discussion and readings will address a social psychological analysis of intervention and change.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cohen, G. (PI)

EDUC 430A: Experimental Research Designs in Educational Research

The course will cover the following topics: a) the logic of causal inference and the Fisher/Neyman/Rubin counterfactual causal model (Fisher, 1935; Heckman, 1979; Holland, 1986; Neyman, 1990; Rubin, 1978); b) randomized experiments; c) complex randomized experiments in education (cluster randomized trials, multi-site trials, staggered implementation via randomization, etc.); d) policy experiments with randomization; e) meta-analysis; and f) power in randomized experiments; g) the ethics and politics of randomized experiments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bettinger, E. (PI)

EDUC 437: Curricular Practical Training

"Curricular Practical Training" independent study sections specifically created for international students in F-1 Visa Status who wish to receive credit and to be paid for internships.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 460: Language, Culture, Cognition, and Assessment

Examines the intersection of language, culture, and cognition, and the implications of this intersection in educational assessment. Knowledge from different disciplines is used to reason about assessment from the conceptual, methodological, and social perspectives.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Solano-Flores, G. (PI)

EDUC 465: Development and Psychological Sciences (DAPS) Faculty Student Seminar

Faculty and students in the DAPS graduate training program will convene to discuss how the disciplines of developmental and psychological sciences impact education, ground these issues in the work of current faculty and advanced student research, discuss professional development issues unique to this area, and share student perspectives on the field and their progress in the program. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 466: Doctoral Seminar in Curriculum Research

Required of all doctoral students in CTE, normally during their second year in the program. Students present their ideas regarding a dissertation or other research project, and prepare a short research proposal that often satisfies their second-year review.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 470: Practicum

For advanced graduate students. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Atkin, J. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Bridges, E. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Brown, N. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Davis, S. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Fogg, B. (PI); Gage, N. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Greeno, J. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Heath, S. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Levin, H. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); March, J. (PI); Martinez, A. (PI); Massy, W. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Mendoza-Newman, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); Noddings, N. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Perez-Granados, D. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Reich, R. (PI); Rickford, J. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rohlen, T. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Shulman, L. (PI); Simms, W. (PI); Spindler, G. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Stout, F. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thoresen, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Weiler, H. (PI); Williamson, J. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 480: Directed Reading

For advanced graduate students. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Adams, C. (PI); Alim, H. (PI); Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Atkin, J. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Banks, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Boaler, J. (PI); Bonnet, G. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Borko, H. (PI); Brazer, S. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bridges, E. (PI); Bromley, P. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Brown, N. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Carter, P. (PI); Cohen, G. (PI); Cotterman, K. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Dee, T. (PI); Domingue, B. (PI); Ehrlich, T. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Emery, D. (PI); Fogg, B. (PI); Fong, B. (PI); Forssell, K. (PI); Gage, N. (PI); Garcia, A. (PI); Gilbert, D. (PI); Goldenberg, C. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Greeno, J. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Haysman, C. (PI); Heath, S. (PI); Hoagland, G. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Kelman, A. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kijima, R. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); Kuboyama, E. (PI); Kushner, M. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Langer-Osuna, J. (PI); Levin, H. (PI); Levine, S. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Litvak, L. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Loyalka, P. (PI); Lyall, K. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); March, J. (PI); Martinez, A. (PI); Martinez, R. (PI); Massy, W. (PI); McCandliss, B. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Mendoza-Newman, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nandagopal, K. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); Noddings, N. (PI); O'Hara, S. (PI); Obradovic, J. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Osborne, J. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Peterson, M. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Plank, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Reich, R. (PI); Rickford, J. (PI); Rodriguez, E. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rohlen, T. (PI); Rosa, J. (PI); Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI); Salinas, N. (PI); Schorr, J. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Shulman, L. (PI); Simms, W. (PI); Solano-Flores, G. (PI); Sorcar, P. (PI); Spencer, S. (PI); Spindler, G. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stevens, M. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Stout, F. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thille, C. (PI); Thoresen, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Van Lare, M. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Weiler, H. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Williamson, P. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wolf, J. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); reardon, s. (PI); Mason, J. (GP)

EDUC 490: Directed Research

For advanced graduate students. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alim, H. (PI); Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Banks, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Boaler, J. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Borko, H. (PI); Brazer, S. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bromley, P. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Carter, P. (PI); Cohen, G. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Dee, T. (PI); Domingue, B. (PI); Ehrlich, T. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Fogg, B. (PI); Fong, B. (PI); Garcia, A. (PI); Gilbert, D. (PI); Goldenberg, C. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Hoagland, G. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Kelman, A. (PI); Kijima, R. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Koski, W. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); Kuboyama, E. (PI); Kushner, M. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Langer-Osuna, J. (PI); Levine, S. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Loyalka, P. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); Martinez, R. (PI); McCandliss, B. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); Obradovic, J. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Osborne, J. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Plank, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Rodriguez, E. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rosa, J. (PI); Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Solano-Flores, G. (PI); Sorcar, P. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stevens, M. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thille, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Williamson, P. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wolf, J. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 801: TGR Project

For advanced graduate students. Instructor consent required. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

EDUC 802: TGR Dissertation

For advanced graduate students. Instructor consent required. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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