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AFRICAAM 20A: Jazz Theory (MUSIC 20A)

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: 19 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nadel, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 37: Chocolate Heads Performance Project: Dance & Intercultural Performance Creation (DANCE 30)

Students from diverse dance styles (ballet to hip-hop to contemporary) participate in the dance-making/remix process and collaborate with musicians, visual artists, designers and spoken word artists, to co-create a multidisciplinary finished production and installation. Students of all dance or athletic backgrounds are welcome to audition on Wednesday, September 28th and Monday, October 4th during class time. Visual artists, musicians and dancers may also contact the instructor for further information at ahayes1@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 45: Dance Improv StratLab: Freestyle Improvisation from Contemporary to Hip Hop & Beyond (DANCE 45)

This class is an arena for physical and artistic exploration to fire the imagination of dance improvisers, cultivate sensation and perception within and without studio practice and to promote interactive intelligence.nStudents will learn to harness and transform habitual movement patterns and dance trainings as resources for new ways of moving: expand their awareness of being a part of a bigger picture, while being attentive to everything all at once: and to use visual, aural and kinesthetic responses to convert those impulses into artistic material. Class will be accompanied by live and recorded music and include weekly jam sessions. Open to students from all dance, movement, athletic backgrounds and skill levels. Beginners welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 156: Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson (CSRE 156T, TAPS 156, TAPS 356)

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 48N: The American Songbook and Love Poetry (ENGLISH 48N)

A study of performances (Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra etc) of songs by classic American composers (Porter, Rogers and Hart, Cohen).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fields, K. (PI)

AMSTUD 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hodge, C. (PI)

AMSTUD 186B: American Song in the 20th Century and after (MUSIC 186B, MUSIC 286B)

Critical and creative exploration of song in the Americas. About twenty-five key examples will guide discussion of the interactions between words, music, performance and culture. Weekly listening, reading and assignments will be organized around central themes: love, sex and romance; war and politics; labor and money; place; identity; society and everyday life. Genres include art song; blues, gospel, jazz and country; pop, soul, rock and hip-hop; bossa nova, nueva canción and salsa; electronic and experimental. Takehome and in-class assignments will include critical and creative writing, and music composition, production and performance; final projects may emphasize any of the above.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANES 72Q: The Art of Medical Diagnosis

The Art of Medical Diagnosis: Enhancing Observational Skills through the Study of Art is an interactive, multidisciplinary undergraduate course that explores various ways in which studying art increases critical observational skills vital for aspiring health care providers. Students will be introduced to the concept of `Visual Thinking Strategies¿ through classroom, art creation, and museum based activities. Students will apply these skills to both works of art and medical cases. Significant focus will be on engaging in group discussions where they will collaboratively use visual evidence to generate and defend hypothesis. Drawing and sketching from life will play a critical role in honing observational skills through weekly assignments, workshops, and a final project. The interactive nature of this course pivots students away from a typical lecture based course to a self-directed learning experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 178A: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

APPPHYS 10AX: The Expressive Vessel: An Immersive Introduction to Clay

Students learn to make and to analyze functional ceramic forms with a focus on wheel-thrown pottery. Studio time dedicated to the acquisition and refinement of shaping, marking/glazing and finishing skills; supplementary lectures and discussions to explore contemporary studio ceramics and major historical traditions. No prior experience necessary; instructors will tailor assignments for students at all levels of ability.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fuzzell, D. (PI)

APPPHYS 100: The Questions of Clay: Craft, Creativity and Scientific Process

Students will create individual studio portfolios of ceramic work and pursue technical investigations of clay properties and the firing process using modern scientific equipment. Emphasis on development of creative process; parallels between science and traditional craft; integration of creative expression with scientific method and analysis. Prior ceramics experience desirable but not necessary. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: any level of background in physics, Instructor permission.
Terms: Win, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mabuchi, H. (PI)

ARCHLGY 106A: Museums and Collections (ARCHLGY 306A)

Practical, theoretical, and ethical issues which face museums and collections. Practical collections-based work, museum visits, and display research. The roles of the museum in contemporary society. Students develop their own exhibition and engage with the issues surrounding the preservation of material culture.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARCHLGY 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hodge, C. (PI)

ARTHIST 105B: Medieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture (ARTHIST 305B, DLCL 123)

The course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages in particular the art and architecture of the period. The Middle Ages is presented as a network of global economies, fueled by a desire for natural resources, access to luxury goods and holy sites. We will study a large geographical area encompassing the British Isles, Europe, the Mediterranean, Central Asia, India, and East Africa and trace the connectivity of these lands in economic, political, religious, and artistic terms from the fourth to the fourteenth century C.E. The students will have two lectures and one discussion session per week. Depending on the size of the class, it is possible that a graduate student TA will run the discussion session. Our goal is to give a skills-oriented approach to the Middle Ages and to engage students in creative projects that will satisfy 1. Ways-Creative Expression requirement as well as one of the following two: Ways-Analytical Interpretive or Ways-Engaging Difference.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 18AX: Digital & Black and White Photography

For students interested in the history and contemporary practice of portrait photography. At a time when pictures are being produced and disseminated in unprecedented proliferation, and the 'selfie' has become a key part of popular photographic discourse, we will look at the complexities of portraiture in terms of skill sets and processes, aesthetics and styles, ideology and identity. The course is a hybrid of black & white and digital photography, and will engage with such dualities as private/public, professional/amateur and traditional/innovative in the pursuit of capturing the self through the looking glass, beyond pose and persona. Assignments will include working individually and collaboratively with black & white film as well as digital equipment, experimenting with different lights and lighting techniques, and research into resources ranging from personal family portraits to the Cantor Museum archives.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Calm, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 130: Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino (ARTSTUDI 231A)

Students use electronics and software to create kinetic and interactive elements in artwork. No prior knowledge of electronics or software is required. Students learn to program the Arduino, a small easy-to-use microprocessor control unit ( see http://www.arduino.cc/ ). Learn to connect various sensors such as light, motion, sound and touch and use them to control software. Learn to interface actuators like motors, lights and solenoids to create movement. Learn to connect the Arduino to theMAX/MSP/Jitter programming environment to create media-intensive video and audio environments. Explore the social dimensions of electronic art. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 131: Sound Art I (MUSIC 154A)

Acoustic, digital and analog approaches to sound art. Familiarization with techniques of listening, recording, digital processing and production. Required listening and readings in the history and contemporary practice of sound art. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 139: Portraiture and Facial Anatomy for Artists (SURG 241)

Focus is on the art of portraiture and underlying structures of the face, fundamental anatomical elements such as the skull and muscles of facial expressions, and the intersections between human anatomy and art. Studio sessions incorporate plastic models, dry bones, cadaveric specimens, and live models. Encourages use of proper anatomical terminology for describing structures and their relationships.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ARTSTUDI 140: Drawing I

Functional anatomy and perspective as they apply to problems of drawing the form in space. Individual and group instruction as students work from still life set-ups, nature, and the model. Emphasis is on the development of critical skills and perceptual drawing techniques for those with little or no previous experience with pastels, inks, charcoal, conte, and pencil. Lectures alternate with studio work. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 141: Plein Air Painting Now

Surrounded by so many technologies for image production, why choose to take a course based on a style of painting developed over a hundred years ago? The standard answer to this question has changed remarkably little. Rather than answering that the camera cannot capture what the eye sees, we might instead respond that neither the computer, nor the camera, nor video, can reproduce in paint the subjective gaze of the contemporary viewer. Contained within this answer lies the trajectory for the class "PLEIN AIR PAINTING NOW!"nnIn this course students will be introduced to various water based media appropriate for plein air painting and learn various techniques and strategies for making paintings outdoors. The course will include the traditional discussions of brushes, paints, the different types of supports as well as easels, umbrellas and chairs. A broad variety of painting techniques will be demonstrated. We will set up in various locations around campus, paying particular attention to the specifics of the siteas this will serve as the jumping off point for discussion of the readings that form the second component of the class.nnPlease note that this class takes place outdoors. Plan accordingly, as we will be meeting in various locations around campus, and will be subject to inclement weather.Freshmen and Sophomores receive priority for enrollment. This is a designated CREATIVE EXPRESSIONS course.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Deas, Y. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 141S: Plein Air Drawing

In this introductory class, we take drawing out into the world, exploring different environments, techniques, and approaches as we go. The fundamental nuts-and-bolts of basic drawing techniques: light logic, depicting depth and drawing the figure, are integrated into each environment. From the Stanford campus: its cafe's, architecture and landscaping, to redwoods and water, to more urban settings, drawings will range from high-speed gestures to longer, more contemplative work. Through pen, graphite, charcoal, ink, watercolor/gouache and mixed media, we explore dichotomous relationships, as well as those in seemingly perfect harmony. We move from the inanimate to animate, figure and architecture, motion and stillness, to the micro and macro, considering how even the smallest patch of earth may be as monumental as Hoover Tower. Both beginning and advanced students are welcome. Summer.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 145: Painting I

Introduction to techniques, materials, and vocabulary in oil painting. Still life, landscape, and figure used as subject matter. Emphasis is on painting and drawing from life. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 147: Art Book Object

Explores contemporary aesthetic interpretations of the book as an art object while invigorating traditional artistic practices of the art of the book. Through the medium of drawing, collage, and mixed media students produce their own artist's book. The course familiarizes students with bookbinding and the various techniques used, as well as exploring the narrative, text and image, and the book as a sculptural object.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wight, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 147S: DRAWING AND PAINTING INTENSIVE

This introductory course teaches the basic tools of drawing and painting with acrylics, along with an introduction to a range of artists for inspiration. From the beginning, we take advantage of Stanford¿s beautiful campus, drawing and painting outside, along with studio work and slide lectures. We begin with our unique gestures and mark-making, moving through linear perspective, light logic, photo-realism, and the figure, using a range of media from graphite and charcoal to bamboo brush and ink. The introduction to acrylic painting explores the many ways we may use acrylic paint, looking at different art historical approaches along the way. A flexible medium, acrylic can be used to mimic watercolor, oil paint, or even cement, and works on a variety of surfaces. We begin by learning color theory and different paint applications through abstract painting, taking as our inspiration Piet Mondrian, Hans Hofmann, and J.W. Turner. Using thick, impasto paint, we move outdoors for plein air painting, stealing strategies from the Impressionists, and adapting them in our personal projects with today¿s technologies. Moving back indoors, we switch it up again, exploring the expressive gesture, and figurative distortion, using acrylic now more thinly, a la watercolor or gouache, along with charcoal, creating dramatic effects, and working on different surfaces. Each student will finish the quarter with a wide range of techniques and materials at the ready. No previous painting or drawing experience is necessary.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Deas, Y. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 148: Monotype

Introduction to printmaking using monotype, a graphic art medium used by such artists as Blake, Degas, Gauguin, and Pendergast. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 140. (lower level). May be repeated 2 times for total of 8 units.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 148A: Lithography

The classic technique of printing from limestones. Techniques to draw an image on the stone, etch and fix the image on the stone, and print it in numbered editions. Students work on a variety of stone sizes. Field trips to local publishers of lithography or lithography exhibitions. (lower level)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kain, K. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 148B: Introduction to Printmaking

Techniques such as monotype, monoprint, photocopy transfers, linocut and woodcut, intaglio etching. Demonstrations of these techniques. Field trips to local print collections or print exhibitions. (lower level)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wilson, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 148P: The Hybrid Print

This class explores experimental printmaking methods where digital and traditional practices collide. It focuses on the interchange between conventional and new methods of printmaking, and possibilities for the print beyond paper and the flat picture plane in contemporary art. Techniques will be demonstrated in class, and students will pursue projects using these techniques, developing their own conceptual interests. We will explore digital processes using large format printers, as well as digitally augmented traditional printmaking methods such as monoprints, collographs, woodblock and linocut, aided by dye sublimation, vinyl cutting, and 3-d printing. Students will have access to a wide array of both digital and traditional tools, and will develop projects using a combination of methods, resulting in a body of work. Discussions will address the expansive nature of contemporary fine art printmaking.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wight, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 151: Sculpture I

Traditional and non-traditional approaches to sculpture production through working with materials including wood, metal, and plaster. Conceptual and technical skills, and safe and appropriate use of tools and materials. Impact of material and technique upon form and content; the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Historical and contemporary forming methods provide a theoretical basis for studio work. Field trips; guest lecturers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 153: Ecology of Materials

Studio-based sculpture course. Materials used in sculpture and environmental concerns surrounding them. Artists concerned with environmental impact and the interconnection of art with other fields. The impact of material and technique upon form and content; understanding the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Conceptual and technical considerations. Group discussions, critiques, readings, video presentations, a field trip to a local artist-in-residence program, and visiting lecturers. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 153N: Ecology of Materials

This hands on studio based sculpture course takes a critical look at the materials used in sculpture and addresses the environmental concerns surrounding them. We will look at artists concerned with environmental impact and the interconnection of art to other fields. This class also addresses the impact of material and technique upon form and content; therefore understanding the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Conceptual and technical considerations will be addressed. Students will learn traditional building techniques as needed (wood shop, metal shop, mold making, found object) as well as anti-object techniques. Existing at the intersection of art, science, technology and ecology, environmental art often functions to inform and/or interpret natural conditions and the processes associated with both "non-human" and "human-made" constructions. It will also educate us about environmental issues and concerns. This course introduces and provides a context for this area of interdisciplinary exchange and artist production by examining areas commonly known as cradle to cradle design, land art, eco art, environmental art, and art and technology. What role does sculpture play in a fragile world with depleting natural resources, global economies and media dominance? What is the life cycle of object making and creating? What is our relationship to objects in a growing technological age? Students will make 3-4 projects based on these questions. Group discussions, critiques, readings, video presentations, a field trip to a local artist-in-residence program Recology at the San Francisco Dump, visiting artists and visiting faculty from Stanford doing environmental research will augment this class.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 155: Social Sculpture

This course investigates the immediacy of the body as material and sculpture in order to investigate private and social spaces. Actions are often used to understand or question the function and psychological aspects of a space and are documented for the perpetuation of these ideas. Throughout the quarter we will investigate the body as material and develop site specific performances enacted for: Private/Domestic and Public Space; Constructed Space & Physical Space; ecological systems; and generate both Individual & Collaborative based Actions, Interventions, & Events."
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 156Q: Installation Art in Time and Space

This hands on studio based sculpture course focuses on developing concepts, and creating a site-specific installation art project. This class will addresses the impact of material and technique upon form and content; therefore understanding the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Conceptual and technical considerations will be addressed. Students will learn traditional building techniques as needed (wood shop, metal shop, mold making, found object) as well as anti-object techniques. Students will make 3-4 projects that will culminate in a final site-specific installation. We will look at contemporary artists working in the field of installation art. Group discussions, critiques, readings, video presentations, field trips and visiting artists will augment the class. Installation Art is based on the merger of Space and Time and on a relationship between the artist and the visitor. Utilizing your interests and abilities in a variety of subjects and media, you will create environments that immerse the viewer in a sensory/ intellectual/ emotional experience. The material and methods you use can range from everyday objects, to highly personalized forms, from appropriated sounds to surveillance video, from large wall drawings to interactive switches for the participant to manipulate. The class will consist of demonstrations of art skills particularly useful in installation (sculptural, video, audio, interactive media, etc), presentations by the professor, research and reports and journal entries, and weekly critique. Installation Art is a pervasive, varied, global practice for art-making that acts as a gathering place for expression in all media addressing all subjects in a wide range of styles by broad grouping of artists."
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 160: Intro to Digital / Physical Design

Contemporary production processes ¿ both manufacturing and media processes ¿ often span the digital and the physical. 3D Depth cameras can scan real world models or movements, which can be manipulated or adjusted digitally, then re-output to the physical world via a myriad of 2D and 3D printing and laser cutting technologies. Crowd sourced information is uploaded to social media, which in turn guides our physical meeting places. Google street-view maps our physical world, and augmented reality displays overlay it. How as artists or designers to we grapple with and use this digital / physical permeability to create new experiences and meaning for our current time? This introductory studio course explores various tool sets as well as artists working across these genres. This course is a good baseline exploration for anyone interested in designing or making art with emerging contemporary tools.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Odell, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 162: Embodied Interfaces

Our computers, phones and devices ¿see¿ us predominately as fingers and single eyes staring at screens. What would happen if our technology acknowledged more of our rich physical presence and capabilities in its design? How have artists and designers used different sensing technologies to account for more of our embodied selves in their works? In this studio course we will explore various sensing technologies and design pieces that engage our whole selves. Interfaces explored will range from the practical to the poetic. Sensors may involve flex sensors, heat sensors, microphones and simple camera tracking technology. We will analyze different tools for their appropriateness for different tasks and extend them through our designs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mendoza, N. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 163: Drawing with Code

This studio course will engage coding practices as drawing tools. What makes a good algorithmic composition? How do we craft rule-sets and parameters to shape an interesting work? What changes if we conceive of still outputs, ongoing processes, or interactive processes as the "finished" work? We will look at the history of algorithmic drawing, including analog precedents like Sol LeWitt and other conceptual artists, along with current pioneers like John Simon Jr., Casey Reas, and LIA. Outputs will involve prints as well as screen-based works. Some basic coding experience is helpful, but not required. Assignments are based on conceptual principals that students can engage with at different coding skill levels. This is a good way for non CS students to explore coding practices as well as for CS students to hone their skills. We will work primarily in the free Processing software for our explorations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ganucheau, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 165: Social Media and Performative Practices

How can social media, mobile applications, or other more traditional media be used to engage people in new social situations? Could you design an app that gets people to talk with strangers (Miranda July), or a poster that causes a revolt in an office space (Packard Jennings), or a truck that changes how people think about nursing mothers (Jill Miller)? What about platforms that encourage political dialog or social changes? This studio course examines how contemporary artists and designers engage people in a process of social dialog, critique and political change through the existing media and non-traditional art practices.nnWith the constant development of new apps and social media platforms and the pressure from society of everyone having an online presence, the class will investigate and focus specifically on how these tools can be used as a resource to create and present artworks creatively. The students in this class will be introduced to a variety of artwork examples and study different artist¿s approach to media, technically as well as conceptually. Experimentation is highly emphasized throughout this course, as the goal is for the students to create and produce works that uses social media in new ways to tell stories, connect with, mystify or surprise the audience.nnA selection of software such as Photoshop, Premiere Pro, After Affects, and other tools will be introduced in class that will assist the students in producing work for the required assignments.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Miller, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 167: Introduction to Animation

Projects in animation techniques including flipbook, cutout/collage, stop-motion such as claymation, pixilation, and puppet animation, rotoscoping, and time-lapse. Films. Computers used as post-production tools, but course does not cover computer-generated animation. (lower level)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Miyazaki, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 168: Data as Material

How can data be used as ¿material¿ in art and design projects. Beyond straight-forward ideas of ¿data-visualization¿, this studio course seeks to investigate how we construct meaning from sets of information, and how the construction of those sets determines the meaning itself. This course also investigates different display aesthetics and how this is also a strategy for generating meaning. Artists studied include those who use various forms of personal, public, and social data as part of their practice. Historical examples from conceptual artists and other genres are considered along with contemporary artists working with data in digital or hybrid digital/physical formats.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 170: PHOTOGRAPHY I: BLACK AND WHITE

Through film and dark room instruction, students learn to use a SLR 35-mm camera and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed). They develop an awareness of light and its various properties and possibilities. Students become familiar with black and white darkroom techniques creating contact sheets and to evaluating prints, make corrections and re-print. They acquire essential knowledge of historical and contemporary black and white art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 170S: Introduction to Photo- Summer

Critical, theoretical, and practical aspects of creative photography through camera and lab techniques. Field work. Cantor Art Center and Art Gallery exhibitions. Course requires the use of a 35mm camera. The Department will supply if necessary. Summer. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 171: PHOTOGRAPHY I: DIGITAL

Through digital instruction, students learn to use a DSLR camera and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, color temp/white balance). They become familiar with basic scanning techniques (appropriated images, not negatives) on a flatbed scanner, and basic digital printing (in color). They learn basic file management as well as the use of Adobe Lightroom software. They are taught to operate 17¿-wide Epson digital printers, to print digital proof sheets, and to evaluate prints, correct files and re-print. Students acquire an essential knowledge of contemporary art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 173E: Cell Phone Photography

The course combines the critical analysis of cell phone photography with the creation of photographic art works that explore this specific medium's experimental, social and documentary potential. The increasing ubiquity of cell phone photography has had a widespread impact on the practice of photography as an art form. We will consider and discuss the ways in which the platforms of cell phone photography (Instagram, Snapchat) are democratizing image-making and transforming notions of authorship and subjectivity to an unprecedented extent, but also how the use of new technological tools help expand notions of creativity and aesthetic standards.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Peck, S. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 174B: Creativity in the Age of Facebook: Making Art for and from Networks

This class explores the history, practice and technique of creating art on and for the internet. Discussions, projects and readings focus on the ways in which internet art embodies changing ideas about artistic creation, technology, and interactivity as a way of blurring the line between artist and audience. Setting recent work against the backdrop of earlier moments in contemporary art (found object art, photomontage), this course also situates internet art in the pre-internet tradition of finding new perspectives on, and meanings in, overfamiliar or banal media surroundings. In collaborative and individual projects, students will create visual compositions on online platforms such as NewHive and explore social media interventions, Twitter experiments, crowdsourced work, collections of online found imagery, supercuts, GIFs, and "choose your own adventure"- style online storytelling.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Odell, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 177: Video Art I

Students create experimental video works. Conceptual, formal, and performance-based approaches to the medium. The history of video art since the 70s and its influences including experimental film, television, minimalism, conceptual art, and performance and electronic art. Topics: camera technique, lighting, sound design, found footage, cinematic conventions, and nonlinear digital editing. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 178: Art and Electronics

Analog electronics and their use in art. Basic circuits for creating mobile, illuminated, and responsive works of art. Topics: soldering; construction of basic circuits; elementary electronics theory; and contemporary electronic art. (lower level)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ulfeldt, A. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 179: Digital Art I

Contemporary electronic art focusing on digital media. Students create works exploring two- and three-dimensional, and time-based uses of the computer in fine art. History and theoretical underpinnings. Common discourse and informative resources for material and inspiration. Topics: imaging and sound software, web art, and rethinking the comptuer as interface and object. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Odell, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 180: Color (TAPS 180P)

Hands-on study of color to develop color sensitivity and the ability to manipulate color to exploit its expressive potential. Guided experimentation and observation. Topics include color relativity, color and light, color mixing, color harmony, and color and content. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 239: Intermedia Workshop (MUSIC 155, MUSIC 255)

Students develop and produce intermedia works. Musical and visual approaches to the conceptualisation and shaping of time-based art. Exploration of sound and image relationship. Study of a wide spectrum of audiovisual practices including experimental animation, video art, dance, performance, non-narrative forms, interactive art and installation art. Focus on works that use music/sound and image as equal partners. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: consent of instructors, and one of FILMPROD 114, ARTSTUDI 131, 138, 167, 177, 179, or MUSIC 123, or equivalent. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 252: Sculpture II

Builds upon 151. Installation and non-studio pieces. Impact of material and technique upon form and content; the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Historical and contemporary forming methods provide a theoretical basis for the studio work. Field trips; guest lecturers. (upper level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 253: ECOLOGY OF MATERIALS

Advanced studio-based sculpture course. Artists concerned with environmental impact and the interconnection of art with other fields. Students will take a critical look at the materials used in sculpture, in relation to environmental concerns, and the impact of material and technique upon form and content; therefore understanding the physical, expressive and environmental possibilities of diverse materials. Conceptual and technical considerations. Group discussions, critiques, readings, video presentations, a field trip to a local artist-in-residence program, and visiting lecturers.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 254: Kinetic Sculpture

This course is focused on developing a practical, hands on understanding of kinetic mechanisms applied to objects and materials in sculpture and installation. Class time will take the form of lectures and technical demos, and hands-on labs where you will be exposed to different strategies for making movement in the physical world. Topics investigated include Rube Goldberg machines, devices of wonder, interactivity, audience experience and participation. This course will not be co-taught this year.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berlier, T. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 264: Advanced Interaction Design

This upper level studio course will continue and create a sustained investigation into designed interactivity in real space. Students will create interactive installations, or public interventions using sensors or other computational devices. Prerequisites include one of the following - Embodied Interfaces, Media Archaeologies, Making it with Arduino, Digital Art 1, Electronic Art or permission of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Holberton, R. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 266: Sculptural Screens / Malleable Media

In this upper level studio course, students will experiment with video and computational outputs embedded in physical scenarios. What new physical formats are made possible by contemporary screen and projection-mapping technologies? How can we make expressive use of LCD screens, pico projectors, i-pad arrays, and LEDs? The class will address the screen as sculptural medium by examining established artists like Nam June Paik, Michael Snow, Tony Oursler, and Pippilotti Rist, as well as exploring emerging contemporary artists tackling this medium. Prerequisites include one of the following: Intro to Digital/Physical Design, Embodied Interfaces, Media Archaeologies, Making it with Arduino, Digital Art 1, Electronic Art or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Baugh-Sasaki, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 270: Advanced Photography Seminar

Students engage in professional photographic (studio) practices that prepare them to apply and extend the skills, methods and techniques they have learned in previous courses, including digital and analog shooting with digital print production. These practices involve working collaboratively, taking on short-term projects, handling an increased media work flow, actively participating in regular critiques, and contributing to and showing work in a small final exhibition. Students refine their aesthetic, tap the interdisciplinary network of influences they have built, and work independently to become adept at presenting their ideas and developing a portfolio to show the art they have produced to potential clients in a 'real world' professional context. This course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ARTSTUDI 275, ARTSTUDI 278, or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Calm, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 271: The View Camera

Students will learn how to use large-format 4x5 view cameras, and explore the ways in which large-format photography enables the creation of exceptionally clear images on a par with digital imaging. They will develop sheet film and print black-and-white images in analog format. To connect the camera to contemporary digital practices students will learn to scan and digitally print from their negatives. Specific attention will be given to mastering perspective control and in-camera manipulation of the image. From a historical point of view, the course will analyze and discuss images created with view cameras by a wide range of artists from the early days of photography to the present. Students will put their skills into practice and pursue their own aesthetic by producing a portfolio of images. Prerequisite: ARTSTUDI 170, ARTSTUDI 171, or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Felzmann, L. (PI)

ASNAMST 91A: ASIAN-AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY/W (ENGLISH 91A)

This is a dual purpose class: a writing workshop in which you will generate autobiographical vignettes/essays as well as a reading seminar featuring prose from a wide range of contemporary Asian-American writers. Some of the many questions we will consider are: What exactly is `Asian-American memoir? Are there salient subjects and tropes that define the literature? And in what ways do our writerly interactions both resistant and assimilative with a predominantly non-Asian context in turn recreate that context? We'll be working/experimenting with various modes of telling, including personal essay, the epistolary form, verse, and even fictional scenarios.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, C. (PI)

ASNAMST 144: Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class (CSRE 144, FEMGEN 144X)

Exploration of crossing borders within ourselves, and between us and them, based on a belief that understanding the self leads to understanding others. How personal identity struggles have meaning beyond the individual, how self healing can lead to community healing, how the personal is political, and how artistic self expression based in self understanding can address social issues. The tensions of victimization and agency, contemplation and action, humanities and science, embracing knowledge that comes from the heart as well as the mind. Studies are founded in synergistic consciousness as movement toward meaning, balance, connectedness, and wholeness. Engaging these questions through group process, journaling, reading, drama, creative writing, and storytelling. Study is academic and self-reflective, with an emphasis on developing and presenting creative works in various media that express identity development across borders.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 7N: Introduction to Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McConnell, S. (PI)

BIO 53: Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects. This course is identical to Bio 7N, so students enrolled in the former should not take this course. Open to undergraduates and graduate students. Students must have access to a DSLR camera and lenses - we can accept up to 20 students who can share 10 course-provided cameras and lenses, by application.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McConnell, S. (PI)

BIO 196B: Biology Senior Reflection

Capstone course series for seniors. Creative, self-reflective and scientifically relevant projects conceived, produced and exhibited over the course of three quarters. Explore scientific content of personal interest through creative forms including but not limited to writing, music, fine arts, performing arts, photography, film or new media. A written essay on the creative process and scientific significance of the selected topic will accompany the creative work. Completed projects may be included in a creative portfolio. Required enrollment in 196A,B,C.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 196C: Biology Senior Reflection

Capstone course series for seniors. Creative, self-reflective and scientifically relevant projects conceived, produced and exhibited over the course of three quarters. Explore scientific content of personal interest through creative forms including but not limited to writing, music, fine arts, performing arts, photography, film or new media. A written essay on the creative process and scientific significance of the selected topic will accompany the creative work. Completed projects may be included in a creative portfolio. Required enrollment in 196A,B,C.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 70Q: Medical Device Innovation

BIOE 70Q invites students to apply design thinking to the creation of healthcare technologies. Students will learn about the variety of factors that shape healthcare innovation, and through hands-on design projects, invent their own solutions to clinical needs. Guest instructors will include engineers, doctors, entrepreneurs, and others who have helped bring ideas from concept to clinical use.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 31: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to Architectural Design and CEE majors; others by consent of instructor. Drawing architecture to probe the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wood, E. (PI)

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Barton, J. (PI); Lin, D. (GP)

CEE 32A: Psychology of Architecture

This course argues that architecture often neglects the interdisciplinary investigation of our internal psychological experience and the way it impacts our creation of space. How does our inner life influence external design? How are we impacted emotionally, physically, psychologically by the spaces we inhabit day to day? How might we intentionally imbue personal and public spaces with specific emotions? This seminar serves as a call to action for students interested in approaching architecture with a holistic understanding of the emotional impact of space. Sample topics addressed will include: conscious vs. unconscious design; the ego of architecture; psycho-spatial perspectives; ideas of home; integral/holistic architecture; phenomenology of inner and outer spaces; exploring archetypal architecture; and translating emotion through environment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 130: Architectural Design: 3-D Modeling, Methodology, and Process

Preference to Architectural Design majors; others by consent of instructor. Projects investigate conceptual approaches to the design of key architectural elements, such as wall and roof. Functional and structural considerations. Focus is on constructing 3-D models in a range of materials; 3-D computer modeling. Students keep a graphic account of the evolution of their design process. Final project entails design of a simple structure. Limited enrollment. Pre- or corequisite: CEE 31 or 31Q.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 131D: Urban Design Studio (URBANST 171)

The practical application of urban design theory. Projects focus on designing neighborhood and downtown regions to balance livability, revitalization, population growth, and historic preservation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Glanz, D. (PI)

CLASSICS 16N: Sappho: Erotic Poetess of Lesbos (FEMGEN 24N)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 24N.) Preference to freshmen. Sappho's surviving fragments in English; traditions referring to or fantasizing about her disputed life. How her poetry and legend inspired women authors and male poets such as Swinburne, Baudelaire, and Pound. Paintings inspired by Sappho in ancient and modern times, and composers who put her poetry to music.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Peponi, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 19N: Eloquence Personified: How To Speak Like Cicero

This course is an introduction to Roman rhetoric, Cicero's Rome, and the active practice of speaking well. Participants read a short rhetorical treatise by Cicero, analyze one of his speeches as well as more recent ones by, e.g., Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr., and Obama, and watch their oratorical performances. During the remainder of the term they practice rhetoric, prepare and deliver in class two (short) speeches, and write an essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Krebs, C. (PI)

COMM 104W: Reporting, Writing, and Understanding the News

Techniques of news reporting and writing. The value and role of news in democratic societies. Gateway class to journalism. Prerequisite for all COMM 177/277 classes. Limited enrollment. Preference to COMM majors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 171: Moving Pictures: Video Journalism for mobile and social platforms (COMM 271)

(Graduate students register for 271.) Examine video journalism¿s crucial role in digital news media across mobile and social media platforms. What are the specific needs of mobile platforms? How is new technology utilized to produce effective video news content? We'll examine case studies and hear from guest speakers about innovations in video journalism. Students produce short video journalism pieces using mobile tools, optimized for viewing on mobile devices. Prerequisite: Journalism MA student or instructor's consent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Migielicz, G. (PI)

COMM 176: Advanced Digital Media Production (COMM 276)

In-depth reporting and production using audio, images and video. Focus on an in-depth journalism project with appropriate uses of digital media: audio, photography, graphics, and video. Topics include advanced field techniques and approaches (audio, video, still) and emphasis on creating a non-fiction narrative arc in a multimedia piece of 10-12 minutes. Prerequisite: COMM 275 or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Migielicz, G. (PI)

COMM 177D: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Narrative Journalism (COMM 277D)

(Graduate students register for COMM 277D.) How to report, write, edit, and read long-form narrative nonfiction, whether for magazines, news sites or online venues. Tools and templates of story telling such as scenes, characters, dialogue, and narrative arc. How the best long-form narrative stories defy or subvert conventional wisdom and bring fresh light to the human experience through reporting, writing, and moral passion. Prerequisite: 104 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 177S: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Sports Journalism (COMM 277S)

(Graduate students register for COMM 277S.) Workshop. An examination of American sports writing from the 1920's Golden Age of Sports to present. Students become practitioners of the sports writing craft in an intensive laboratory. Hones journalistic skills such as specialized reporting, interviewing, deadline writing, creation of video projects, and conceptualizing and developing stories for print and online. Prerequisite: 104 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pomerantz, G. (PI)

COMM 177Y: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Foreign Correspondence (COMM 277Y)

(Graduate students register for COMM 277Y.) Study how being a foreign correspondent has evolved and blend new communication tools with clear narrative to tell stories from abroad in a way that engages a diversifying American audience in the digital age. Prerequisite: COMM 104W, COMM 279, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zacharia, J. (PI)

COMPLIT 127B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (JEWISHST 147B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shemtov, V. (PI)

CS 45N: Computers and Photography: From Capture to Sharing

Preference to freshmen with experience in photography and use of computers. Elements of photography, such as lighting, focus, depth of field, aperture, and composition. How a photographer makes photos available for computer viewing, reliably stores them, organizes them, tags them, searches them, and distributes them online. No programming experience required. Digital SLRs and editing software will be provided to those students who do not wish to use their own.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Garcia-Molina, H. (PI)

CS 83: Playback Theater For Research

Playback combines elements of theater, community work and storytelling. In a playback show, a group of actors and musicians create an improvised performance based on the audience's personal stories. A playback show brings about a powerful listening and sharing experience. During the course, we will tell, listen, play together, and train in playback techniques. We will write diaries to process our experience in the context of education and research. The course is aimed to strengthen listening abilities, creativity and the collaborative spirit, all integral parts of doing great science. In playback, as in research, we are alwaysnmoving together, from the known, to the unknown, and back.nThere is limited enrollment for this class. Application is required. Apply here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1gR4bGkFZh_ycMBGMz1AIIuyv7WyQfX5xTjanGlclK-A/prefill
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reingold, O. (PI)

CS 148: Introduction to Computer Graphics and Imaging

Introductory prerequisite course in the computer graphics sequence introducing students to the technical concepts behind creating synthetic computer generated images. Focuses on using OpenGL to create visual imagery, as well as an understanding of the underlying mathematical concepts including triangles, normals, interpolation, texture mapping, bump mapping, etc. Course will cover fundamental understanding of light and color, as well as how it impacts computer displays and printers. Class will discuss more thoroughly how light interacts with the environment, constructing engineering models such as the BRDF, plus various simplifications into more basic lighting and shading models. Also covers ray tracing technology for creating virtual images, while drawing parallels between ray tracers and real world cameras to illustrate various concepts. Anti-aliasing and acceleration structures are also discussed. The final class mini-project consists of building out a ray tracer to create visually compelling images. Starter codes and code bits will be provided to aid in development, but this class focuses on what you can do with the code as opposed to what the code itself looks like. Therefore grading is weighted toward in person "demos" of the code in action - creativity and the production of impressive visual imagery are highly encouraged. Prerequisites: CS 107, MATH 51.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 170: Stanford Laptop Orchestra: Composition, Coding, and Performance (MUSIC 128)

Classroom instantiation of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra (SLOrk) which includes public performances. An ensemble of more than 20 humans, laptops, controllers, and special speaker arrays designed to provide each computer-mediated instrument with its sonic identity and presence. Topics and activities include issues of composing for laptop orchestras, instrument design, sound synthesis, programming, and live performance. May be repeated four times for credit. Space is limited; see https://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/128 for information about the application and enrollment process. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, G. (PI)

CSRE 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hodge, C. (PI)

CSRE 141E: Counterstory and Narrative Inquiry in Literature and Education (EDUC 141, EDUC 341, LIFE 124)

Counterstory is a method developed in critical legal studies that emerges out of the broad "narrative turn" in the humanities and social science. This course explores the value of this turn, especially for marginalized communities, and the use of counterstory as analysis, critique, and self-expression. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we examine counterstory as it has developed in critical theory, critical pedagogy, and critical race theory literatures, and explore it as a framework for liberation, cultural work, and spiritual exploration.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 144: Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class (ASNAMST 144, FEMGEN 144X)

Exploration of crossing borders within ourselves, and between us and them, based on a belief that understanding the self leads to understanding others. How personal identity struggles have meaning beyond the individual, how self healing can lead to community healing, how the personal is political, and how artistic self expression based in self understanding can address social issues. The tensions of victimization and agency, contemplation and action, humanities and science, embracing knowledge that comes from the heart as well as the mind. Studies are founded in synergistic consciousness as movement toward meaning, balance, connectedness, and wholeness. Engaging these questions through group process, journaling, reading, drama, creative writing, and storytelling. Study is academic and self-reflective, with an emphasis on developing and presenting creative works in various media that express identity development across borders.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 156T: Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson (AFRICAAM 156, TAPS 156, TAPS 356)

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 177: Dramatic Writing: The Fundamentals (FEMGEN 177, TAPS 177, TAPS 277)

Course introduces students to the basic elements of playwriting and creative experimentation for the stage. Topics include: character development, conflict and plot construction, staging and setting, and play structure. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Marsha Norman, Patrick Shanley, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Paula Vogel, Octavio Solis and others. Table readings of one-act length work required by quarter's end.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 178B: Intensive Playwriting (TAPS 178B, TAPS 278)

Intermediate level study of fundamentals of playwriting through an intensive play development process. Course emphasizes visual scripting for the stage and play revision. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Suzan-Lori Parks, Tony Kushner, Adrienne Kennedy, Edward Albee, Maria Irene Fornes and others. Table readings of full length work required by quarter¿s end.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DANCE 1: Introduction to Contemporary Dance & Movement: Liquid Flow

Students in Liquid Flow will participate in a dance and movement class that 1) teaches the fundamentals of dance technique, and 2) addresses the way that you already dance in the world. Through discovering your own DIY movement signature and being aware of one another's dance, motion, and energy in space, we will transform the way that we move and connect to one another to inhabit flow states from the dance studio, into everyday life, and ultimately onto the stage. nAccompanied by contemporary and live music, Students will develop articulation, flexibility and "grace", learn contemporary and classic dance vocabulary, gain freedom dancing with others and mine dance's potential for social transformation and connection. Designed for beginners, we welcome student movers from diverse dance traditions, non-dancers, athletes, and more advanced dancers, who desire fluidity in their daily life, from thought to action.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 2: Introduction to Dance & Movement: Afro Flows

Students in Afro Flows will focus on fundamentals of contemporary dance, gain fluid movement in everyday life and develop a rhythmic sensibility. This class invites participants to be more expressive and spontaneous in their movement choices. In addition to set movement warm ups, students will also learn footwork from different traditions, including tap and current social dance styles to expand their dance vocabulary. Through this approach and live percussion, students will discover their own natural rhythmic capability, as well as learn to attune with the environment and with others. No previous is experience required. Questions? Contact: Aleta Hayes (ahayes1@stanford.edu)
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 27: Faculty Choreography

Creation, rehearsal, performance of faculty choreography. Casting by audition/invitation, first week of the quarter. For detailed project descriptions and full rehearsal/performance schedules, contact choreographers directly. New Work by Diane Frank. Rehearsals Mon / Wed, 6-8:30 pm. This group work investigates literal and imaginative tools -- objects, memories, movement fragments, gestures, advice -- used to find or create the extraordinary within the ordinary tasks and times of our lives. Rehearsals culminate in 3 TAPS Main Stage performances on shared dance faculty concert, end of week 9.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Frank, D. (PI)

DANCE 30: Chocolate Heads Performance Project: Dance & Intercultural Performance Creation (AFRICAAM 37)

Students from diverse dance styles (ballet to hip-hop to contemporary) participate in the dance-making/remix process and collaborate with musicians, visual artists, designers and spoken word artists, to co-create a multidisciplinary finished production and installation. Students of all dance or athletic backgrounds are welcome to audition on Wednesday, September 28th and Monday, October 4th during class time. Visual artists, musicians and dancers may also contact the instructor for further information at ahayes1@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 45: Dance Improv StratLab: Freestyle Improvisation from Contemporary to Hip Hop & Beyond (AFRICAAM 45)

This class is an arena for physical and artistic exploration to fire the imagination of dance improvisers, cultivate sensation and perception within and without studio practice and to promote interactive intelligence.nStudents will learn to harness and transform habitual movement patterns and dance trainings as resources for new ways of moving: expand their awareness of being a part of a bigger picture, while being attentive to everything all at once: and to use visual, aural and kinesthetic responses to convert those impulses into artistic material. Class will be accompanied by live and recorded music and include weekly jam sessions. Open to students from all dance, movement, athletic backgrounds and skill levels. Beginners welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 46: Social Dance I

Introduction to non-competitive social ballroom dance. The partner dances found in today's popular culture include 3 kinds of swing, 3 forms of waltz, tango, salsa, cha-cha and nightclub two-step. The course also includes tips for great partnering, enhancing creativity, developing personal style, stress reduction, musicality, and the ability to adapt to changing situations. The emphasis on comfort, partnering and flexibility enables students to dance with partners whose experience comes from any dance tradition.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 48: Beginning Ballet

Fundametals of ballet technique including posture, placement, the foundation steps, and ballet terms; emphasis on the development of coordination, balance, flexibility, sense of lines, and sensitivity to rhythm and music. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pankevich, A. (PI)

DANCE 50: Contemporary Choreography

Each day Ketley will develop a new phrase of choreography with the students and use this as the platform for investigation. Consistent lines of inquiry include; sculpting with the body as an emotional, instinctual, and graphic landscape, how the fracturing and the complication of strands of information can feel generative of new ways of moving, discussions around how our use of time is directly correlated to our sense of presence, and the multitude of physical colors available to each of us as artists as we expand our curiosity about movement. Classes will be very physical, trusting that much of our knowledge is contained in the body. For questions please e-mail aketley@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 58: Beginning Hip Hop

Steps and styling in one of America's 21st-century vernacular dance forms. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reddick, R. (PI)

DANCE 59: Intermediate-Advanced Hip-Hop

Steps and styling in one of America's 21st-century vernacular dance forms. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reddick, R. (PI)

DANCE 100: Dance, Movement and Medicine: Immersion in Dance for PD (NENS 222)

Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance class for people with PD. This Community Engaged Learning component provides opportunity to engage meaningfully with people in the PD community. Dancing together weekly, students will experience firsthand the embodied signature values of "Dance for PD" classes: full inclusion, embodied presence, aesthetic and expressive opportunity for creative engagement, and community-building in action. A weekly debriefing session within Friday's class time will allow students to integrate seminar material with their movement experiences.nnNO PRE-REQUISITES: No prior dance experience required. Beginners are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DANCE 102: Musical Theater Dance Styles (MUSIC 184E)

Students will be able to demonstrate period specificity, character of style through learning different musical theater dances from the early 20th C.to the present. ALL students will participate in an end of quarter showing of the choreography developed and composed in class. nClass will be supplemented with the occasional guest, DJ accompaniment and video viewing.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 108: Hip Hop Meets Broadway

What happens when Hip Hop meets "Fosse", "Aida", "Dream Girls" and "In the Heights"?nThe most amazing collaboration of Hip Hop styles adapted to some of the most memorable Broadway Productions.nThis class will explore the realm between Hip Hop Dance and the Broadway Stage. Infusing Acting thru dance movement and exploring the Art of Lip Sync thru Hip Hop Dance styles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reddick, R. (PI)

DANCE 123: Hot Mess: Deliberate Failure as Practice

A dance class in how we become the worst dancer possible. The foundation of this class has many parts. One is that, in almost every respect the way we gain insight into anything is to understand more clearly its polarity. As a class we purposely explore chaos, failure, and "bad" dancing, with the hope that then we will have a greater chance to understand and refine our personal notions around beauty. The class also acknowledges that creativity is at times born from the loss of control. Instead of looking at this idea obliquely, Hot Mess looks at this directly by having dancers confront a number of movement and vocal prompts that are literally impossible to execute in any good way. This class embraces and celebrates destabilization, with all the exuberance, fear, and learning that can happen when we accept and practice being lost.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 131: Beginning/Intermediate Ballet

Structured studio practice reviewing the basics of ballet technique including posture, placement, the foundation steps and ballet terms, and progressing to more complex positions and combination of steps. Emphasis is placed on improving forms, developing coordination and connectivity, securing balance, increasing strength, flexibility, sense of lines, and sensitivity to rhythm and music.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pankevich, A. (PI)

DANCE 141: Advanced Contemporary Modern Technique

This advanced dance technique class is grounded in the technical training, aesthetics, and choreographic processes of Merce Cunningham, American dancer and master choreographer. Practice will increase strength, speed, articulation, amplitude and clarity of dancing. Class will provide a solid technical base applicable to other forms of dancing. Dancers must be ready to work at a high intermediate/advanced level to enroll. Short readings and concert attendance will supplement studio work. Cunningham-based technique is particularly well-suited to dancers with prior training in ballet; dancers with prior training in any form are welcome. nMay be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Frank, D. (PI)

DANCE 142: Intermediate/Advanced Contemporary Dance Technique

This intermediate/advanced dance technique class is grounded in the technical training, aesthetic sensibilities, and choreographic processes of Merce Cunningham, American dancer/master choreographer. This studio work at an intermediate/advanced level will build technical strength, speed, line, and rhythmic acuity/musicality and amplitude in dancing. The class will provides solid technical training useful and applicable to other forms of dancing. Dancers must be ready to work at an intermediate/advanced level to enroll. Studio practice will be supplemented by readings, video viewing, concert attendance, and participation in special workshops with guest artists. Though Cunningham-based dance technique is particularly well-suited to dancers with prior training in ballet, dancers with prior training in all forms of dance are welcome and strongly encouraged to enroll. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Frank, D. (PI)

DANCE 146: Social Dance II

Intermediate non-competitive social ballroom dance. The partner dances found in today's popular culture include Lindy hop, Viennese waltz, hustle, traveling foxtrot, plus intermediate/advanced levels of cross-step waltz and nightclub two-step. The course continues further tips for great partnering, enhancing creativity, developing personal style, stress reduction, musicality, and the ability to adapt to changing situations. Prerequisite: Dance 46.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 147: Living Traditions of Swing

Swing dancing: the early Lindy of the 1920s; 6- and 8-count Lindy hop, Shag, Big Apple, 1950s Rock 'n' Roll swing, disco Hustle and West Coast Swing. Partnering and improvisation. Swing's crosscultural influences and personal creativity. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 149: Advanced Ballet

Advanced Ballet at Stanford is offered for students who are interested in rigorous, complex, and artistically compelling ballet training. The class focuses on technique, but in the broad sense of how ballet as a movement system can be used for a wide range of dance disciplines. The class honors the historical training legacy that defines classical ballet, but is in no way shackled to that history in an antiquated fashion. The students are encouraged to explore the form as artists, to question its foundations, and find their own sense of agency within classical dance. Students with a strong background in ballet are encouraged to come, but also students with less ballet training are welcome as long as they have an email dialog with the lecturer beforehand. Any questions can be directed to Lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 156: Social Dance III

Intermediate non-competitive social ballroom dance: intermediate/advanced waltz, redowa, Bohemian National Polka, intermediate/advanced tango, cha-cha, and salsa. The course continues further tips for great partnering, enhancing creativity, developing personal style, stress reduction, musicality, and the ability to adapt to changing situations.Prerequisite: Dance 46. Dance 156 may immediately follow Dance 46.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powers, R. (PI)

DLCL 111Q: Spanish-English Literary Translation Workshop (ILAC 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practicalnskills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English andnEnglish to Spanish. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies,nand semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translationnin the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological andnsocio-cultural forces that shape translations. Students will workshop andnrevise an original translation project throughout the quarter.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

DLCL 113Q: Borges and Translation (ILAC 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Santana, C. (PI)

DLCL 121: Performing the Middle Ages

Through an analysis of medieval courtly love, religious, satirical, and Crusade lyrics, we will study the rise of a new subjectivity; the female voice; the roles of poet, audience, and patron; oral and manuscript transmission; and political propaganda. Special attention will be given to performance as a reimagining of self and social identity. Authors include Bertran de Born, Marie de France, Hildegard von Bingen, Walther von der Vogelweide, Dante, and Chaucer. Students will have the opportunity to produce a creative project that brings medieval ideas about performance into dialogue with modern conceptions. Taught in English, all texts in translation. NOTE: for AY 2017-18 FRENCH 205 Songs of Love and War: Gender, Crusade, Politics counts for DLCL 121.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 123: Medieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture (ARTHIST 105B, ARTHIST 305B)

The course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages in particular the art and architecture of the period. The Middle Ages is presented as a network of global economies, fueled by a desire for natural resources, access to luxury goods and holy sites. We will study a large geographical area encompassing the British Isles, Europe, the Mediterranean, Central Asia, India, and East Africa and trace the connectivity of these lands in economic, political, religious, and artistic terms from the fourth to the fourteenth century C.E. The students will have two lectures and one discussion session per week. Depending on the size of the class, it is possible that a graduate student TA will run the discussion session. Our goal is to give a skills-oriented approach to the Middle Ages and to engage students in creative projects that will satisfy 1. Ways-Creative Expression requirement as well as one of the following two: Ways-Analytical Interpretive or Ways-Engaging Difference.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 239: Borges and Translation

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DLCL 293: Literary Translation (ENGLISH 293)

An overview of translation theories and practices over time. The aesthetic, ethical, and political questions raised by the act and art of translation and how these pertain to the translator's tasks. Discussion of particular translation challenges and the decision processes taken to address these issues. Coursework includes assigned theoretical readings, comparative translations, and the undertaking of an individual translation project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Santana, C. (PI)

EARTHSYS 149: Wild Writing (EARTHSYS 249)

What is wilderness and why does it matter? In this course we will interrogate answers to this question articulated by influential and diverse American environmental thinkers of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, who through their writing transformed public perceptions of wilderness and inspired such actions as the founding of the National Park System, the passage of the Wilderness Act and the Clean Air and Water Acts, the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the birth of the environmental and climate justice movements. Students will also develop their own responses to the question of what is wilderness and why it matters through a series of writing exercises that integrate personal narrative, wilderness experience, and environmental scholarship, culminating in a ~3000 word narrative nonfiction essay. This course will provide students with knowledge, tools, experience, and skills that will empower them to become more persuasive environmental storytellers and advocates.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Nevle, R. (PI); Polk, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 154: Intermediate Writing: Communicating Climate Change: Navigating the Stories from the Frontlines (PWR 91EP)

In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will write and submit their article for publication.nnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 187: FEED the Change: Redesigning Food Systems

FEED the Change is a project-based course focused on solving real problems in the food system. Targeted at upper-class undergraduates, this course provides an opportunity for students to meet and work with thought-leading innovators, to gain meaningful field experience, and to develop connections with faculty, students, and others working to create impact in the food system. Students in the course will develop creative confidence by learning and using the basic principles and methodologies of human-centered design, storytelling, and media design. Students will also learn basic tools for working effectively in teams and for analyzing complex social systems. FEED the Change is taught at the d.school and is offered through the FEED Collaborative in the School of Earth. This class requires an application. For application information and more information about our work and about past class projects, please visit our website at http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 200: Environmental Communication in Action: The SAGE Project

This course is focused on writing about sustainability for a public audience through an ongoing project, SAGE (Sound Advice for a Green Earth), that is published by Stanford Magazine. Students contribute to SAGE, an eco advice column, by choosing, researching, and answering questions about sustainable living submitted by Stanford alumni and the general public. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement).
Terms: not given next year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 141: Counterstory and Narrative Inquiry in Literature and Education (CSRE 141E, EDUC 341, LIFE 124)

Counterstory is a method developed in critical legal studies that emerges out of the broad "narrative turn" in the humanities and social science. This course explores the value of this turn, especially for marginalized communities, and the use of counterstory as analysis, critique, and self-expression. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we examine counterstory as it has developed in critical theory, critical pedagogy, and critical race theory literatures, and explore it as a framework for liberation, cultural work, and spiritual exploration.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 9CE: Creative Expression in Writing

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 9CT: Special Topics in Creative Expression

Focus on a particular topic or process of creative expression. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only. May repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 9CV: Creative Expression in Writing

Online workshop whose primary focus is to give students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 11AX: Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Storytelling in the Arts

When we look closely at a photograph or painting, a story emerges, but how do we begin to interpret the meaning of that story without narration or passing time? When we listen to music or watch a ballet, we have a sense of emotion and drama, but why? And how has the artist created such things for us?<br><br> These questions have great resonance for the fiction writer, who must generate from the most basic tool all the necessities of the short story: drama, character, setting, emotion, and lyricism. In order to write more affecting and beautiful stories, this course will ask us to explore beyond the literary, into the world of the visual and performing arts. We will pair short stories with paintings, films, songs, and performances. As we learn the many ways stories are told and experienced, we will bring these insights into our own work through prompted exercises, improv, games, collaboration, workshop, and revision. In addition to exercises, vignettes, and sketches, each student will complete a short story and have that story critiqued by both her peers and the instructor. Our primary aim in this class will be to make writing a daily practice that considers the work and value of art generally and in that way to take risks, succeed, reflect, revise, fail, and recover from failure.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pufahl, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 48N: The American Songbook and Love Poetry (AMSTUD 48N)

A study of performances (Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra etc) of songs by classic American composers (Porter, Rogers and Hart, Cohen).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fields, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 90: Fiction Writing

The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 90Q: Sports Writing

Study and practice of the unique narratives, tropes, images and arguments that creative writers develop when they write about popular sport. From regional fandom to individualist adventuring, boxing and baseball to mascot dancing and table tennis, exceptional creative writers mine from a diversity of leisure activity a rich vein of ¿sports writing¿ in the creative nonfiction genre. In doing so, they demonstrate the creative and formal adaptability required to write with excellence about any subject matter, and under the circumstances of any subjectivity. Discussion of the ways in which writers have framed, and even critiqued, our interest in athletic events, spectatorship, and athletic beauty. Writers include Joyce Carol Oates, Roland Barthes, David James Duncan, Arnold Rampersad, John Updike, Maxine Kumin, Susan Sterling, Ernest Hemingway, Norman Mailer, Dervla Murphy, Haruki Murakami, Don DeLillo, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Annie Dillard, John McPhee, and Laura Hillenbrand. Close readings of essays on form and sport, as well as book excerpts. Students will engage in class discussions and write short weekly papers, leading to a more comprehensive project at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Evans, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 90V: Fiction Writing

Online workshop course that explores the ways in which writers of fiction have used language to examine the world, to create compelling characters, and to move readers. We will begin by studying a selection of stories that demonstrate the many techniques writers use to create fictional worlds; we'll use these stories as models for writing exercises and short assignments, leading to a full story draft. We will study figurative language, character and setting development, and dramatic structure, among other elements of story craft. Then, each student will submit a full draft and receive feedback from the instructor and his/her classmates. This course is taught entirely online, but retains the feel of a traditional classroom. Optional synchronous elements such as discussion and virtual office hours provide the student direct interaction with both the instructor and his/her classmates. Feedback on written work ¿ both offered to and given by the student ¿ is essential to the course and creates class rapport.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 91: Creative Nonfiction

Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 91A: ASIAN-AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY/W (ASNAMST 91A)

This is a dual purpose class: a writing workshop in which you will generate autobiographical vignettes/essays as well as a reading seminar featuring prose from a wide range of contemporary Asian-American writers. Some of the many questions we will consider are: What exactly is `Asian-American memoir? Are there salient subjects and tropes that define the literature? And in what ways do our writerly interactions both resistant and assimilative with a predominantly non-Asian context in turn recreate that context? We'll be working/experimenting with various modes of telling, including personal essay, the epistolary form, verse, and even fictional scenarios.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, C. (PI)

ENGLISH 92: Reading and Writing Poetry

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 93Q: The American Road Trip

From Whitman to Kerouac, Alec Soth to Georgia O¿Keeffe, the lure of travel has inspired many American artists to pack up their bags and hit the open road. In this course we will be exploring the art and literature of the great American road trip. We will be reading and writing in a variety of genres, workshopping our own personal projects, and considering a wide breadth of narrative approaches. Assignments will range from reading Cormac McCarthy¿s novel, The Road, to listening to Bob Dylan¿s album, ¿Highway 61 Revisited.¿ We will be looking at films like Badlands and Thelma and Louise,¿acquainting ourselves with contemporary photographers, going on a number of campus-wide field trips, and finishing the quarter with an actual road trip down the California coast. Anyone with a sense of adventure is welcome!
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carlson-Wee, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 94: Creative Writing Across Genres

For minors in creative writing. The forms and conventions of the contemporary short story and poem. How form, technique, and content combine to make stories and poems organic. Prerequisite: 90, 91, or 92.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 151F: Angelheaded Hipsters: Beat Writers of San Francisco and New York

Reading of central writers of the Beat movement (Ginsberg, Kerouac, di Prima, Snyder, Whalen) as well as some related writers (Creeley, Gunn, Levertov). Issues explored include NY and SF, Buddhism and leftist politics, poetry and jazz. Some exposure to reading poems to jazz accompaniment. Examination of some of the writers and performers growing out of the Beats: Bob Dylan, rock music, especially from San Francisco, and jazz.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fields, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 166: Who were the Vikings?

Who were the Vikings and what has been their influence on contemporary culture? This course provides a broad introduction to Viking society and culture as well as to their legacy in the modern world. We will look at Viking life, mythology, literature, art and archaeology as well as modern adaptations of Viking culture in music, literature, film and television. We will read some of the great works of Viking literature ¿ tales of Odin and Thor, of magic and monsters, of adventures across the seas - and examine online exhibitions of Vikings artefacts and settlements in Europe and Newfoundland. During the first half of the course, students will begin thinking about their final project ¿ a creative reimagining one of the texts or artefacts which we will discuss in class. The latter half of the course will focus on the development of the Vikings as a cultural model for modern creative expression. We will investigate how Norse themes, characters and forms were adapted in Germany, England and the USA in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by writers, artists and composers such as Richard Wagner, William Morris, Henry Longfellow and J.R.R. Tolkien. The course will conclude with a discussion of how the Vikings (and Viking ideas) are represented today in popular culture, including the 1958 Kirk Douglas film, ¿the Vikings¿, the TV shows ¿The Vikings¿ and ¿Game of Thrones¿ and the Marvel comic books series. Students will be encouraged to examine the ways in which these texts engage with their historical models and consider how this might influence their own creative project.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 190: Intermediate Fiction Writing

May be taken twice for credit. Lottery. Priority to last quarter/year in school, majors in English with Creative Writing emphasis, and Creative Writing minors. Prerequisite: 90 or 91.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 190D: Dialogue Writing

For Fiction and Film students. Study how dialogue develops character, reveals information, moves plots forward, and creates tension. Use of short story, novels, graphic novels, and films. Students will write many short assignments, one dialogue scene, and one longer story or script (10-20pages). Priority to Fiction Into Film students, but open to all. Prerequisite: 90.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clark, H. (PI)

ENGLISH 190F: Fiction into Film

Workshop. For screenwriting students. Story craft, structure, and dialogue. Assignments include short scene creation, character development, and a long story. How fictional works are adapted to screenplays, and how each form uses elements of conflict, time, summary, and scene. Priority to seniors and Film Studies majors. Prerequisite: 90.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 190T: Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing

Focus on a particular topic or process. Work includes aspects of reading short stories and novels, writing at least 30-50 pages of fiction, and responding to peers' work in workshop. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 191: Intermediate Creative Nonfiction

Continuation of 91. Workshop. The application of advanced storytelling techniques to fact-based personal narratives, emphasizing organic writing, discovering audience, and publication. Guest lecturers, collaborative writing, and publication of the final project in print, audio, or web formats. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 192: Intermediate Poetry Writing

May be taken twice. Lottery. Priority to last quarter/year in school, majors in English with Creative Writing emphasis, and Creative Writing minors. Prerequisite: 92.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 192T: Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing

Generation and discussion of student poems. How to recognize a poem's internal structure; how to seek models for work. Students submit portfolio for group critique. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENGLISH 92.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 195B: How to Write a Great Essay: A Writing Bootcamp for Undergraduates

The course will be a practical workshop for undergraduates on how to improve essay-writing skills. we will focus on the finer points of vocabulary, grammar, mechanics, logic, timing, intellectual precision; how to connect with (and delight) an audience; how to magnify a theme; how to deflect counter-arguments; how to develop your own sophisticated authorial 'style'; how to write sentences (and papers!) your reader will care about and admire and maybe even remember.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Castle, T. (PI)

ENGLISH 290: Advanced Fiction Writing

Workshop critique of original short stories or novel. Prerequisites: manuscript, consent of instructor, and 190-level fiction workshop. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Antopol, M. (PI)

FEMGEN 24N: Sappho: Erotic Poetess of Lesbos (CLASSICS 16N)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 24N.) Preference to freshmen. Sappho's surviving fragments in English; traditions referring to or fantasizing about her disputed life. How her poetry and legend inspired women authors and male poets such as Swinburne, Baudelaire, and Pound. Paintings inspired by Sappho in ancient and modern times, and composers who put her poetry to music.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Peponi, A. (PI)

FEMGEN 144X: Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class (ASNAMST 144, CSRE 144)

Exploration of crossing borders within ourselves, and between us and them, based on a belief that understanding the self leads to understanding others. How personal identity struggles have meaning beyond the individual, how self healing can lead to community healing, how the personal is political, and how artistic self expression based in self understanding can address social issues. The tensions of victimization and agency, contemplation and action, humanities and science, embracing knowledge that comes from the heart as well as the mind. Studies are founded in synergistic consciousness as movement toward meaning, balance, connectedness, and wholeness. Engaging these questions through group process, journaling, reading, drama, creative writing, and storytelling. Study is academic and self-reflective, with an emphasis on developing and presenting creative works in various media that express identity development across borders.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FEMGEN 177: Dramatic Writing: The Fundamentals (CSRE 177, TAPS 177, TAPS 277)

Course introduces students to the basic elements of playwriting and creative experimentation for the stage. Topics include: character development, conflict and plot construction, staging and setting, and play structure. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Marsha Norman, Patrick Shanley, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Paula Vogel, Octavio Solis and others. Table readings of one-act length work required by quarter's end.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FEMGEN 192: Women in French Cinema: 1958- (FILMSTUD 112, FRENCH 192)

Women as objects and subjects of the voyeuristic gaze inherent to cinema. The myth of the feminine idol in French films in historical and cultural context since the New Wave until now. The mythology of stars as the imaginary vehicle that helped France to change from traditional society to modern, culturally mixed nation. The evolution of female characters, roles, actresses, directors in the film industry. Filmmakers include Vadim, Truffaut, Varda, Godard, Ozon, Colline Serreau, Tonie Marshall, Maïwen. Discussion in English; films in French with English subtitles. 3 units, 4 units or 5 units.nNOTE: FILMSTUD students must take this course for 3 units only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alduy, C. (PI)

FILMPROD 12AX: Write and Shoot: Narrative Filmmaking

Write and Shoot: Narrative Filmmaking is a hybrid writing/production course that guides students through the process of completing a 2-3 minute narrative film. Students will write scripts for short fiction films, and then, by filming them, learn to apply the fundamentals of digital video production. Initial classwork will include visual writing exercises, DSLR cinematography instruction, script work, and basic fiction film production. Students will continue on in groups of three to develop, film, edit, and critique 2-3 minute narrative films based on a shared class theme or narrative premise. This course is truly INTENSIVE and requires a significant amount of work (including nights and weekends) outside of class and daily deadlines for submission of creative work.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Green, L. (PI); Tobin, A. (PI)

FILMPROD 101: Screen Writing I: Visual Writing

A writing workshop that is an exploration of visual storytelling. Beginning with visual literacy, the class progresses from basic cinematic techniques through scene exercises to revisions and ultimately to connecting scenes in order to build sequences of script pages. Open to all majors; may substitute for ENGL 190F prerequisite for FP101.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FILMPROD 101T: Writing the Television Pilot

A writing workshop in which students are introduced to the basic structures and genre of television pilots and to writing within the screenwriting/television writing form. Students will develop, outline, and workshop their own original pilot episode and series bible. Serves as a prerequisite for FP104 Intermediate Screenwriting. Enrollment by decision of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Tobin, A. (PI)

FILMPROD 103: Adaptation

A close analysis of film adaptation, using various source materials to examine the demands form makes on content and the creative choices made in adaptation to film. Source materials will include plays, fiction, biography, history, graphic novels, and reference to video games and amusement park rides. A weekly film screening is a requirement of the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Tobin, A. (PI)

FILMPROD 106: Image and Sound: Filmmaking for the Digital Age

Despite the rise of emerging forms like two-minute YouTube videos, six second Vines, or interactive storytelling modules, many core principles of visual storytelling remain unchanged. In this hands-on film production class students will learn a broad set of filmmaking fundamentals (basic history, theory, and practice) and will apply them creating film projects using tools such as iPhones, consumer cameras and FCPX.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Stolakis, K. (PI)

FILMPROD 114: Introduction to Film and Video Production

Hands-on. Techniques of film and video making including conceptualization, visualization, story structure, cinematography, sound recording, and editing. Enrollment limited to 12 students. Priority to junior/senior Film & Media Studies majors.Admission determined on the first day of class.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Green, L. (PI)

FILMSTUD 50Q: The Video Essay: Writing with Video about Film and Media

In this course, we will explore what it means to write with video, and we will learn to make effective and engaging video essays about historical and contemporary audiovisual media. Specifically, we will examine formal, aesthetic, and rhetorical strategies for communicating in the medium of video, and we will conduct a series of hands-on exercises utilizing digital video editing software to construct arguments, analyses, and interpretations of film and other media (including television, video games, and online media). Compared with traditional, text-based engagements, the video essay offers a remarkably direct mode of communicating critical and analytical ideas. In this medium, authors no longer struggle to describe audiovisual contents in words that can never do justice to the rich array of details that are immediately apparent to spectators eyes and ears; instead, video essayists can simply show their viewers what they want them to see. This does not mean, however, that it is any easier to write effectively with video than it is to compose an essay with pen and paper. Similar types of expository and argumentative planning are involved in both forms, while the new technology introduces its own characteristic challenges and choices, including decisions about the spatial and temporal organization and transformation of audiovisual materials, the addition of onscreen text, voiceover commentary, and visual effects. By taking a hands-on approach, we will develop our skills with editing software such as Adobe Premiere Pro and Apple's Final Cut Pro while also cultivating our awareness of the formal and narrative techniques employed in films and other moving-image media. Through weekly assignments and group critique sessions, we will learn to express ourselves more effectively and creatively in audiovisual media. As a culmination of our efforts, we will assemble a group exhibition of our best video essays for public display on campus.nNo previous experience is required, but a willingness to learn new technologies (in particular, video editing software) is important.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Denson, S. (PI)

FILMSTUD 112: Women in French Cinema: 1958- (FEMGEN 192, FRENCH 192)

Women as objects and subjects of the voyeuristic gaze inherent to cinema. The myth of the feminine idol in French films in historical and cultural context since the New Wave until now. The mythology of stars as the imaginary vehicle that helped France to change from traditional society to modern, culturally mixed nation. The evolution of female characters, roles, actresses, directors in the film industry. Filmmakers include Vadim, Truffaut, Varda, Godard, Ozon, Colline Serreau, Tonie Marshall, Maïwen. Discussion in English; films in French with English subtitles. 3 units, 4 units or 5 units.nNOTE: FILMSTUD students must take this course for 3 units only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alduy, C. (PI)

FRENCH 166: Food, Text, Music: A Multidisciplinary Lab on the Art of Feasting (FRENCH 366, MUSIC 133, MUSIC 333)

Students cook a collection of unfamiliar recipes each week while learning about the cultural milieus in which they originated. The course focuses on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, a time of great banquets that brought together chefs, visual artists, poets, musicians, and dancers. Students read late-medieval cookbooks under the guidance of professional chefs, learn songs and poetry with the help of visiting performers, and delve into a burgeoning scholarly literature on food history and sensory experience. We will also study trade routes and food networks, the environmental impact of large-scale banquets, the science of food, and the politics of plenty. This course may count towards the Medieval component of the French major, and corresponds to DLCL 121, a course requirement for the Medieval Studies Minor. Students interested in applying for course need to email Professors Galvez and Rodin (mailto:mgalvez@stanford.edu and mailto:jrodin@stanford.edu) with a statement of intent and dietary restrictions/preferences.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FRENCH 192: Women in French Cinema: 1958- (FEMGEN 192, FILMSTUD 112)

Women as objects and subjects of the voyeuristic gaze inherent to cinema. The myth of the feminine idol in French films in historical and cultural context since the New Wave until now. The mythology of stars as the imaginary vehicle that helped France to change from traditional society to modern, culturally mixed nation. The evolution of female characters, roles, actresses, directors in the film industry. Filmmakers include Vadim, Truffaut, Varda, Godard, Ozon, Colline Serreau, Tonie Marshall, Maïwen. Discussion in English; films in French with English subtitles. 3 units, 4 units or 5 units.nNOTE: FILMSTUD students must take this course for 3 units only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alduy, C. (PI)

ILAC 111Q: Spanish-English Literary Translation Workshop (DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practicalnskills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English andnEnglish to Spanish. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies,nand semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translationnin the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological andnsocio-cultural forces that shape translations. Students will workshop andnrevise an original translation project throughout the quarter.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ILAC 113Q: Borges and Translation (DLCL 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 241: Fiction Workshop in Spanish

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 242: Poetry Workshop in Spanish

Latin American and Spanish poetry approached through elements of craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on lyric subgenres (e.g. ode, elegy, prose poetry) and formal elements of poetry (e.g. meter, rhythm, rhetorical figures, and tropes). Students write original poems over the course of the quarter. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Authors include Dari­o, Machado, Jimenez, Vallejo, Huidobro, Salinas, Pales Matos, Lorca, Aleixandre, Cernuda, Neruda, Girondo. Course is offered every other year. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course taught in Spanish, or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 10 students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Santana, C. (PI)

ITALIC 93: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture

ITALIC is an arts-minded, residence-based academic program for freshmen. It's built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical and practical purposes of art. It also builds community. This yearlong experience fosters close exchanges among faculty, students, guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We¿ll trace the challenges that works of art have presented to history, politics, and culture, particularly since the 19th century. We'll look at ways arts can inform creative problem-solving, confront uncertainty and ambiguity, and experiment with different sets of rules. Through rigorous inquiry, ITALIC seeks to create new frameworks for exploring our (and others') experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JEWISHST 147B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (COMPLIT 127B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shemtov, V. (PI)

LIFE 124: Counterstory and Narrative Inquiry in Literature and Education (CSRE 141E, EDUC 141, EDUC 341)

Counterstory is a method developed in critical legal studies that emerges out of the broad "narrative turn" in the humanities and social science. This course explores the value of this turn, especially for marginalized communities, and the use of counterstory as analysis, critique, and self-expression. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we examine counterstory as it has developed in critical theory, critical pedagogy, and critical race theory literatures, and explore it as a framework for liberation, cultural work, and spiritual exploration.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LIFE 125: The Stillness of the Dunes

An advanced writing course in nonfiction craft, drawing, and contemplative practice. a significant portion of each class meeting will focus on the development and sharpening of writing craft, especially of the essay, in a hybrid form both scholarly and personal. We will also explore writing as meditative practice, through examples and through short exercises. We will deepen our cultural understanding of the desert and its impact, through art, literature, philosophy, film, and contemplative practice, and the course will build toward a four-day camping trip to the dunes of Death Valley, six weeks into the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Todhunter, A. (PI)

LIFE 145: Trauma, healing, and empowerment

This course will look at the ways in which humans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 13AX: Form & Space

In this course students will explore the inherent order in 3-dimensional space that underlies and determines nature of form and structure, and then use that knowledge to inform the design and fabrication of original artworks. A survey of relevant artists and architects will suggest the rich potential for creative expression that results from a deep understanding of the nature of space. Topics will include: symmetry, pattern, tessellation, duality, transformation, polyhedra, space-filling.<br><br>The course will be conducted in Room 36, a state-of-the art maker space. Students will learn how to use a professional CAD program and a computer-controlled laser cutter to create models out of paper, plastic, and wood. Students will have access to 3D printers, and other digital and analog fabrication tools.<br><br>Students considering taking this course need not have any background in the visual arts, but should have a firm foundation and avid interest in geometry. Access to a Mac or Windows Laptops is required.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Edmark, J. (PI)

ME 21: Renaissance Machine Design

Preference to freshmen. Technological innovations of the 1400s that accompanied the proliferation of monumental art and architecture by Brunelleschi, da Vinci, and others who designed machines and invented novel construction, fresco, and bronze-casting techniques. The social and political climate, from the perspective of a machine designer, that made possible and demanded engineering expertise from prominent artists. Hands-on projectsto provide a physical understanding of Renaissance-era engineering challenges and introduce the pleasure of creative engineering design. Technical background not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cutkosky, M. (PI)

ME 101: Visual Thinking

Lecture/lab. Visual thinking and language skills are developed and exercised in the context of solving design problems. Exercises for the mind's eye. Rapid visualization and prototyping with emphasis on fluent and flexible idea production. The relationship between visual thinking and the creative process. Limited enrollment, attendance at first class required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 124: Visual Expressions

A hands-on exploration of the elements and principles of 2D and 3D design common to all the visual arts. Through a mix of theory, analysis, and practice the student will develop his/her ability to interpret visual content and produce effective imagery. Limited enrollment, attendance at first class required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 125: Visual Frontiers

The student will learn how to use graphic design to communicate online, in person, and through printed matter. Fundamentals of visual communications will be applied to branding exercises, typographic studies, color explorations, drawing exercises, use of photography, and use of grid and layout systems.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MUSIC 10AX: Science of Sound

Science of Sound will explore sound and sound-related technology from the perspectives of mathematics, physics, and acoustics. Scientists and engineers will have a chance to apply their technical knowledge to the field of music while musicians will learn how sound behaves physically and how it can be recorded, processed, and reproduced. Using the newly opened Bing Concert Hall as a focal point, we will study the science of sound recording, room acoustics, and multi-channel mixing and playback. Students will use what they learn to create short multi-channel compositions using special techniques to place sounds spatially. These pieces will be performed during the annual outdoor Summer CCRMA Transitions concert and again during the Fall 2014 CCRMA concert at Bing Concert Hall. We will use the textbook by Jay Kadis entitled Science of Sound Recording as our primary text and incorporate plenty of hands-on experience with sound equipment and electronics.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MUSIC 11A: Orchestral Repertoire and Technique for Violin

Open to major and non-majors who would like to learn orchestral pieces and performance technique, including the works from the Stanford Symphony Orchestra's concert program. Priority is given to students who sign up for SSO and SPO. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 12A: Introductory Piano Class

(A=level 1; B=level 2; C=level 3) There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information. Class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Preference to department majors. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12AS: Introductory Piano Class, Level 1 (Group)

Piano: Introductory Level 1 (Group; 10 students to a section) (A=Level 1; B=Level 2; C=Level 3). Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12B: Introductory Piano Class

This class is closed by design. To enroll, please sign up on the Axess waitlist and show up on the first day to receive a permission number for re-enrollment. Your place on the waitlist will be considered a reservation. If the waitlist is closed, there are no more spaces in the class. (A=level 1; B=level 2; C=level 3) There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12BS: Introductory Piano Class, Level 2 (Group)

Piano: Introductory Level 2 (Group; 10 students to a section) (A=Level 1; B=Level 2; C=Level 3). Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12C: Introductory Piano Class

This class is closed by design. To enroll, please sign up on the Axess waitlist and show up on the first day to receive a permission number for re-enrollment. Your place on the waitlist will be considered a reservation. If the waitlist is closed, there are no more spaces in the class. (A=level 1; B=level 2; C=level 3.) May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12CS: Introductory Piano Class, Level 3 (Group)

Piano: Introductory Level 3 (Group; 10 students to a section) (A=Level 1; B=Level 2; C=Level 3). Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 15N: The Aesthetics of Data

Focus on visual and auditory display of data, specifically, the importance of aesthetic principles in effective data display, and the creative potential of scientific, biological, environmental and other data as inspiration for artistic expression.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MUSIC 19A: Introduction to Music Theory

For non-music majors and Music majors or minors unable to pass the proficiency test for entry to MUSIC 21. The fundamentals of music theory and notation, basic sight reading, sight singing, ear training, keyboard harmony; melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation. Skill oriented, using piano and voice as basic tools to develop listening and reading skills.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berger, T. (PI); Rose, F. (PI)

MUSIC 19B: Intermediate Music Theory

This course is an introduction to music theory geared toward students who have basic literacy skills (i.e. fundamental notation, identifying major and minor scales, keys, etc). Using musical materials from repertoire selected from campus and area concerts, and incorporating the opportunity to attend these concerts, the course will introduce elements of harmony, melody, form, orchestration and arrangement. The course is an appropriate successor to Music 19A. Students who successfully complete Music 19B can go on directly to Music 21.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berger, T. (PI)

MUSIC 20A: Jazz Theory (AFRICAAM 20A)

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: 19 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nadel, J. (PI)

MUSIC 20B: Advanced Jazz Theory

Approaches to improvisation through listening and transcribing, and developing familiarity with important contributors to this music. Topics: scale theory, altered dominants, and substitute harmony. Prerequisite: 20A or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 20C: Jazz Arranging and Composition

Jazz arranging and composition for small ensembles. Foundation for writing for big band. Prerequisite: 20A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nadel, J. (PI)

MUSIC 21: Elements of Music I

Preference to majors. Introduction to tonal theory. Practice and analysis. Diatonic harmony focusing on melodic and harmonic organization, functional relationships, voice-leading, and tonal structures. Students must concurrently enroll in an Ear-training and musicianship lab (MUSIC 24a, 24b, or 24c as appropriate). Music majors must take 4 courses in ear training, and pass an ear training exit exam in their Junior year. Enrollment limited to 40. Prerequisites: (1) Piano Proficiency Exam (must be passed within the first two weeks of the term) or MUSIC 12A (may be taken concurrently); (2) Passing grade on a basic musical skills proficiency examination on the first day of class or MUSIC 19.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 22: Elements of Music II

Preference to majors. Introduction to chromatic harmony focusing on secondary functions, modulations, harmonic sequences, mode mixture, and the Neapolitan, and augmented sixth chords. Analysis of musical forms and harmonizations complemented by harmonic and melodic dictation, sight singing, and other practical skills. Students must concurrently enroll in an Ear-training and musicianship lab (MUSIC 24a, 24b, or 24c as appropriate). Music majors must take 4 courses in ear training, and pass an ear training exit exam in their Junior year. Prerequisites: (1) MUSIC 21; (2) Piano Proficiency Exam or MUSIC 12B (may be taken concurrently).
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 23: Elements of Music III

Preference to majors. Continuation of chromatic harmony and complex forms of late Romantic period. Students must concurrently enroll in an Ear-training and musicianship lab (MUSIC 24a, 24b, or 24c as appropriate). Music majors must take 4 courses in ear training, and pass an ear training exit exam in their Junior year. Prerequisites: (1) MUSIC 22; (2) Piano Proficiency Exam or MUSIC 12C (may be taken concurrently).
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berger, T. (PI)

MUSIC 26N: Japanese Arts: a Creative Exploration

The striking originality of Japanese contemporary culture seems to defy unifying pressures of globalization. What are the sources of this originality? Can it be traced to the unique and sophisticated art forms like rock gardens, haiku, tea ceremony, martial arts, ikebana and Noh Theater or to the illusive aesthetic notions of wabi, sabi, yûgen, ma or jo-ha-kyû? Exploration of Japanese arts through comparative examination and direct engagement. Creative projects and workshops in traditional Japanese arts.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MUSIC 32N: Sculpting with Sounds, Images, and Words

Throughout history and from East to West, cultures abound in multimedia forms. Whether in Coldplay's Music Video or Fantasia, Pepsi TV adds or Wagner's opera, Miyazaki anime or traditional Noh Theater of Japan, the three modes of expression (sounds, images, and word) are interwoven in distinctive ways. What are their individual and combined powers? How can one harness them in an online context? Can Web be a stage for multimedia theater? What is unique about the poetry of intermodal metaphor? The course will be an opportunity to face these questions in creative web-based projects as well as through in-class viewing of multimedia works, analysis and debates, readings, and student presentations. The seminar will be taught at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics where students will have access to new media technologies. Prior experience in music, literature, art practice or computer programming is welcome but not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kapuscinski, J. (PI)

MUSIC 34N: Performing America: The Broadway Musical

Musical theater as a site for the construction of American identity in the twentieth century to the present. Issues of class, race, gender, and sexuality; intersections with jazz, rock, and pop; roles of lyricist, composer, director, choreographer, producer, performers. Individual shows (Showboat, Oklahoma, South Pacific, Guys and Dolls, West Side Story, Wicked, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, Book of Mormon), show tunes in jazz performance, film musicals, and television. Opportunities for performance and attendance at local productions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Grey, T. (PI)

MUSIC 36N: Humor in Music

Through theoretical readings the course will touch on psychological and neurological bases of humor, explore contingent, tactical, modal, and ontological difficulties in the apprehension of humor, and address ethical issues surrounding humor in music. In addition to in-class listening and screening sessions, analytic discussions will be led by students who will find and present examples of humor in music. Students will also be invited to compose original humorous song lyrics and to create collaborative works of musical humor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 37N: Ki ho'alu: The New Renaissance of a Hawaiian Musical Tradition

Preference to freshman. Developed in the Hawaiian Islands during the 1830s, ki ho'alu, or Hawaiian slack key guitar, is an art form experiencing newfound popularity coinciding with the growth of political activism in Hawaiian culture. The musical, cultural, historical, and political perspectives of Hawaiian music and ki ho'alu, through hands-on experience, readings, discussion, and workshops. Hawaiian music and history and relationships among performance, cultural expression, community, and identity.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 38N: Singing Early Music

Preference to freshmen. 15th- and 16th-century musical repertories and their contexts; performance practice.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MUSIC 65A: Voice Class I

Group (7 students to a section) beginning voice (A = level 1; B = level 2). May be repeated for credit. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. This class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Giovannetti, C. (PI)

MUSIC 65AS: Voice Class 1: Beginning Voice, Level 1 (Group)

Group (6 students to a section) beginning voice (A = level 1; B = level 2). Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Linduska, M. (PI)

MUSIC 65B: Voice Class II

Group (7 students to a section) beginning voice for the non-major (A = level 1; B = level 2). May be repeated for credit. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. This class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Giovannetti, C. (PI)

MUSIC 65BS: Voice Class 2: Beginning Voice, Level 2 (Group)

Group (6 students to a section) beginning voice (A = level 1; B = level 2). Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Linduska, M. (PI)

MUSIC 72A: Intermediate Piano Class

For intermediate students. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Prerequisites: 12C or equivalent, audition. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information. This class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 72AS: Intermediate Piano Class (Group)

Piano: Intermediate Level (Group; 10 students to a section) Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 72C: Harpsichord Class

For beginning harpsichord students who have keyboard skills. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. Admission based on instructor consent. Contact instructor prior to enrolling to discuss availability. Class meets in Braun 201. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bar-David, E. (PI)

MUSIC 72D: Jazz Piano Class

Priority to majors and jazz-ensemble participants. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Low, M. (PI)

MUSIC 72G: Gu-Zheng Class

Introduction to Chinese music through learning how to play Gu-Zheng, a 21-stringed traditional Chinese instrument. The cultural, social, and historical significance of Gu-Zheng. 15 Gu-Zheng techniques, how to read Chinese music and Gu-Zheng notation, and two simple classic Gu-Zheng pieces. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee information. All participants must enroll. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; You, H. (PI)

MUSIC 74AA: Introductory Violin Class Level 1: Beginner

Open to majors and non-majors. Focus is on beginning violin skills. Topics include brief history and physics of the instrument, and survey of repertoire. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI)

MUSIC 74AB: Introductory Violin Class Level 2: Intermediate

Open to majors and non-majors. Focus is on beginning violin skills. Topics include brief history and physics of the instrument, and survey of repertoire. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI)

MUSIC 74AC: Introductory Violin Class Level 3: Advanced Intermediate

Open to majors and non-majors. Focus is on beginning violin skills. Topics include brief history and physics of the instrument, and survey of repertoire. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI)

MUSIC 74C: Classical Guitar Class

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit https://music.stanford.edu/ensembles-lessons/applied-music-policies/applied-music-fees-and-policies for class fee information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ferguson, C. (PI)

MUSIC 74D: Harp Class

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chauvel, M. (PI)

MUSIC 75B: Renaissance Wind Instruments Class

May be repeated for credit. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Myers, H. (PI)

MUSIC 76: Brass Instruments Class

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kenley, M. (PI)

MUSIC 76A: Tuba Class

Basic brass techniques as they apply to the tuba including warmups, breathing, and developing a daily routine. For beginning through intermediate players. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clements, T. (PI)

MUSIC 77: Percussion Class

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mach, L. (PI)

MUSIC 101: Introduction to Creating Electronic Sounds

Students to explore their creative voices by learning the practical nuts and bolts of making sounds with computers and professional audio equipment. Basic concepts include mixing and production techniques used in podcasts, documentaries, live performance, electronic music, and sound art. Students will create a midterm soundscape project as well as a final class project that is focused on their particular creative interests.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Callery, E. (PI)

MUSIC 102: Picturing Performance, Re-Envisioning the Arts (MUSIC 202)

Critical and creative exploration of the performing body as captured on film. Viewing/listening includes musicals, dance and opera on film, music video, experimental film and video, and moments of heightened musicality in feature film. We¿ll focus on examples of moving media that possess a kinship with music¿through gesture, rhythm or affect and through visual parameters like décor, lighting, texture, camera movement and editing. Requirements include choosing and documenting a live performance, producing a short audiovisual work involving post-production, and weekly reading and viewing/listening assignments. No previous videomaking experience required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vernallis, C. (PI)

MUSIC 112: Creative Expression: Musical Theater

Students begin to create pieces that are fresh and innovative forms of musical theater that do not necessarily appeal to specifically popular audiences but perhaps to audiences more associated with high art, opera, or even contemporary independent music. Musical theater is an untapped resource of potential artistic innovation and has unfortunately become stuck in an ideal of universal accessibility. In present popular culture and the culture of contemporary art forms, musical theater almost exclusively refers to popular productions such as Phantom of the Opera, Rent, Wicked, Jesus Christ Superstar. Although excellent pieces of art in their own way, both dramaturgically and in their ability to evoke emotion through catchy melodies, for the most part each of them have their basis in popular and traditional musical idioms and theatrical forms, seldom exploring more advanced or avant-garde and experimental compositional and theatrical techniques.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 123: Undergraduate Seminar in Composition

Current trends in composition. May be repeated for credit a total of 7 times. Prerequisites: Music major; 23 or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 123A: Undergraduate Seminar in Composition: Rhythmic Design

Students compose weekly exercises to develop creative fluency and personal style. The course focuses on listening to examples, analysis and emulation of diverse compositional techniques involving rhythm.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rose, F. (PI)

MUSIC 123B: Undergraduate Seminar in Composition: Pitch Design

Students compose weekly exercises to develop creative fluency and personal style. The course focuses on listening to examples, analysis and emulation of diverse compositional techniques involving pitch.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rose, F. (PI)

MUSIC 124A: Songwriters Workshop

Laboratory for composers of any kind of vernacular music: singer-songwriters; folk singers; laptop dance music composers; rock and pop bands; rappers; writers of instrumentals or music with lyrics; solo artists and collaborators; etc. Compositional strategies for songwriting, overview of exemplars, discussion of aesthetic issues, and development of artistic personae. Weekly critique session for students and faculty to share work and offer feedback. Music theory and literacy not required. Aimed, however, at those with at least some experience as writers, whether casual or extensive. For bands at least half of members must be enrolled.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Applebaum, M. (PI)

MUSIC 127: Instrumentation and Orchestration

Individual instruments, instrumental groups within the orchestra, and combinations of groups. Arrangements from piano to orchestral music. Score analysis with respect to orchestration. Practical exercises using chamber ensembles and school orchestra. Prerequisite: 23.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aquilanti, G. (PI)

MUSIC 128: Stanford Laptop Orchestra: Composition, Coding, and Performance (CS 170)

Classroom instantiation of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra (SLOrk) which includes public performances. An ensemble of more than 20 humans, laptops, controllers, and special speaker arrays designed to provide each computer-mediated instrument with its sonic identity and presence. Topics and activities include issues of composing for laptop orchestras, instrument design, sound synthesis, programming, and live performance. May be repeated four times for credit. Space is limited; see https://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/128 for information about the application and enrollment process. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, G. (PI)

MUSIC 130A: Introduction to Conducting

Baton techniques and rehearsal procedures. The development of coordination of the members of the body involved in conducting; fluency in beat patterns and meters; dynamics, tempi, cueing, and use of the left hand in conducting. Prerequisites: 122B and diagnostic musicianship exam given first day of class.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 130C: Elementary Choral Conducting

Techniques specific to the conducting of choral ensembles: warm-ups, breathing, balance, blend, choral tone, isolation principles, recitative conducting, preparation, and conducting of choral/orchestral works. Prerequisite: 130A.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 133: Food, Text, Music: A Multidisciplinary Lab on the Art of Feasting (FRENCH 166, FRENCH 366, MUSIC 333)

Students cook a collection of unfamiliar recipes each week while learning about the cultural milieus in which they originated. The course focuses on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, a time of great banquets that brought together chefs, visual artists, poets, musicians, and dancers. Students read late-medieval cookbooks under the guidance of professional chefs, learn songs and poetry with the help of visiting performers, and delve into a burgeoning scholarly literature on food history and sensory experience. We will also study trade routes and food networks, the environmental impact of large-scale banquets, the science of food, and the politics of plenty. This course may count towards the Medieval component of the French major, and corresponds to DLCL 121, a course requirement for the Medieval Studies Minor. Students interested in applying for course need to email Professors Galvez and Rodin (mailto:mgalvez@stanford.edu and mailto:jrodin@stanford.edu) with a statement of intent and dietary restrictions/preferences.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MUSIC 150R: Robert Schumann and the Idea of Musical Romanticism

The creative personality and musical compositions of Robert Schumann (1810-1856) as exemplars of the idea of Romanticism in European culture of the early nineteenth century. Survey of major genres (solo piano, Lieder, symphonies, chamber music, choral music) in dialogue with Romantic literary and visual cultures. Students prepare at least one or two works by Schumann or contemporary figures (Mendelssohn, Chopin, Brahms, Clara Schumann) for presentation in lecture-recital format. Prerequisites: Music 22 or equivalent (intermediate music theory), intermediate or higher performance ability in piano, strings, or voice
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Grey, T. (PI)

MUSIC 154A: Sound Art I (ARTSTUDI 131)

Acoustic, digital and analog approaches to sound art. Familiarization with techniques of listening, recording, digital processing and production. Required listening and readings in the history and contemporary practice of sound art. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 155: Intermedia Workshop (ARTSTUDI 239, MUSIC 255)

Students develop and produce intermedia works. Musical and visual approaches to the conceptualisation and shaping of time-based art. Exploration of sound and image relationship. Study of a wide spectrum of audiovisual practices including experimental animation, video art, dance, performance, non-narrative forms, interactive art and installation art. Focus on works that use music/sound and image as equal partners. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: consent of instructors, and one of FILMPROD 114, ARTSTUDI 131, 138, 167, 177, 179, or MUSIC 123, or equivalent. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 156: "sic": Improvisation Collective

Small ensemble devoted to learning trans-idiomatic improvisation techniques and composing indeterminate pieces in a workshop setting. One major concert. Prerequisite: access to an instrument. Improvisational experience and conventional instrumental virtuosity not required. May be repeated for credit for a total of 3 times.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Applebaum, M. (PI)

MUSIC 160: Stanford Symphony Orchestra

70- to 100-member ensemble performing major orchestral works; minimum one concert per quarter. Admission and enrollment based on audition. For audition and contact information, please refer to the SSO/SPO/SNE website at (http://sso.stanford.edu). All participants must enroll. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Phillips, P. (PI)

MUSIC 160A: Stanford Philharmonia

Prerequisite: audition, one year of 160, or consent of instructor. Admission and enrollment based on audition. For audition and contact information, please refer to the SSO/SPO/SNE website at (http://sso.stanford.edu). All participants must register. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Phillips, P. (PI)

MUSIC 160B: Stanford New Ensemble

Performing compositions of the 20th century, recent works of this century, and new works by Stanford faculty and student composers. Musicians collaborate with composers and artists visiting and performing at Stanford. One concert per quarter. Admission and enrollment based on audition. For audition and contact information, please refer to the SSO/SPO/SNE website at (http://www.stanford.edu/group/sso/cgi-bin/wordpress/member-login/). All participants must register. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI)

MUSIC 160C: Stanford Baroque Soloists

Elite string group focusing on concerti by Corelli, Vivaldi and other Italians, Bach, Handel and other Germans, as well as theater music by Purcell and Lully. Each member expected to solo as well as play backup. Performances each quarter, played standing, student-led without conductor. Coaching will emphasize leadership and ensemble techniques, intonation and blend, particulars of eighteenth century notation and performance practice. Modern instruments, modern pitch, baroque bows as available. Limited to six violins, three violas, three cellos, bass, admission by audition. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. Contact instructor for audition and enrollment information: apmartin@stanford.edu. May be repeated for credit for total completion of 15 and total 15 units. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Martin, A. (PI)

MUSIC 161A: Stanford Wind Symphony

40- to 50-member ensemble performing transcriptions of symphonic music, brass band music, and repertoire composed specifically for symphonic band. One concert per quarter. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aquilanti, G. (PI)

MUSIC 161B: Jazz Orchestra

Jazz Orchestra is an undergraduate large ensemble performance class. Admission is by audition and/or permission of instructor. The class meets three times per week and presents a minimum of one formal concert per quarter with a major jazz artist. The class endeavors to provide students with the opportunity to perform, at the highest level, jazz compositions and arrangements of a serious nature, and provide opportunities for challenging and creative improvisational situations. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the structural, psychological, and emotional components of the materials studied and performed. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeated for total of 15 times. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Galisatus, M. (PI)

MUSIC 161D: Stanford Brass Ensemble

Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. Performance of works for full brass choir and for smaller ensembles of brass instruments. Once weekly rehearsals. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: audition and consent of instructor. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 162: Symphonic Chorus

180- to 200-voice choral ensemble, performing major choral masterworks with orchestra. One concert per quarter. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI)

MUSIC 163: Memorial Church Choir

Official choir of Memorial Church, furnishing music for Sunday services and special occasions in the church calendar. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Morgan, R. (PI)

MUSIC 165: Chamber Chorale

Select 24-voice choral ensemble, specializing in virtuoso choral repertoire from all periods of Western art music. Annual touring commitment required. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI)

MUSIC 167: University Singers

Select, 50-voice choral ensemble, performing choral repertoire from all periods of Western art music. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Morgan, R. (PI)

MUSIC 169: Stanford Taiko

Select 15- to 18-member North American taiko ensemble, performing all-original repertoire for Japanese drums. Multiple performances in Winter and Spring quarters, also touring; instrument construction and maintenance. Admission by audition in Autumn Quarter only. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI); Uyechi, L. (PI)

MUSIC 170: Collaborative Piano

Performance class in a workshop setting. Techniques of collaboration with vocalists and instrumentalists in repertoire ranging from songs and arias to sonatas and concertos. Prerequisite: private-lesson proficiency level in piano, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dahl, L. (PI)

MUSIC 171: Chamber Music

Admission based on audition. Weekly one-hour coachings from Music department faculty. Search for instructor section in Axess. Classical string quartets and piano/string groups are supervised by the St. Lawrence String Quartet. Two masterclasses and one performance per quarter are required. May be repeated for credit. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website for policy, procedure, and audition sign up: http://music.stanford.edu/ By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 172A: Piano

Private lessons and group master class weekly. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 172B: Organ

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Morgan, R. (PI)

MUSIC 172C: Harpsichord

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bar-David, E. (PI)

MUSIC 172D: Jazz Piano

By invitation only; priority to majors and jazz-ensemble participants. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Low, M. (PI)

MUSIC 172E: Fortepiano

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. edit Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barth, G. (PI)

MUSIC 172F: Carillon

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 172G: Gu-Zheng

Private lessons weekly. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; You, H. (PI)

MUSIC 173: Voice

Private lessons and group master classes weekly. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 174A: Violin

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 174B: Viola

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 174C: Violoncello

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 174D: Contrabass

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moyer, B. (PI)

MUSIC 174E: Viola Da Gamba

Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dornenburg, J. (PI)

MUSIC 174F: Classical Guitar

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ferguson, C. (PI)

MUSIC 174G: Harp

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chauvel, M. (PI)

MUSIC 174H: Baroque Violin

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Martin, A. (PI)

MUSIC 174J: Jazz Guitar

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vandivier, R. (PI)

MUSIC 175A: Flute

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 175B: Oboe

May be repeated for credit a total of 15 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; May, C. (PI)

MUSIC 175C: Clarinet

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brandenburg, M. (PI)

MUSIC 175D: Bassoon

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olivier, R. (PI)

MUSIC 175E: Recorder/Early Winds

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Myers, H. (PI)

MUSIC 175F: Saxophone

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Henderson, D. (PI)

MUSIC 175G: Baroque Flute

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ellison, G. (PI)

MUSIC 175H: Jazz Saxophone

May be repeated for credit a total of 15 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McCarthy, C. (PI)

MUSIC 176A: French Horn

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ragent, L. (PI)

MUSIC 176B: Trumpet

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Luftman, A. (PI)

MUSIC 176C: Trombone

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kenley, M. (PI)

MUSIC 176D: Tuba

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clements, T. (PI)

MUSIC 176E: Jazz Trumpet

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Worley, J. (PI)

MUSIC 177: Percussion

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mach, L. (PI)

MUSIC 177A: Drum Set Lessons

These lessons will be geared toward the individual student's desires and needs. All levels are welcome, but students should contact instructor to set up initial meeting, prior to enrolling in the course. Students will explore drumset technique, coordination, reading and a study various styles including, Jazz, Rock, R&B, Blues, Latin and Brazilian music. Students will use different texts as needed. These texts may include: Syncopation by Ted Reed, Modern Reading Text in 4/4 by Louis Bellson, A Funky Primer by Charles Dowd, Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer by Jim Chapin, and others. Students will also use material created by David for his classes "Around the World on a Drumset" and "Chart Reading Demystified." These lessons are designed to be both fun and challenging. Students will play along with recordings and are encouraged to bring in recordings of music that they enjoy. May be repeated for credit a total of 15 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rokeach, D. (PI)

MUSIC 183A: German Art Song Interpretation

By audition only. For advanced singers and pianists as partners. Performance class in a workshop setting. Composers include Beethoven, Schubert, Wolf and Strauss. May be repeated for credit a total of 2 times. Enrollment limit: 20 (ten singers maximum). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Recommended prerequisite: 170 (pianists) or 182 (singers).
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dahl, L. (PI)

MUSIC 183B: French Art Song Interpretation

By audition only. For advanced singers and pianists as partners. Performance class in a workshop setting. Composers include Fauré, Debussy, Ravel and Poulenc. May be repeated for credit a total of 2 times. Enrollment limit: 20 (ten singers maximum). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Recommended prerequisite: 170 (pianists) or 182 (singers).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 183D: Musical Theater (TAPS 115)

In this workshop we will traverse the landscape of world of Musical Theater. It will serve as an introduction for the beginning actor and singer, and expand the more experienced performer's range in this genre. The world of Musical Theater is filled with stories of love, passion, joy, violence, heartbreak and rage. The class will include an introduction to vocal and movement skills for musical theater, beginning with exercises to build an ensemble and encourage a sense of play and relaxation in supportive environment. Our class must be a place where everyone feels safe. As ensemble members, we will be responsible for each other in this environment. nnStudents will choose one solo song, and perform in a group number from this exciting discipline. The instructor will work with the actors on technique, utilization of action, specificity of language, personalization, and emotional truth. A professional coach from the theater community will conduct vocal coaching. Physical warm-ups and choreography will be suited for both the dancer and non-dancer.nnThe class will culminate in the last week with live performance for friends and family.nnSTUDENTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO BRING THEIR OWN SUGGESTIONS. (Isn't there a role you've always wanted to sing?)nnRequired text: Broadway Musicals Show by Show: Sixth Edition - Stanley Green; Paperback
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Amarotico, K. (PI)

MUSIC 184B: Topics in Opera Stagecraft

This course is a practical workshop in vocal repertoire for the stage. Each quarter's offering emphasizes a specific genre or period, therefore the course can be repeated with permission of the instructor. In addition to broadening the student's knowledge of vocal repertoire, the following skills are developed: text preparation, foreign language translation and diction; rehearsal etiquette for performance and/or recording. Prerequisite: vocal or instrumental instruction, as the class is open to singers or collaborative artists. May be repeated for credit a total of 4 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Catsalis, M. (PI)

MUSIC 184E: Musical Theater Dance Styles (DANCE 102)

Students will be able to demonstrate period specificity, character of style through learning different musical theater dances from the early 20th C.to the present. ALL students will participate in an end of quarter showing of the choreography developed and composed in class. nClass will be supplemented with the occasional guest, DJ accompaniment and video viewing.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

MUSIC 185: Technologies of Musical Expression

Music is made and experienced through technology created for it. These technologies allow for expression but influence the result. This course will utilize special collections, acoustical tools, music-making apps, live musicians, and media both historical and modern to reflect on the ways people make music expressive. The course is designed around creative projects and hands on experiences with digital and analogue media, player pianos, archival manuscripts, and sound sculptures to stimulate discussion about the role of technology in our musical experiences. Projects can include performances using digital and analogue media, performance art, creating player piano rolls, or performance ethnographies, etc. WAYS credit for 3 units and grade only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 186B: American Song in the 20th Century and after (AMSTUD 186B, MUSIC 286B)

Critical and creative exploration of song in the Americas. About twenty-five key examples will guide discussion of the interactions between words, music, performance and culture. Weekly listening, reading and assignments will be organized around central themes: love, sex and romance; war and politics; labor and money; place; identity; society and everyday life. Genres include art song; blues, gospel, jazz and country; pop, soul, rock and hip-hop; bossa nova, nueva canción and salsa; electronic and experimental. Takehome and in-class assignments will include critical and creative writing, and music composition, production and performance; final projects may emphasize any of the above.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 187: Music and Culture from the Land of Fire: Introduction to Azerbaijani Mugham

Nestled in the Caucasus, Azerbaijan is a crossroads between East and West; its rich musical heritage contains threads of Turkish, Central Asian, Persian, Caucasian, Russian, and Arabic traditions. In this course, master-musician Imamyar Hasanov teaches students to perform and appreciate Azeri music. Content includes classical mugham, Eastern theory, improvisation and microtonality. We¿ll discuss Azeri music culture, supplemented by guest lecturers and Skype¿ interviews with musicians in Azerbaijan. Open to students with any experience playing a musical instrument (including voice). No previous experience with Azeri music necessary. Supported by the SF World Music Festival.Questions? Email schultza@stanford.edu.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 192B: Advanced Sound Recording Technology

Topics: noise reduction techniques; dynamics and time-delay audio effects; the principles of digital audio; disk- and tape-based digital recorders; digital audio workstations and editing; advanced multitrack techniques; SMPTE and MIDI time code and device synchronization; MIDI sequencing and synchronization. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/. Prerequisite: 192A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kadis, J. (PI)

MUSIC 222: Sound in Space

Historical background, techniques and theory on the use of space in music composition and diffusion. Listening and analysis of relevant pieces. Experimental work in spatialization techniques leading to short studies to be diffused in concert at the end of the quarter.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 223: Composition for Electronic Musicians

Composition for any combination of acoustic and electroacoustic instrumentation, computer-generated sound, invented instruments, sound-sculptures, and multi-disciplinary elements including theater and visual media. Project-based laboratory to advance original student works, supported by lectures on the fundamentals of composition. Concert performance of final works. Taught at CCRMA with a focus on engendering deliberate conversation on the enrichment of a cultural context for new media. Open to undergraduates and graduates.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hodge, C. (PI)

NENS 222: Dance, Movement and Medicine: Immersion in Dance for PD (DANCE 100)

Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance class for people with PD. This Community Engaged Learning component provides opportunity to engage meaningfully with people in the PD community. Dancing together weekly, students will experience firsthand the embodied signature values of "Dance for PD" classes: full inclusion, embodied presence, aesthetic and expressive opportunity for creative engagement, and community-building in action. A weekly debriefing session within Friday's class time will allow students to integrate seminar material with their movement experiences.nnNO PRE-REQUISITES: No prior dance experience required. Beginners are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

OSPFLOR 32: Critical Strategies in Contemporary Photographic Practice: Florence Through a Lens

Technical knowledge and the evolved analytical and conceptual skills required to begin producing complex, reflexive, innovative and challenging photographic work. Workings of the camera, classical rules of aesthetic creation and the nature of light. History of the medium and its relationship to society as a whole. Ethical issues at the heart of photographic practice; examination of the scientific and philosophical foundations of photography itself.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bennet, N. (PI)

OSPFLOR 41: The Florentine Sketchbook: A Visual Arts Practicum

The ever-changing and multifaceted scene of contemporary art through visual and sensorial stimulation. How art is thought of and produced in Italy today. Hands-on experience. Sketching and exercises on-site at museums and exhibits, plus workshops on techniques. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rossi, F. (PI)

OSPFLOR 69: Abstract Art: Creativity, Self-Expression and Depicting the Unimaginable

Overview of the birth and evolution of abstract art with visual background necessary to produce works of art free of a realistic representation. Movements and trends in abstract art; experimentation with different media and techniques.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rossi, F. (PI)

OSPFLOR 71: A Studio with a View: Drawing, Painting and Informing your Aesthetic in Florence

Recent trends in art, current Italian artistic production, differences and the dialogue among visual arts. Events, schools, and movements of the 20th century. Theoretical background and practical training in various media. Work at the Stanford Center and on site at museums, exhibits, and out in the city armed with a sketchbook and camera. Emphasis is on drawing as the key to the visual arts. Workshops to master the techniques introduced. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rossi, F. (PI)

OSPKYOTO 74: In the Air of Kyoto: Sound, Site and Image

Developing a creative relationship with the sonic environment through investigation and exploration. The nature of sound as it exists in physical space and social space; as it emanates from and penetrates the listening body. Special attention to the acoustic sites of Kyoto with regard to both the historical and contemporary ways in which sound functions. Technical skills for recording, editing and mixing sounds; new ways of listening; collaborative projects for public presentation. Three main creative projects constitute the core of the practicum.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; DeMarinis, P. (PI)

OSPMADRD 18: Theory and Practice of Flamenco

Origins and history of flamenco and its place in Spanish culture, including both theory and actual dance instruction.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Perez-Leal, P. (GP)

OSPMADRD 46: Drawing with Four Spanish Masters: Goya, Velazquez, Picasso and Dali

Approaches, techniques, and processes in drawing. Visits to Madrid museums to study paintings and drawings by Goya, Velázquez, Picasso, and Dalí and to explore the experience of drawing. Subject matter: the figure, still life, interiors, landscape, and non-representational drawing. No previous experience required. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Perez-Leal, P. (GP)

OSPMADRD 84: Madrid Through My Eyes: A Theoreticl/Practical Documentary Film Workshop

Theoretical and practical view of Spanish language documentary cinema; potential of this type of film making as a form of personal expression. Tools for understanding and analyzing this type of cinema. Creative and analytical reflection on student 's Madrid experience; develop individual visual discourse to portray life in the city by filming a short documentary.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPPARIS 12: Paris Photography Workshop

Exploration of Paris through camera and lab techniques. Both theoretical and practical aspects of creative photography. Extensive field work. Students must bring camera or phone with camera. Enrollment limited. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Baudouin, N. (PI)

PWR 91CL: Intermediate Writing: Self & Science

"Self & Science" mines the intersection of memoir and science writing. In this advanced experimental writing course, students will read a selection of essays by writers including Lewis Thomas, Oliver Sacks, Annie Dillard, and Mark Doty, which illustrate the shared intellectual foundation in observation of scientific and poetic inquiry. Building on these readings, students will be challenged to produce an experimental essay that transgresses genre boundaries in the service of considering how personal reflection can narrate researched discoveries. Over the course of the quarter, students are invited to bolster their overall communication acumen, enhance their ability to share valuable discoveries beyond the confines of their major discipline, and practice the difficult bliss of engaging a discerning public audience. Click here for course video and full description: https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/self-science
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91CW: Intermediate Writing: Seeing is Believing

In this course, students will study and practice techniques and rhetorics of data visualization based on principles of rhetorical history, visual rhetorics and graphic design as well as cognitive science, design thinking, and other disciplines that inform critical conversations around information display and data visualization. For more information visit https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/additional-elective-courses/seeing-isand-believing-rhetoric-big-data-visualization.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wright, C. (PI)

PWR 91D: Intermediate Writing: Your American Life

In this course, you¿ll read and listen to some of the most moving and insightful pieces of the last decade, explore the important differences between print and oral storytelling, and then script and record your own full-length audio piece. Along the way, we will explore many craft elements that apply equally to print and audio pieces. You will learn, for example, how to organize your material, choose an effective structure, blend dramatization and reflection, ground insights in concrete scenes, create a strong narrative arc, and manage elements such as characterization, description, and dialogue. We will also, of course, explore craft elements unique to the audio form and you will learn how to use your voice and other sonic elements to craft the kind of piece you might hear on This American Life.nnThrough a special arrangement with the Stanford Storytelling Project, in the spring of 2012 this course will feature special sessions with prominent contributors to This American Life. n Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91E: Intermediate Writing: The Oral Tradition: Myth, Folklore, and Fairy Tale

Contemporary storytelling covers a variety of media - from movies to novels, theatre and beyond. What this course offers is an in depth study of the roots of that practice - the oral tradition.nnnOver the course we will explore many different motifs and structures that arise in the oral tradition, myth, folklore and fairy tale. What universal themes do we detect, and what separates the progression of a pacific north west Trickster story from an Arthurian romance? Why is it that in the early twenty first century many of our most acclaimed art forms carry narrative forms that are thousands of years old? Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and the recent broadway show Jerusalem, all follow scenic progressions informed by myth.nnnThe first encounter with the story will be an oral narrative - the myth told unscripted in the classroom. The stories, which range from the Arthurian romance Parzival to Trickster folk tales, will be told in several sections - with a running exegesis and student response alongside. Many of these stories are now transcripts and have become works of literature. We will explore both the complementary aspects of this development, and areas of tension.nnnDuring the course each student will embark on a project that demonstrates a thorough understanding of the topics covered, and utilizes those elements in their wider practice of writing and rhetoric. nnnThe project will be to research a story handed down within the family - an adventure of some distant relative, or a family migration from one country to another. Factoring in elements from the taught class, the student will mythologize the story: by writing an in depth commentary on its implications - factoring in contemporary, psychological and metaphorical associations. The second element will be to tell the story to the class. In these way we experience myth as a living principle, not something just from `a long time ago.¿
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91EP: Intermediate Writing: Communicating Climate Change: Navigating the Stories from the Frontlines (EARTHSYS 154)

In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will write and submit their article for publication.nnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91F: Finding Your Story

Life challenges us to become aware of the stories that shape us--family stories, cultural mythologies, even popular movies, television shows, and songs--and then create and live our own story. We face this challenge throughout our lives but perhaps most acutely as we move into adulthood; this is the period when we most need to become conscious of stories and their power, to gather wisdom, practices, and resources for finding our own story. This class, designed with seniors in mind, will illuminate and explore these resources and give you the opportunity to reflect deeply, in discussion and writing, on what truly calls to you in this life. We will engage with some of the world's great stories--myths, parables, teaching tales, modern fiction, even aphorisms, koans, and riddles. In them we can find both elements that resonate with our own story and provocations that help us unearth and cultivate our native gifts--the genius in each of us. We will look at short excerpts from masterworks and myths from around the world, all voices in the largest conversation we have as humans, the one that asks: who am I? why am I here? what truly matters? how can I be happy? Together we will investigate how these stories, and stories like them, can be used to help us find our own story. Students in this course will have a special opportunity to meet personally with poet Billy Collins and singer Aimee Mann when they visit campus in April. Does not fulfill NSC requirement. For students who have completed the first level of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first level of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91KS: Intermediate Writing: Design Thinking and Science Communication

Effective communication of expert knowledge in the sciences to non-specialist audiences. Project-based work on a range and variety of communication challenges, contexts, and media. For students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91MC: Intermediate Writing : Activist Rhetoric

How do activists effectively strategize for social change? In this hands-on approach to studying activism and social justice issues, students will encounter new methods for mass communication, collaboration, and self-inquiry. First, we will consider how activists address practical problems in a variety of contexts, from protest movements to direct action, political lobbying to philanthrocapitalism, from Black Lives Matter to immigration activists. We will visit Stanford Special Collections to find inspiration in the Huey P. Newton Collection--the archive of the Black Panther Party. To inform these experiences, we will read and analyze texts by the Combahee River Collective, Angela Davis, Judith Butler, Fred Moten, and Jackie Wang, as well as inviting several activists to visit our classroom. Through collaborative and creative coursework, students will gain experience in intersectional thinking, community organizing, and collective action by conducting teach-ins, writing their own social justice manifesto, and planning a final campus-wide action.nnThis course is part of the PWR advanced elective track in Social and Racial Justice (SRJ). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. See https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/activist-rhetoric for full course description.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SINY 114: Writing in the City

The craft of fiction writing and introduction to the literary culture of New York. Writing exercises will tune students¿ senses to the rhythms of New York. Students produce their own short stories, which will be examined in workshop discussions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Orringer, J. (PI)

SINY 116: Off the iPhone and Into the City: Creating a Photography Project

Learn components of photography projects and image making including content selection, intention, context, and audience. Talks by professional photographers; field trips to in the city. Two response papers about an exhibition, publication, or long-form web project during their time in New York.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jackson, D. (PI)

SINY 140: Mapping, time, space, and culture

New York, the financial and cultural capitol of the nation, provides an extraordinary laboratory for exploring the art and science of information representation. The proposed course aims to engage students in a broad swath of art and culture, contextualized by studying the sociopolitical urban landscape.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STS 103Q: Reading and Writing Poetry about Science

Preference to sophomores. Students will study recent poetry inspired by the phenomena and history of the sciences in order to write such poems themselves. These poems bring sensuous human experience to bear on biology, ecology, astronomy, physics, earth science, and medicine, as well as on technological advances and calamities. Poets such as Linda Bierds, Mark Doty, Albert Goldbarth, Sarah Lindsay, W.S. Merwin, Adrienne Rich, Pattiann Rogers, Tracy K. Smith, Arthur Sze, and C. K. Williams. Grounding in poetics, research in individually chosen areas of science, weekly analytical and creative writing. Fulfills the Creative Expression requirement. Enrollment limited to 12.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 17N: Acting for Activists

Acting for Activists is designed for students who are interested in combining acting with activism, performance with politics. We will work with theatre that responds to specific political events and crisis such as hate crimes or war through the performance of activist texts. We will also explore works that challenge inequalities of income, race, gender and sexual orientation. By the end of the course students will cultivate a critical vocabulary for discussing and critiquing work within acting/activist contexts and develop new strategies for creating theatre in relation to issues they are passionate about. Acting for Activists encourages students to think about what they want to say and helps them craft how they want to say it.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hill, L. (PI)

TAPS 20A: Acting for Non-Majors

A class designed for all interested students. Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text. This version of the class is offered in summer only. During the year, students should register for TAPS 124D.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 21: StoryCraft

StoryCraft is a hands-on, experiential workshop offering participants the opportunity, structure and guidance to craft compelling personal stories to be shared in front of a live audience. The class will focus on several areas of storytelling: Mining (how do you find your stories and extract the richest details?); Crafting (how do you structure the content and shape the language?); and Performing (how do you share your stories with presence, authenticity and connection?).
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, D. (PI)

TAPS 30: Introduction to Theatrical Design

Introduction to Theatrical Design is aimed at students interested in exploring the fundamentals of design for the stage. Students are introduced to the practical and theoretical basics of design and are challenged to answer the question: What makes good design? Students should expect to try their hand at communicating their ideas visually through research, drawing, sketching and model making. Readings, field trips, guest lecturers and class discussion will complement these projects. This course is intended as a gateway to more specialized courses in set, costume and lighting design and is also an excellent primer for actors, directors and scholars who wish to know more about design. Collaboration will be emphasized. No prior experience in these areas is necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 41N: Inventing Modern Theatre: Georg B├╝chner and Frank Wedekind

The German writers Georg Büchner (1813-1837) and Frank Wedekind (1864-1918). Many of the most important theater and film directors of the last century, including Max Reinhardt, G. W. Pabst, Orson Welles, Robert Wilson, and Werner Herzog, have wrestled with their works, as have composers and writers from Alban Berg and Bertolt Brecht through Christa Wolf and Thalia Field. Rock artists as diverse as Tom Waits, Lou Reed, Duncan Sheik, and Metallica have recently rediscovered their urgency. Reading these works in translation and examining artistic creations they inspired. Classroom discussions and written responses; students also rehearse and present in-class performances of excerpts from the plays. The aim of these performances is not to produce polished stagings but to creatively engage with the texts and their interpretive traditions. No previous theatrical experience required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 42: Costume Construction

Course will cover the basics of costume and garment construction. Includes hand and machine skills as well as basic patterning ideas that may be applied to more advanced projects. Lecture/Lab
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Strayer, C. (PI)

TAPS 101P: Theater and Performance Making (TAPS 371P)

A creative workshop offering a range of generative exercises and techniques in order to devise, compose and perform original works. Students will explore a variety of texts (plays, poems, short stories, paintings) and work with the body, object and site. nnStudents will be encouraged to think critically about various compositional themes and ideas including: the relationship between form and content, aesthetics, space, proximity, and audience. Students will work independently and collaboratively creating original performances.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 103: Beginning Improvising

The improvisational theater techniques that teach spontaneity, cooperation, team building, and rapid problem solving, emphasizing common sense, attention to reality, and helping your partner. Based on TheatreSports by Keith Johnstone. Readings, papers, and attendance at performances of improvisational theater. Limited enrollment. Improv, Improvisation, creativity and creative expression. All who sign up are placed on a waitlist. Official enrollment will be determined after the first day of class. Attendance at the first class session is mandatory to be considered for enrollment in the course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 115: Musical Theater (MUSIC 183D)

In this workshop we will traverse the landscape of world of Musical Theater. It will serve as an introduction for the beginning actor and singer, and expand the more experienced performer's range in this genre. The world of Musical Theater is filled with stories of love, passion, joy, violence, heartbreak and rage. The class will include an introduction to vocal and movement skills for musical theater, beginning with exercises to build an ensemble and encourage a sense of play and relaxation in supportive environment. Our class must be a place where everyone feels safe. As ensemble members, we will be responsible for each other in this environment. nnStudents will choose one solo song, and perform in a group number from this exciting discipline. The instructor will work with the actors on technique, utilization of action, specificity of language, personalization, and emotional truth. A professional coach from the theater community will conduct vocal coaching. Physical warm-ups and choreography will be suited for both the dancer and non-dancer.nnThe class will culminate in the last week with live performance for friends and family.nnSTUDENTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO BRING THEIR OWN SUGGESTIONS. (Isn't there a role you've always wanted to sing?)nnRequired text: Broadway Musicals Show by Show: Sixth Edition - Stanley Green; Paperback
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Amarotico, K. (PI)

TAPS 120A: Acting I: Fundamentals of Acting

A substantive introduction to the basics of the craft of acting, this course gives all incoming students the foundation of a common vocabulary. Students will learn fundamental elements of dramatic analysis, and how to apply it in action. Topics include scene analysis, environment work, psychological and physical scoring, and development of a sound and serviceable rehearsal technique. Scene work will be chosen from accessible, contemporary, and realistic plays. Outside rehearsal time required.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Amarotico, K. (PI)

TAPS 120B: Acting II: Advanced Acting

Learn how to expand character work, beyond what is immediately familiar. Continuing basic practices from the first part of the sequence, in this quarter they will look beyond the strictly contemporary, and may begin to approach roles drawn from more challenging dramatic texts. This might include plays chosen from mid-century American classics, World Theater, or other works with specific historic or cultural requirements. Actors begin to learn how a performing artist researches and how that research can be used to enrich and deepen performance. Prerequisite: 120A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Freed, A. (PI)

TAPS 121C: Physical Characterization

A practical course in movement, acting and character development for stage or screen. This course is appropriate for all artists; no prior movement training is required. We will explore expressive possibilities in the body in order to build characters with nuanced physicality and rich emotional life. Students will learn strategies for awakening the body, find a greater range of expression, and widen the variety of characters they can inhabit. We will conduct live observations and take inspiration from photographs, memories, dramatic texts and other sources to build vivid portraits of character in performance. Actors will work independently and as an ensemble, learning techniques derived from Michael Chekhov. We will also practice physical conditioning for the actor through a daily warm-up sequence that improves strength, flexibility and alignment.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 121V: Voice for the Actor

This course will focus on releasing a voice that effectively reaches the listener and is responsive to the actor¿s thoughts and feelings. Through work on breath awareness, alignment, resonance, and muscularity, students will learn to identify habits that help or hinder performance. Students will practice exercises to develop vocal strength, clarity, ease, and expressiveness while exploring the vocal demands of various texts and performing environments. Course will culminate in a presentation of classical and contemporary monologues. This course is a good preparation for auditions, rehearsal, and performance, and is appropriate for all levels. Priority space reserved for TAPS majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 122P: Undergrad Performance Project: Life is a Dream

The Undergraduate Performance Project provides students the opportunity to study and perform in major dramatic works. The Winter 2018 Undergraduate Performance Project presents Life is a Dream. Students learn to form an artistic ensemble, develop dramaturgical materials, learn professional arts protocols and practice, devise within the ensemble, and develop live performance ability. Audition required. Preference to majors/minors. Maybe repeated for credit. 3 maximum completions allowed. If repeated, 15 total units allowed.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-9 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 124D: Acting for Non-Majors

Formerly TAPS 20. Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 126: Sound Stories

This special seminar is designed for students interested in creating stories for radio, podcast, and other sound media. Students will learn both the core principles of telling strong stories, whatever the medium, and the strategies of telling entertaining, persuasive stories for the ear. Just like film or the novel, sonic stories offer a fascinating mix of constraints and opportunities, and you¿ll learn how to invite listeners into an experience or insight that combines theories, facts and feelings into a single space of empathy. This is a hybrid class¿equal parts classic seminar and creative workshop¿and students will create stories from start to finish and learn skills from pitching and interviewing to writing, editing, and digital production. Students will work in small groups to document places through the stories that inhabit them¿from the Menlo Park Police department to local shelters and community centers. Recommended for students interested in creative nonfiction, documentary, film, and even sound art. No prior experience necessary. Students wishing to enroll in this course must complete the following survey: nhttp://web.stanford.edu/~jwarga/S17TAPS126.fb (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 127: Movement for the Actor

This course is an exploration of movement techniques for the actor, designed to provide a foundation for performance practice. Students will develop a more grounded sense of ease and breath onstage, learn fundamentals of physical partnership, and acquire an expanded physical vocabulary. Areas of study include Laban movement analysis, observation and embodiment, basic contact improvisation, and physical characterization. Students will also engage a personalized warmup process for rehearsal and performance. All coursework will be entirely experiential, practical, and participatory. No previous experience necessary. Some outside rehearsal/investigation time required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chapman, M. (PI)

TAPS 127S: Acting Through Song

How does a singer develop the strategies to shape nuanced, emotional performances? What clues does the singer mine from lyrics and a score in order to communicate through song? This is a studio course in acting and movement techniques for vocal performers who want to expand their expressive range, refine multi-faceted performances, and cultivate compelling stage presence. nnThis course is suitable for any vocalist; classical singers, a cappella performers, musical theater actors and others are all welcome. The three foundational underpinnings of our work will be actor personalization technique, basic movement training and text analysis strategies. We will develop flexibility, relaxation and the freedom to follow expressive impulses while also deepening our knowledge of character, narrative and theme.nnStudents should be prepared to engage in intensive work with performance pieces, selected according to each student¿s preferred style and tradition. We will focus on close textual analysis and find connections between the ways performers use various written scores (for spoken dialogue, song lyrics and musical composition) as the blueprints for dynamic performances that tell a powerful story. The course will culminate in a public performance of material from a musical performance genre.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 130: ReDesigning Theater: Live & Digital Performance

This quarter¿s version of ReDesigning Theater looks at Live and Digital Performance. We will examine the use of digital technology in collaboration with live performance. Students will learn and employ the design thinking process as well as improv and theatrical techniques. We aim to create user-centric, interactive experiences where technology enables the audience to become part of and/or influence the outcome of the story or its presentation. Student projects will begin with the concepts enabled by personal technology such as smart phones and expand to animation, video projection, and other media. Students will work in small groups to investigate and experiment with formats that blur the lines between live and digital, performer and audience, and physical and virtual platforms. This project-based course is accessible to students of all backgrounds interested in exploring and transforming the frontiers of technology, art, and live performance.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 132: Costume Design

This course introduces the goals, directives and techniques of designing costumes for performance. From the first reading of the script to opening night, all aspects will be covered including director/designer relationships, design approach, research, rendering, fabric selection, procurement or construction of costumes, fittings and final dress rehearsals. Each student will work on, or be assigned one main project of their choice. This class can coincide or be taken in advance of a student¿s involvement in a campus show, utilizing the campus project as their main project in the class. Smaller exercises will be given throughout the quarter to emphasize principles and invigorate design discussions. All students will be required to attend the performances of their peers¿ projects. One field trip to a professional theater may be planned.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Strayer, C. (PI)

TAPS 133: Stage Scenery Design

Craft and Theory of stage scenery design including visual research, spatial organization, basic drafting, sketching and model-building. Prerequisite: 30, or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 156: Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson (AFRICAAM 156, CSRE 156T, TAPS 356)

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 170: Directing and Dramaturgy: Composition and Adaptation for Theatre (TAPS 370)

This course explores dramaturgy and directing in the research and production of theatre primarily through practical creative projects with secondary readings on dramaturgy as a discipline. In this course we will consider the role of the dramaturg in its broadest sense, running across theatrical production from research to playwriting, adaptation, choreography, devising and directing. Students will work individually and in small groups researching, adapting, crafting and workshopping material.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 170A: The Director's Craft (TAPS 370A)

This workshop class guides students through the directing process from investigating the big ideas of a play and analysing the action to organizing and running rehearsals to building up the world of the play through character work and visual composition. Over the quarter we will look at the use of creative visualization and improvisation alongside working with actors on ideas, emotions, relationships, textual analysis and blocking. This course also attends to the process of communicating with designers and production teams as well as structuring rehearsals, run-throughs and technical and dress rehearsals. Each student will select a theatrical text to work from across the quarter. In many cases the student¿s text will be a play that they are planning to direct in future, such as productions for student groups like Ram¿s Head or Stanford Shakespeare Company, TAPS capstone projects, TAPS 2nd year grad shows and/or TAPS Second Stage productions. No previous directing experience in necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hill, L. (PI)

TAPS 170B: Directing Workshop: The Actor-Director Dialogue (TAPS 372)

This course focuses on the actor-director dialogue. We will work with actors and directors developing approaches to collaboration that make the actor-director dialogue in theater.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rehm, R. (PI)

TAPS 171: Performance Making (TAPS 371)

A studio course focused on creative processes and generating original material. Students will be encouraged to think critically about the relationship between form and content exploring the possibilities of site specific, gallery and theatre settings. Students will reflect throughout on the types of contact and communication uniquely possible in the live moment, such as interaction or the engagement of the senses. The emphasis is on weekly experimentation in the creation of short works rather than on a final production.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 173D: Theater Production Lab: Dramaturgy and Development (TAPS 373)

173/373: In this course students will explore general dramaturgical history and methodology as well as engaging in applied dramaturgy from evaluating works for a productions seasons, to developing dramaturgical materials for specific productions. Students will agree the focus of their course-work with the instructor depending on their specific interests. The TAPS 2nd year grad students enrolled in this course will act as a dramaturgical team, supporting the TAPS winter production of The Tempest in Pigott Theater March 2-11 2017, directed by Amy Freed. Students will support the actors and the creative team through providing research materials and presentations and helping actors with guided research, write program essays for general audiences, attend rehearsals and provide constructive notes, and curate and/or present on a Preface panel prior to opening night.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 174V: Staging Change: from A Doll's House to Votes for Women!

A practice-led exploration of women in theater at the rise of feminism and realism: 75% workshop 25% seminar with 2 public table reads and a class production (play TBD depending on class size and constituency) to be staged in Roble or Pigott theater at the end of Fall quarter. Students will use Hill's new book Sex, Suffrage and the Stage (2017) for historical context in their readings and scene work on 12 iconic plays that transformed stage representations of women, including A Doll's House, The Notorious Mrs Ebbsmith, A Woman of No Importance, Mrs Warren's Profession and Votes for Women!
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 176N: The Inside Story

The Inside Story is a workshop that focuses on the generation of autobiographical material by exploring the connections between biology and biography. Students will gather autobiological and autobiographical material, investigate stories of their bodies and explore `gut feelings¿. They will work on individual and group exercises looking at cellular and body memory from which they will create text, gesture, image, performance and installation. The exercises will include autobiographical writing prompts, body memory exercises, Yin Yoga, and body mapping.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Paris, H. (PI)

TAPS 177: Dramatic Writing: The Fundamentals (CSRE 177, FEMGEN 177, TAPS 277)

Course introduces students to the basic elements of playwriting and creative experimentation for the stage. Topics include: character development, conflict and plot construction, staging and setting, and play structure. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Marsha Norman, Patrick Shanley, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Paula Vogel, Octavio Solis and others. Table readings of one-act length work required by quarter's end.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 177W: Workshop with Young Jean Lee (TAPS 277W)

Instructor Young Jean Lee is a playwright and director who will have two plays premiering on Broadway in 2018-2019. Students will collaborate on the development of one of these plays.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 178B: Intensive Playwriting (CSRE 178B, TAPS 278)

Intermediate level study of fundamentals of playwriting through an intensive play development process. Course emphasizes visual scripting for the stage and play revision. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Suzan-Lori Parks, Tony Kushner, Adrienne Kennedy, Edward Albee, Maria Irene Fornes and others. Table readings of full length work required by quarter¿s end.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 178C: Writing a Full-Length Play (TAPS 278C)

Instructor Young Jean Lee is a playwright and director who will have two plays premiering on Broadway in 2018-2019. This workshop will guide students through the process of writing a full-length play, and will focus on helping students to find their own voices. Students will be required to write every week and share their work with the class, completing a full-length first draft by the end of the term. This class will be geared towards generating new material, rather than on editing in response to critiques, which will be covered in a spring course, EDITING A FULL-LENGTH PLAY. Topics to be discussed: the relationship between naturalistic and experimental theater; writing about unfamiliar subjects; and writing what you are afraid to write. Students must contact the instructor at yjl@stanford.edu ASAP in order to obtain an application for the class, which will be due on December 1.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 180P: Color (ARTSTUDI 180)

Hands-on study of color to develop color sensitivity and the ability to manipulate color to exploit its expressive potential. Guided experimentation and observation. Topics include color relativity, color and light, color mixing, color harmony, and color and content. (lower level)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 210V: Vocal Production and Audition

An introductory study of the vocal mechanism and the development of voice and articulation for the stage. Students will be introduced to the actor's tools of phonetics, verbal action and text analysis. Vocal technique will then be applied to the actor's process in preparation for audition. Actors will fully participate in the audition process, from beginning to end. Emphasis will be on relaxation, selection of appropriate material, and versatility to show contrast and range.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 278: Intensive Playwriting (CSRE 178B, TAPS 178B)

Intermediate level study of fundamentals of playwriting through an intensive play development process. Course emphasizes visual scripting for the stage and play revision. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Suzan-Lori Parks, Tony Kushner, Adrienne Kennedy, Edward Albee, Maria Irene Fornes and others. Table readings of full length work required by quarter¿s end.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

THINK 21: Folklore and Literature in Russia and Beyond: Vampires, Talking Cats, and Frog Princesses

What is 'folklore' and what is its purpose? How do we decide if something is authentically 'folk' and does it matter? Why are Eastern Europe and Russia associated with the idea of folklore? For the past two centuries, writers, composers, and artists have found inspiration in folklore: the stories, songs, and beliefs of their grandparents, their servants (or their slaves), and their neighbors. This class asks what folklore means and what purposes - political and philosophical as well as artistic - it can serve. We begin with examples from around the world: the German Brothers Grimm as well as the Americans John and Alan Lomax. Then we turn to Eastern Europe and the role it has played in the Western European and American imagination as the home of the archaic and the authentic, from the vampires of Transylvania to the oral epics of the Bosnian Serbs to the nostalgic idea of the Jewish shtetl to the fantasy of Soviet communism as a survival of a pre-capitalist order. Students will analyze both folk and elite texts, and will experiment with gathering oral texts and transforming them just like the writers we studied.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

THINK 49: Stories Everywhere

Do we perceive the world through stories? Are we made of stories? Can we make sense of the world without narrative? The telling of stories is not just a form of entertainment but an essential human activity that moves and persuades us, compelling us to action and reflection. In this course, we will probe how moral, cognitive and historical forces give stories their power. You will be introduced to the basic theory and art of storytelling, enabling you to understand and master the fundamentals of narrative structure, plot, and character. This will allow you to practice producing your own stories through both interpretative and creative writing assignments. The class will also give students the chance to participate in various story-making activities and work with the Stanford Storytelling Project, San Francisco StoryCorps, School of the Arts and the Stanford Innocence Project to create assignments that would be useful to both private and nonprofit organizations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

THINK 50: Empathy

This course will introduce freshmen to a range of ways of thinking about empathy. How do we know and understand the other? How does knowledge of another's experience and circumstances enable us to make moral decisions and take moral actions? It will take students on an intellectual investigation of the topic of empathy from the Buddhist emphasis on compassion in the fifth century BCE to Jesus' teaching of parables in the first century CE to Enlightenment philosophy to Silicon Valley¿s adoption of empathy in the twenty-first century. The main focus will be on the modern period (from the 18th to 20th century) and students will be asked to approach different genres of text through the lens of empathy. The course will culminate with a one-week creative workshop on the question of empathy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Shaw, J. (PI)

URBANST 113: Introduction to Urban Design: Contemporary Urban Design in Theory and Practice

Comparative studies in neighborhood conservation, inner city regeneration, and growth policies for metropolitan regions. Lect-disc and research focusing on case studies from North America and abroad, team urban design projects. Two Saturday class workshops in San Francisco: 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the quarter. Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 171: Urban Design Studio (CEE 131D)

The practical application of urban design theory. Projects focus on designing neighborhood and downtown regions to balance livability, revitalization, population growth, and historic preservation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Glanz, D. (PI)
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