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BIO 117: Biology and Global Change (EARTHSYS 111, ESS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

CEE 100: Managing Sustainable Building Projects

Managing the life cycle of buildings from the owner, designer, and contractor perspectives emphasizing sustainability goals; methods to define, communicate, coordinate, and manage multidisciplinary project objectives including scope, quality, life cycle cost and value, schedule, safety, energy, and social concerns; roles, responsibilities, and risks for project participants; virtual design and construction methods for product, organization, and process modeling; lifecycle assessment methods; individual writing assignment related to a real world project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fischer, M. (PI)

CEE 144: Design and Innovation for the Circular Economy

The last 150 years of our industrial evolution have been material and energy intensive. The linear model of production and consumption manufactures goods from raw materials, wells and uses them, and then discards the products as waste. Circular economy provides a framework for systems-level redesign. It builds on schools of thought including regenerative design, performance economy industrial ecology, blue economy, biomimicry, and cradle to cradle. This course introduces the concepts of the circular economy and applies them to case studies of consumer products, household goods, and fixed assets.n nStudents will conduct independent projects on circular economy. Students may work alone or in small teams under the guidance of the teaching team and various collaborators worldwide. Class is limited to 14 students. All disciplines are welcome. This class fulfills the Writing & Rhetoric 2 requirement. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 174A: Providing Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World

This course will cover basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to provide and control water, and will introduce the basics of engineering design. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. The course should enable students to work competently in environmental engineering firms or on non-profit projects in the developing world such as Engineers without Borders. Pre-requisite: Chem31B/X.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 176A: Energy Efficient Buildings

Quantitative evaluation of technologies and techniques for reducing energy demand of residential-scale buildings. Heating and cooling load calculations, financial analysis, passive-solar design techniques, water heating systems, photovoltaic system sizing for net-zero-energy all-electric homes. Offered for 3 or 4 units; the 4-unit option includes a lab.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Masters, G. (PI)

CEE 176B: Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency

This course introduces analysis, sizing and performance estimations (electrical and financial) of renewable energy systems on both sides of the electric meter with an emphasis on photovoltaics and wind-power systems. Basic electric power generation, transmission and distribution, as well as distributed generation will be introduced. Optional Laboratory section for a 4th unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Masters, G. (PI)

CEE 179C: Environmental Engineering Design

Application of engineering fundamentals including environmental engineering, hydrology, and engineering economy to a design problem. Enrollment limited; preference to seniors in Civil and Environmental Engineering.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Robertson, A. (PI)

CEE 207A: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 224A: Sustainable Development Studio

(Undergraduates, see 124.) Project-based. Sustainable design, development, use and evolution of buildings; connections of building systems to broader resource systems. Areas include architecture, structure, materials, energy, water, air, landscape, and food. Projects use a cradle-to-cradle approach focusing on technical and biological nutrient cycles and information and knowledge generation and organization. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 224Z: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 124Z)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 226: Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems

Life cycle modeling of products, industrial processes, and infrastructure/building systems; material and energy balances for large interdependent systems; environmental accounting; and life cycle costing. These methods, based on ISO 14000 standards, are used to examine emerging technologies, such as biobased products, building materials, building integrated photovoltaics, and alternative design strategies, such as remanufacturing, dematerialization, LEED, and Design for Environment: DfE. Student teams complete a life cycle assessment of a product or system chosen from industry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 226E: Advanced Topics in Integrated, Energy-Efficient Building Design

This class explores innovative methods for designing, developing, and financing high performance, low energy buildings. Students will learn best practices to reduce building energy buildings. Students will learn best practices to reduce building energy use and integrate solar PV generation in pursuit of commercial Net Zero Energy buildings. Lectures include presentations and panels featuring leading practitioners and researchers in the field. Optional site visits to local Net Zero Energy and LEED buildings provide context to support lectures. CEE 176A and CEE 156/256 or similar courses are recommended prerequisites but not required. All students are expected to participate in a group-based, term project focused on the design and development of a Net Zero Energy building. Students taking the course for two units will not be required to complete in-class assignments for individual homework assignments.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rumsey, P. (PI)

CEE 244A: Sustainable Banking Seminar

This seminar explores ideas for redesigning banks and the banking sector to achieve three goals: (1) keep the bank and its depositors safe, (2) keep the borrowers, communities, and societies affected by the bank's lending decisions safe, and (3) use bank transactions to improve the sustainability of natural ecosystems. Weekly speakers include bankers, bank regulators, and financial technology (fintech) innovators focused on sustainable banking.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cahan, B. (PI)

CEE 256: Building Systems (CEE 156)

HVAC, lighting, and envelope systems for commercial and institutional buildings, with a focus on energy efficient design. Knowledge and skills required in the development of low-energy buildings that provide high quality environment for occupants.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kolderup, E. (PI)

CEE 263A: Air Pollution Modeling

The numerical modeling of urban, regional, and global air pollution focusing on gas chemistry and radiative transfer. Stratospheric, free-tropospheric, and urban chemistry. Methods for solving stiff systems of chemical ordinary differential, including the multistep implicit-explicit method, Gear's method with sparse-matrix techniques, and the family method. Numerical methods of solving radiative transfer, coagulation, condensation, and chemical equilibrium problems. Project involves developing a basic chemical ordinary differential equation solver. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 263C: Weather and Storms (CEE 63)

Daily and severe weather and global climate. Topics: structure and composition of the atmosphere, fog and cloud formation, rainfall, local winds, wind energy, global circulation, jet streams, high and low pressure systems, inversions, el Niño, la Niña, atmosphere/ocean interactions, fronts, cyclones, thunderstorms, lightning, tornadoes, hurricanes, pollutant transport, global climate and atmospheric optics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 263D: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions (CEE 64)

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 263S: Atmosphere/Energy Seminar

Interdisciplinary seminar with talks by researchers and practitioners in the fields of atmospheric science and renewable energy engineering. Addresses the causes of climate, air pollution, and weather problems and methods of addressing these problems through renewable and efficient energy systems. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 265A: Sustainable Water Resources Development

Alternative criteria for judging the sustainability of projects. Application of criteria to evaluate sustainability of water resources projects in several countries. Case studies illustrate the role of political, social, economic, and environmental factors in decision making. Influence of international aid agencies and NGOs on water projects. Evaluation of benefit-cost analysis and environmental impact assessment as techniques for enhancing the sustainability of future projects. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Environmental and Water Studies, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ortolano, L. (PI)

CEE 265D: Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries

Economic, social, political, and technical aspects of sustainable water supply and sanitation service provision in developing countries. Service pricing, alternative institutional structures including privatization, and the role of consumer demand and community participation in the planning process. Environmental and public health considerations, and strategies for serving low-income households. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, see jennadavis.stanford.edu for application.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Davis, J. (PI)

CEE 269A: Environmental Engineering Seminar

Presentations on current research in environmental engineering by Civil & Environmental Engineering faculty.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fringer, O. (PI); Ong, C. (SI)

CEE 272R: Modern Power Systems Engineering

Focus is on Power Engineering from a systems point of view. Topics covered may include modeling of generation, transmission and distribution systems, load flow analysis, transient and steady-state stability analysis. Special emphasis given to modern market operations and dispatch, modeling intermittent controllable power sources, storage technologies, mechanisms for demand response, sensing the grid and the role of market mechanisms for deep integration. Course content may vary year to year.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rajagopal, R. (PI)

CEE 272T: SmartGrids and Advanced Power Systems Seminar (EE 292T)

A series of seminar and lectures focused on power engineering. Renowned researchers from universities and national labs will deliver bi-weekly seminars on the state of the art of power system engineering. Seminar topics may include: power system analysis and simulation, control and stability, new market mechanisms, computation challenges and solutions, detection and estimation, and the role of communications in the grid. The instructors will cover relevant background materials in the in-between weeks. The seminars are planned to continue throughout the next academic year, so the course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rajagopal, R. (PI)

CEE 273B: The Business of Water

One of the fastest growing economic sectors is the water field, and private water companies are playing an increasingly important role in improving water management around the world. In some cases, however, the involvement of private companies in the water sector has also proven controversial (e.g., when private companies have taken over public water supply systems in developing countries such as Bolivia). This course will look at established or emerging businesses in the water sector and the legal, economic, and social issues that they generate. These businesses include investor-owned water utilities, water technology companies (e.g., companies investing in new desalination or water recycling technologies), water-right funds (who directly buy and sell water rights), social impact funds, innovative agricultural operations, water concessionaires, and infrastructure construction companies and investors. Each week will focus on a different business and company. Company executives will attend the class session and discuss their business with the class. In most classes, we will examine (1) the viability and efficacy of the company's business plan, (2) the legal and/or social issues arising from the business' work, and (3) how the business might contribute to improved water management and policy. Each student will be expected to write (1) two short reflection papers during the course of the quarter on businesses that present to the class, and (2) a 15-page paper at the conclusion on the class on either a water company of the student's choice or a policy initiative that can improve the role that business plays in improving water management (either in a particular sector or more generally). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Civil & Environmental Engineering.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 277S: Design for a Sustainable World (CEE 177S)

Technology-based problems faced by developing communities worldwide. Student groups partner with organizations abroad to work on concept, feasibility, design, implementation, and evaluation phases of various projects. Past projects include a water and health initiative, a green school design, seismic safety, and medical device. Admission based on written application and interview. See http://esw.stanford.edu for application. (Staff)
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 277X: Current Topics in Sustainable Engineering (CEE 177X)

This course is the first half of a two quarter, project-based design course that addresses the cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students will be placed into one of three project teams and tackle a real-world design challenge in partnership with social entrepreneurs and NGOs. In CEE 177X/277X, students will gain the background skills and context necessary to effectively design engineering projects in developing nations. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center). Instructor consent required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 278A: Air Pollution Fundamentals

The sources and health effects of gaseous and particulate air pollutants. The influence of meteorology on pollution: temperature profiles, stability classes, inversion layers, turbulence. Atmospheric diffusion equations, downwind dispersion of emissions from point and line sources. Removal of air pollutants via settling, diffusion, coagulation, precipitation, Mechanisms for ozone formation, in the troposphere versus in the stratosphere. Effects of airborne particle size and composition on light scattering/absorption, and on visual range. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or equivalent. Recommended: 101B, CHEM 31A, or equivalents.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 301: The Energy Seminar (ENERGY 301, MS&E 494)

Interdisciplinary exploration of current energy challenges and opportunities, with talks by faculty, visitors, and students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Weyant, J. (PI)

CEE 323C: Infrastructure Finance and Governance

Presentation and discussion of early stage or more mature research on a variety of topics related to financing, governance and sustainability of civil infrastructure projects by researchers associated with the Global Projects Center and visiting speakers. To obtain one unit of credit, students must attend and participate in all seminars, with up to two excused absences. Seminar meets weekly during Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levitt, R. (PI)

EARTHSYS 104: The Water Course (GEOPHYS 70)

The Central Valley of California provides a third of the produce grown in the U.S., but has a desert climate, thus raising concerns about both food and water security. The pathway that water takes rainfall to the irrigation of fields (the water course) determines the quantity and quality of the available water. Working with various data sources (remote sensing, gauges, wells) allows us to model the water budget in the valley and explore the way in which recent droughts and increasing demand are impacting freshwater supplies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 288: Social and Environmental Tradeoffs in Climate Decision-Making (EARTHSYS 188)

How can we ensure that measures taken to mitigate global climate change don't create larger social and environmental problems? What metrics should be used to compare potential climate solutions beyond cost and technical feasibility, and how should these metrics be weighed against each other? How can modeling efforts and stakeholder engagement be best integrated into climate decision making? What information are we still missing to make fully informed decisions between technologies and policies? Exploration of these questions, alongside other issues related to potential negative externalities of emerging climate solutions. Evaluation of energy, land use, and geoengineering approaches in an integrated context, culminating in a climate stabilization group project.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 155: Environmental Economics and Policy

Economic sources of environmental problems and alternative policies for dealing with them (technology standards, emissions taxes, and marketable pollution permits). Evaluation of policies addressing local air pollution, global climate change, and the use of renewable resources. Connections between population growth, economic output, environmental quality, sustainable development, and human welfare. Prerequisite: ECON 50. May be taken concurrently with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goulder, L. (PI)

ECON 251: Natural Resource and Energy Economics

Economic theory and empirical analysis of non-renewable and renewable natural resources, with considerable attention to energy provision and use. Topics include: exhaustible resources; renewable resources; and energy industry market structure, pricing, and performance. Prerequisites: 202, 203, 204, 271, and 272, or equivalents with consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 341: Public Economics and Environmental Economics Seminar

Issues in measuring and evaluating the economic performance of government tax, expenditure, debt, and regulatory policies; their effects on levels and distribution of income, wealth, and environmental quality; alternative policies and methods of evaluation. Workshop format combines student research, faculty presentations, and guest speakers. Prerequisite: ECON 241 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 302: Behavior Design

Students learn Behavior Design and practice applying the methods to change human behavior in measurable ways. In this particular course, all projects will focus on one theme: Designing the first step.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fogg, B. (PI)

EDUC 332: Theory and Practice of Environmental Education

Foundational understanding of the history, theoretical underpinnings, and practice of environmental education as a tool for addressing today's pressing environmental issues. The purpose, design, and implementation of environmental education in formal and nonformal settings with youth and adult audiences. Field trip and community-based project offer opportunities for experiencing and engaging with environmental education initiatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ardoin, N. (PI)

EE 292H: Engineering, Entrepreneurship & Climate Change

The purpose of this seminar series course is to help students and professionals develop the tools to apply the engineering and entrepreneurial mindset to problems that stem from climate change, in order to consider and evaluate possible stabilizing, remedial and adaptive approaches. This course is not a crash course on climate change or policy. Instead we will focus on learning about and discussing the climate problems that seem most tractable to these approaches. Each week Dr. Field and/or a guest speaker will lead a short warm-up discussion/activity and then deliver a talk in his/her area of expertise. We will wrap up with small-group and full-class discussions of related challenges/opportunities and possible engineering-oriented solutions. Class members are asked to do background reading before each class, to submit a question before each lecture, and to do in-class brainstorming. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Field, L. (PI)

EE 293A: Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution (ENERGY 293A, MATSCI 156, MATSCI 256)

Operating principles and applications of emerging technological solutions to the energy demands of the world. The scale of global energy usage and requirements for possible solutions. Basic physics and chemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, and batteries. Performance issues, including economics, from the ideal device to the installed system. The promise of materials research for providing next generation solutions. Undergraduates register in 156 for 4 units; graduates register in 256 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 145 and 152 or equivalent coursework in thermodynamics and electronic properties.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clemens, B. (PI)

EE 293B: Fundamentals of Energy Processes (ENERGY 293B)

For seniors and graduate students. Covers scientific and engineering fundamentals of renewable energy processes involving heat. Thermodynamics, heat engines, solar thermal, geothermal, biomass. Recommended: MATH 19-21; PHYSICS 41, 43, 45
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 101: Energy and the Environment (EARTHSYS 101)

Energy use in modern society and the consequences of current and future energy use patterns. Case studies illustrate resource estimation, engineering analysis of energy systems, and options for managing carbon emissions. Focus is on energy definitions, use patterns, resource estimation, pollution. Recommended: MATH 21 or 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 101A: Energizing California

A weekend field trip featuring renewable and nonrenewable energy installations in Northern California. Tour geothermal, bioenergy, and natural gas field sites with expert guides from the Department of Energy Resources Engineering. Requirements: One campus meeting and weekend field trip. Enrollment limited to 25. Freshman have first choice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (EARTHSYS 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 104: Sustainable Energy for 9 Billion

This course explores the transition to a sustainable energy system at large scales (national and global), and over long time periods (decades). Explores the drivers of global energy demand and the fundamentals of technologies that can meet this demand sustainably. Focuses on constraints affecting large-scale deployment of technologies, as well as inertial factors affecting this transition. Problems will involve modeling global energy demand, deployment rates for sustainable technologies, technological learning and economics of technical change. Recommended: ENERGY 101, 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 110: Engineering Economics

The success of energy projects and companies is judged by technical, economic and financial criteria. This course will introduce concepts of engineering economy, e.g., time value of money, life cycle costs and financial metrics, and explore their application to the business of energy. We will use case studies, business school cases and possibly industry guest lecturers. Examples from the hydrocarbon businesses that dominate energy today will provide the framework for the analysis of both conventional and renewable energy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 123: When Technology Meets Reality; An In-depth Look at the Deepwater Horizon Blowout and Oil Spill

The Deepwater Horizon blowout and spill in April 2010 occurred on one of the most advanced deepwater drilling rigs in the world operated by one of the most experienced companies. In this course we will look at and discuss the technologies and management practices involved in deepwater drilling and discuss how an accident like this happens and what could have been done differently to avoid it. We will focus on the Horizon and also look briefly at other high profile industrial and technological accidents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sears, R. (PI)

ENERGY 160: Modeling Uncertainty in the Earth Sciences

Whether Earth Science modeling is performed on a local, regional or global scale, for scientific or engineering purposes, uncertainty is inherently present due to lack of data and lack of understanding of the underlying phenomena. This course highlights the various issues, techniques and practical tools available for modeling uncertainty of complex Earth systems as well as the impact uncertainty has on practical decisions for geo-engineering problems. The course focuses on practical breadth rather than theoretical depth. Topics covered are: the process of building models, sources of uncertainty, probabilistic techniques, spatial data analysis and geostatistics, grid and scale, spatio-temporal uncertainty, visualizing uncertainty in large dimensions, Monte Carlo simulation, sensitivity analysis, reducing uncertainty with data, value of information. Applications to both local (reservoir, aquifer) and global (climate) are covered through literature study. Extensive software use with SGEMS.nnPrerequisites: algebra (CME 104 or equivalent), introductory statistics course (CME 106 or equivalent).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 171: Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics (ENERGY 271)

Oil and gas represents more than 50% of global primary energy. In delivering energy at scale, the industry has developed global infrastructure with supporting technology that gives it enormous advantages in energy markets; this course explores how the oil and gas industry operates. From the perspective of these established systems and technologies, we will look at the complexity of energy systems, and will consider how installed infrastructure enables technology development and deployment, impacts energy supply, and how existing infrastructure and capital invested in fossil energy impacts renewable energy development. Prerequisites: Energy 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 214: The Global Price of Oil

Understanding the current and future price of oil requires the synthesis of geologic, engineering, financial, geopolitical, and macroeconomic information. In this seminar, we will build a global supply curve for petroleum by studying the marginal and full-cycle production costs for each of the major resource categories. We will study how reserve classification varies globally, and how global petroleum resources and reserves have changed and are likely to change over time. We will further investigate how the time lag between resource discovery, project sanctioning, and full production will affect future supply. Finally, we will study the elasticity of oil demand and how that demand is likely to change over time as the developing world gets richer and as competition from other energy sources increases.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; House, K. (PI); Guo, H. (TA)

ENERGY 271: Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics (ENERGY 171)

Oil and gas represents more than 50% of global primary energy. In delivering energy at scale, the industry has developed global infrastructure with supporting technology that gives it enormous advantages in energy markets; this course explores how the oil and gas industry operates. From the perspective of these established systems and technologies, we will look at the complexity of energy systems, and will consider how installed infrastructure enables technology development and deployment, impacts energy supply, and how existing infrastructure and capital invested in fossil energy impacts renewable energy development. Prerequisites: Energy 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENVRES 225: E-IPER Current Topics Seminar

For E-IPER Ph.D and Joint M.S. students only. Weekly presentations of E-IPER students' research and other program-related projects. Occasional guest speakers. Individual or team presentation, active participation, and regular attendance required for credit. May be taken for credit a maximum of two times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barsom, S. (PI)

ENVRES 280: Introduction to Environmental Science

For E-IPER Joint M.S. students only. This course functions as a gateway for E-IPER Joint M.S. students to learn about the variety of environmental science conducted by the program's affiliated faculty. Topics include oceans, green chemistry, water policy, energy, and others. Students engage in problem solving related to the application of science to business, law, and the conservation of natural resources.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENVRES 290: Capstone Project Seminar in Environment and Resources

Required for and limited to E-IPER Joint M.S. students. Propose, conduct and publicly present final individual or team projects demonstrating the integration of professional (M.B.A., J.D., or M.D.) and M.S. in Environment and Resources degrees. Presentation and submission of final product required. 3 total units required; can all be taken during one quarter or divided over two sequential quarters.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENVRES 380: Innovating Large Scale Sustainable Transformations (SUST 230)

This class establishes innovation of systemic transformations as a crucial leadership modality. It gives students the mindsets, theoretical framework, and hands-on experience in shaping innovative interventions that bring about scaled and profound transformations in the face of complex multi-factorial challenges. Students are immersed in the Deep Change Methodology, which combines systems thinking, strategy, design thinking, behavioral sciences, resilience theory, diffusion theory, decision theory, and a theoretical framework around scaled multistake-holder interventions. Tools and theories introduced in class will be used to structure large-scale transformations that simultaneously create sustainability and resilience on environmental, societal, and economic fronts. This project-based team-based class challenges students to find solutions for complex real world challenges. Consent of instructor required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 270: Analyzing land use in a globalized world (ESS 170)

This course examines the dynamics of land use in relation to globalization. The objective is to understand how the expansion of global trade, and public and private regulations affect land use changes. The course will enable students to better understand how to effectively influence land use change, from different vantage points (government, NGO, corporate actor¿). The main emphasis is on tropical regions. Lectures introduce theories, practical cases, and evaluation tools to better understand contemporary land use dynamics.
Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lambin, E. (PI)

ESS 280: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (EARTHSYS 180)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Archie, P. (PI)

ESS 282: Designing Educational Gardens (EARTHSYS 182)

A project-based course emphasizing 'ways of doing 's sustainable agricultural systems based at the new Stanford Educational Farm. Students will work individually and in small groups on the design of a new educational garden and related programs for the Stanford Educational Farm. The class will meet on 6 Fridays over the course of winter quarter. Class meetings will include an introduction to designing learning gardens and affiliated programs, 3 field trips to exemplary educational gardens in the bay area that will include tours and discussions with garden educators, and work sessions for student projects. By application only.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ESS 305: Climate Change: An Earth Systems Perspective

This is an introductory graduate-level course that is intended to provide an overview of leading-edge research topics in the area of climate change. Lectures introduce the physical, biogeochemical, ecological, and human dimensions of climate change, with emphasis on understanding climate change from an Earth System perspective (e.g., nonlinearities, feedbacks, thresholds, tipping points, resilience, vulnerability, risk). The emphasis is on providing an initial introduction to the process by which researchers pose questions and analyze and interpret results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Diffenbaugh, N. (PI)

GSBGEN 335: Clean Energy Project Development and Finance

This case study-oriented course will focus on the critical skills needed to evaluate, develop, finance (on a non-recourse basis), and complete standalone energy and infrastructure projects. The primary course materials will be documents from several representative projects - e.g. solar, wind, storage, carbon capture - covering key areas including market and feasibility studies, environmental permitting and regulatory decisions, financial disclosure from bank and bond transactions, and construction, input, and offtake contracts. Documents and economic models tend to be highly customized. By taking a forensic approach, looking at several different projects, we can learn how project developers, financiers, and lawyers work to get deals over the finish line that meet the demands of the market, the requirements of the law, and (sometimes) broader societal goals, in particular climate change, economic competitiveness, and energy security.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 336: Energy Markets and Policy

This is a course on how energy and environmental markets work, and the regulatory mechanisms that have been and can be used to achieve desired policy goals. The course uses a electricity market game as a central teaching tool. In the game, students play the role of electricity generators and retailers in order to gain an understanding of how market rules (including environmental regulations and renewable energy mandates) affect the business strategy of market participants - and in turn economic and environmental outcomes.nnThe goal of the course is to provide students with both theoretical and hands-on understanding of important energy and environmental market concepts that are critical to market functioning but not always widely appreciated. Concepts covered include: 1) regulated price-setting versus price-setting through market mechanisms, 2) BTU arbitragenin input energy choices, 3) uniform price vs. pay-as-bid auctions, 4) the ability and incentive to exercise unilateral market power, 5) unilateral versus coordinated exercise of market power, 6) transmission congestion, 7) forward contracts and their effect on market functioning, 8) dynamic pricing of electricity and active involvement of final demand, 9) the nature of energy reserves, 10) carbon pricing mechanisms including taxes and cap-and trade systems, 11) renewable portfolio standards and other renewable energy incentives, 12) determination of levelized cost of energy (LCOE) and its impact on new capacity investment decisions, and 13) interactions between environmental mechanisms and regulations. We will also discuss the key features of the markets for major sources of energy such as oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, solar, wind, and biomass.nnThe course is useful background for private sector roles in energy production, research, management, trading, investment, and government and regulatory affairs; government positions in policymaking and regulation; research and policy functions in academia, think tanks, or consultancies; and non-profit advocacy roles related to energy and the environment.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 532: Clean Energy Opportunities

This course examines business models and opportunities related to clean energy, specifically to low-carbon energy. We examine emerging trends for this sector in the context of technological change, business opportunities and the parameters set by public policy.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 569: The Open Road: Innovation in Cars, Driving, and Mobility

This course will look at ongoing and upcoming innovation in cars, driving, and mobility from three perspectives: (1) technology, (2) economics & business Models, and (3) policy. We'll survey changes in powering vehicles (e.g. electrification and biofuels), in vehicle connectivity and communications, and most especially changes in autonomy and self-driving vehicles. We'll look at changes in the economics of cars, vehicles, and driving ¿new business models, shared ownership, mobility as a service, as well as who some of the major players are in this nascent field and what they're doing/developing. And we'll explore the interactions of technology and economics with policy and broader societal changes-¿direct effects like safety, legal liability, and who can drive; indirect effects on traffic, insurance, infrastructure needs, fuel taxes, and the environment; as well as longer-term and even bigger changes in daily life and where and how we live, work, and drive.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

INTNLREL 135A: International Environmental Law and Policy

This course addresses the nature, content, and structure of international environmental law. We will discuss its sources (formal and informal) and general principles, along with the emerging principles (sustainable development, precautionary principle, etc.) We will evaluate the role of international and non-governmental organizations, as well as examine the negotiation, conclusion, and implementation of international environmental agreements. Problem areas to be examined include global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, exports of hazardous substances, transboundary pollution, trade and environment, and development and environment. RECOMMENDED PREREQ: students have completed POLISCI 101 and/or INTNLREL 140A
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lutomski, P. (PI)

LAW 2508: The Business of Water

One of the fastest growing economic sectors is the water field, and private water companies are playing an increasingly important role around the world in water management. In many cases, private companies have made important contributions to meeting water needs (e.g., in the development of new technologies and expanding water supplies). In other cases, however, the involvement of private companies has proven controversial (e.g., when private companies have taken over public water supply systems in developing countries such as Bolivia). This course will look at established or emerging businesses in the water sector and the legal, economic, and social issues that they generate. These businesses include investor-owned water utilities, water technology companies (e.g., companies investing in new desalination or water recycling technologies), water-right funds (who directly buy and sell water rights), social impact funds, innovative agricultural operations, water concessionaires, and infrastructure construction companies and investors. Each week will focus on a different business and company. Company executives will attend the class session and discuss their business with the class. In most classes, we will examine (1) the viability and efficacy of the company's business plan, (2) the legal and/or social issues arising from the business' work, and (3) how the business might contribute to improved water management and policy. Each student will be expected to write (1) two short reflection papers during the course of the quarter on businesses that present to the class, and (2) a 10- to15-page paper at the conclusion on the class on either a water company of the student's choice or a policy initiative that can improve the role that business plays in improving water management (either in a particular sector or more generally). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE 273B).
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 2509: Clean Energy Project Development and Finance

(Formerly Law 774) This case study-oriented course will focus on the critical skills needed to evaluate, develop, finance (on a non-recourse basis), and complete standalone energy and infrastructure projects. The primary course materials will be documents from several representative projects -- e.g., solar, wind, storage, carbon capture, transmission, combined heat & power -- covering key areas including market and feasibility studies, environmental permitting and regulatory decisions, financial disclosure from bank and bond transactions, and construction, input, and offtake contracts. For virtually every clean energy project, legal documents and financial/business models tend to highly customized. By examining actual projects and transactions we can learn how developers, financiers, and lawyers work to get deals over the finish line--deals that meet the demands of the market, the requirements of the law, and (sometimes) broader societal goals, in particular climate change, economic competitiveness, and energy security. Elements used in grading: Class Participation (35 %), Lecture-based Assignment (15 %), Group Project (50 %). Absences affect grade. Also open to engineering graduate students. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with Graduate School of Business (GSBGEN 335).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

MATSCI 302: Solar Cells

This course takes a comprehensive view of solar cells and what will need to be done to enable them to substantially change how the world obtains its electricity. After covering the fundamentals (light trapping, current flow in pn junctions, recombination) that are important for almost all photovoltaic technologies, the course will address technologies based on highly crystalline forms of silicon and gallium arsenide. The device simulator PC1D will be used to model solar cells. The course will then go through multijunctions cells with concentrators, low-cost thin-film solar cells, organic semiconductors, hybrid perovskites and nanowires. There will be discussions of module design and the economics of the solar industry. There will be a tour of a company that makes solar cells and guest lectures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 243: Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis

Concepts, methods, and applications. Energy/environmental policy issues such as automobile fuel economy regulation, global climate change, research and development policy, and environmental benefit assessment. Group project. Prerequisite: MS&E 241 or ECON 50, 51.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sweeney, J. (PI)

PHYSICS 240: Introduction to the Physics of Energy

Energy as a consumable. Forms and interconvertability. World Joule budget. Equivalents in rivers, oil pipelines and nuclear weapons. Quantum mechanics of fire, batteries and fuel cells. Hydrocarbon and hydrogen synthesis. Fundamental limits to mechanical, electrical and magnetic strengths of materials. Flywheels, capacitors and high pressure tanks. Principles of AC and DC power transmission. Impossibility of pure electricity storage. Surge and peaking. Solar constant. Photovoltaic and thermal solar conversion. Physical limits on agriculture.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laughlin, R. (PI)

STRAMGT 574: Strategic Thinking in Action - In Business and Beyond (II)

This six-session 2-point Bass seminar will involve students (maximum 24) in analyzing the emerging global electric automotive industry by focusing on: (1) The electric automotive industry in the U.S. and Europe, (2) the electric automotive industry in Japan and Korea, and (3) the electric automotive industry in China. We will each time examine the strategies of the key automotive companies as well as that of the government and other key players such as infrastructure providers. The purpose of the seminar is to help students sharpen their skills in identifying facilitating and impeding forces of strategic change, and in assessing and estimating the direction and rate of strategic change. While the instructors will provide relevant pre- readings related to these topics, students will be expected to complement these materials with their own research of theoretical and empirical sources. They will also be expected to help structure the discussion and move it forward toward conclusions. Students will organize into three teams each focused on one of the regions and prepare a five-to-ten page group report of their most important findings and conclusions that extend current knowledge.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

URBANST 164: Sustainable Cities (EARTHSYS 160)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chan, D. (PI)

URBANST 165: Sustainable Urban and Regional Transportation Planning

Environmental, economic, and equity aspects of urban transportation in 21st-century U.S. Expanded choices in urban and regional mobility that do not diminish resources for future generations. Implications for the global environment and the livability of communities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kott, J. (PI)
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