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TAPS 1: Introduction to Theater and Performance Studies

TAPS 1 provides you with a solid foundation in Theater Studies and traces the development of the burgeoning field of Performance Studies. We will consider a range of canonical plays and emerging performance forms, and explore how performance can also function as an interpretive framework for analyzing a broad range of social behaviors, sites, and institutions. Through a series of close readings, discussions, written and practical exercises, and viewings of live performance, this course will help you achieve a richer understanding of the performances you see and the performances you may wish to make. This quarter, TAPS 1 will serve as the platform for the Theater & Performance Studies professionalization series. We will host several guest speakers (directors, actors, playwrights, and dance practitioners), who will give you some real connections in the theater world and will provide you with information and skills to help you build a career in the arts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Looser, D. (PI)

TAPS 11Q: Art in the Metropolis (ARTSINST 11Q)

This seminar is offered in conjunction with the annual "Arts Immersion" trip to New York that takes place over the spring break and is organized by the Stanford Arts Institute (SAI). Participation in the trip is a requirement for taking part in the seminar (and vice versa). The trip is designed to provide a group of students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in the cultural life of New York City guided by faculty and the SAI programming director. Students will experience a broad range and variety of art forms (visual arts, theater, opera, dance, etc.) and will meet with prominent arts administrators and practitioners, some of whom are Stanford alumni. For further details and updates about the trip, see http://arts.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Phelan, P. (PI)

TAPS 21: StoryCraft

StoryCraft is a hands-on, experiential workshop offering participants the opportunity, structure and guidance to craft compelling personal stories to be shared in front of a live audience. The class will focus on several areas of storytelling: Mining (how do you find your stories and extract the richest details?); Crafting (how do you structure the content and shape the language?); and Performing (how do you share your stories with presence, authenticity and connection?).
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Darby, M. (PI); Klein, D. (PI)

TAPS 21S: StoryCraft: On Sexuality (FEMGEN 21S)

This class prepares students to tell their stories in front of the Beyond Sex Ed audiences in three performances for all freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, Fall 2017. What is sexuality education? In this class, you will learn about sexuality from the inside-out. We will examine social discourses that shape our understanding of sexuality and then dive into an experiential workshop to discover the many facets of sexuality through the art of story -- our own and others. Due to the sensitive nature of the topic, we will emphasize safety, trust, and confidentiality throughout. The class will offer you the structure and guidance to 1) mine your lives for stories, 2) craft the structure and shape, and 3) perform with presence, authenticity, and connection.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Booth, B. (PI); Darby, M. (PI)

TAPS 22: Scene Work

For actors who complete substantial scene work with graduate directors in the graduate workshop.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 29: Theater Performance: Acting

Students cast in department productions receive credit for their participation as actors; 1-2 units for graduate directing workshop projects and 1-3 units for major productions (units determined by instructor). May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Elam, H. (PI)

TAPS 39: Theater Crew

For students working backstage, on run crew, or in the theater shops on TAPS department productions. Night and weekend time required. Pre-approval from Laxmi Kumaran (laxmik@stanford.edu) required for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 39D: Small Project Stage Management

For students Stage Mananging a TAPS Senior Project or Assistant Stage Managing a TAPS department production. Pre-approval by Laxmi Kumaran (laxmik@stanford.edu) required for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 103: Beginning Improvising

The improvisational theater techniques that teach spontaneity, cooperation, team building, and rapid problem solving, emphasizing common sense, attention to reality, and helping your partner. Based on TheatreSports by Keith Johnstone. Readings, papers, and attendance at performances of improvisational theater. Limited enrollment. Improv, Improvisation, creativity and creative expression.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 104: Intermediate Improvisation

This class is the continued study of improvisational theater with a focus on stage skills, short and long form performance formats, and offstage applications of collaborative creativity. It is open to any students who have taken TAPS 103 or have previous onstage improv experience AND consent of the instructor. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, D. (PI)

TAPS 115: Musical Theater

In this workshop we will traverse the landscape of world of Musical Theater. It will serve as an introduction for the beginning actor and singer, and expand the more experienced performer¿s range in this genre. The world of Musical Theater is filled with stories of love, passion, joy, violence, heartbreak and rage. The class will include an introduction to vocal and movement skills for musical theater, beginning with exercises to build an ensemble and encourage a sense of play and relaxation in supportive environment. Our class must be a place where everyone feels safe. As ensemble members, we will be responsible for each other in this environment. nnStudents will choose one solo song, and perform in a group number from this exciting discipline. The instructor will work with the actors on technique, utilization of action, specificity of language, personalization, and emotional truth. A professional coach from the theater community will conduct vocal coaching. Physical warm-ups and choreography will be suited for both the dancer and non-dancer.n nThe class will culminate in the last week with live performance for friends and family.nnSTUDENTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO BRING THEIR OWN SUGGESTIONS. (Isn¿t there a role you¿ve always wanted to sing?)nnRequired text: Broadway Musicals Show by Show: Sixth Edition - Stanley Green; Paperback
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 119: Modern Theatre (GERMAN 119, GERMAN 319, TAPS 319)

Modern theatre in Europe and the US, with a focus on the most influential works from roughly 1880 to the present. What were the conventions of theatrical practice that modern theatre displaced? What were the principal innovations of modern playwriting, acting, stage design, and theatrical architecture? How did modern theatrical artists wrestle with the revolutionary transformations of the modern age? Plays by Büchner, Ibsen, Strindberg, Shaw, Chekhov, Wilde, Wedekind, Treadwell, Pirandello, Brecht, O¿Neill, Beckett, Smith, Parks, and Nottage.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, M. (PI)

TAPS 124D: Acting for Non-Majors

Formerly TAPS 20. Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 126: Sound Stories

This special seminar is designed for students interested in creating stories for radio, podcast, and other sound media. Students will learn both the core principles of telling strong stories, whatever the medium, and the strategies of telling entertaining, persuasive stories for the ear. Just like film or the novel, sonic stories offer a fascinating mix of constraints and opportunities, and you¿ll learn how to invite listeners into an experience or insight that combines theories, facts and feelings into a single space of empathy. This is a hybrid class¿equal parts classic seminar and creative workshop¿and students will create stories from start to finish and learn skills from pitching and interviewing to writing, editing, and digital production. Students will work in small groups to document places through the stories that inhabit them¿from the Menlo Park Police department to local shelters and community centers. Recommended for students interested in creative nonfiction, documentary, film, and even sound art. No prior experience necessary. Students wishing to enroll in this course must complete the following survey: nhttp://web.stanford.edu/~jwarga/S17TAPS126.fb (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Warga, J. (PI)

TAPS 127C: Introduction to Stage Combat

A course designed to cover the fundamental techniques to safely and convincingly create the illusion of violence. Stressing safety, storytelling, and partnering, this class will explore the most commonly used unarmed combat techniques, including fighting with found objects and comedic violence. Additionally, students will explore the essential techniques and vocabulary for theatrical broadsword including parries, cuts, thrusts, footwork and evasions. Students will have the opportunity to take a "skills proficiency test" in both disciplines for recognition as a beginning theatrical combatant with Dueling Arts International. This class will be taught by Dave Maier.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 132: Costume Design

This course introduces the goals, directives and techniques of designing costumes for performance. From the first reading of the script to opening night, all aspects will be covered including director/designer relationships, design approach, research, rendering, fabric selection, procurement or construction of costumes, fittings and final dress rehearsals. Each student will work on, or be assigned one main project of their choice. This class can coincide or be taken in advance of a student¿s involvement in a campus show, utilizing the campus project as their main project in the class. Smaller exercises will be given throughout the quarter to emphasize principles and invigorate design discussions. All students will be required to attend the performances of their peers¿ projects. One field trip to a professional theater may be planned.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Strayer, C. (PI)

TAPS 133D: Set Design Practicum

This course is intended for students who are in the process of designing scenery for a Stanford club or department production and seek guidance in developing and refining their design. It is also open to students who have not yet committed to a fully realized set design project but would like to in the future, or anyone who would like to focus on the practical aspects of set design in general. Each week students present their work on a current or future set design and receive feedback and suggestions from classmates and the instructor. Also, the instructor will create project oriented assignments adapted to the needs and timeline of each individual project and student. Topics include: visual research, sketching, computer and hand drafting, and model making. During the first two weeks of the course students and instructor will determine a final project, such as a color model or design drafting, which will be required for completion of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Flatmo, E. (PI)

TAPS 134: Stage Management Project

For students stage managing a Department of Drama production.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 140: Introduction to Projects in Theatrical Production

A seminar course for students performing significant production work on Theater and Performance Studies Department or other Stanford University student theater projects. Students serving as producers, directors, designers or stage managers, who wish mentorship and credit for their production work sign up for this course and contact the instructor, Laxmi Kumaran. nPrerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 150T: Transnational Sexualities (CSRE 150T, FEMGEN 150T, FEMGEN 250T, TAPS 250T)

Transnational Sexualites is an inter-disciplinary course that considers the aesthetic, social, and political formation of sexual subjectivities in a global world. How does the transnational traffic of people, media, images, finance, and commodities shape the force-fields of desire? What is the relationship between political economies and libidinal economies? The course will explore the erotics of race and religion, neoliberalism and globalization within a wide range geo-political contexts including Indonesia, China, Egypt, India, South Africa, US, among others.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Menon, J. (PI)

TAPS 151T: Great Books: Dramatic Traditions (COMPLIT 151B, COMPLIT 351B, TAPS 351)

The most influential and enduring texts in the dramatic canon from Sophocles to Shakespeare, Chekhov to Soyinka. Their historical and geopolitical contexts. Questions about the power dynamics involved in the formation of canons. This course counts as a Writing in the Major course for TAPS in 2016-17.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Menon, J. (PI)

TAPS 153F: Performing Feeling (CSRE 153F, FEMGEN 153F)

This course explores the intersections of performance and feeling through a wide geographical and historical range of theories, texts, and performances. We will examine how performance and feeling relate to one another by surveying a broad spectrum of performance and performance theory, with special attention to race, gender, and sexuality.These explorations will serve as grounds for richer understandings of performance as well as expanded artistic vocabularies in performing feeling.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 154P: Stage Physics and Chemical Theaters: Science & Contemporary Performance

Michael Frayn's Copenhagen and Tom Stoppard's Arcadia are celebrated examples of science plays, drama that draws upon scientific history and/or theories within its structure and content. These plays generate conversation and at times controversy regarding the accuracy of scientific and historical representation as well as the relationship between theater and science. How should theater reimagine and embody scientific practice? How should science engage with the dynamism of theater? In this course, we will examine how modern and contemporary science plays imagine the scientific past, ruminate on scientists, and educate the audience. We will explore questions of genre, pedagogy, and dramatic form in the plays composition. Readings on science communication and selected scientific theories will accompany the primary texts. Students will have an opportunity to pursue a creative project in the course. Plays may include works by Bertolt Brecht, Carl Djerassi, Michael Frayn, Lauren Gunderson, Chiori Miyazawa, Cassandra Medley, Shelagh Stephenson, and Tom Stoppard.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robinson, A. (PI)

TAPS 157X: Borders, Performance, and Human Rights (CSRE 157X)

How have artists and activists have used performance to raise vital questions about citizenship, identity, community, and human agency in migrant contexts? In this class, we will examine a range of theatre and performance pieces from across the globe that address urgent issues of migration and border-crossing, including experiences of refugees, asylum seekers, and environmental migrants. We will study the various aesthetic strategies that performance-makers have used to tell these stories, their outreach to audiences, and the political potential of their work. The course blends readings of critical and creative texts with practical workshops to give participants the opportunity to develop their own performances as well as written work.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Looser, D. (PI)

TAPS 162Z: Dance on the Move: Migration, Border Zones, and Citizenship (CSRE 162Z, DANCE 162Z)

Dance on the Move is an introductory-level course that considers dance performance and practice as sites for examining the mobilities/immobilities that shape transnational migration and citizenship. We examine how (im)migrant bodies as subjects constructed through political-economic relations of race, gender, sexuality, class, nationality, and religion negotiate, contest, and affirm experiences of belonging/unbelonging in daily life and artistic practice across diverse geographical sites. Students will conduct a small ethnographic project with a dance community that relates to the theme, such as social dance events or student dance groups. Students will produce either a written- or a hybrid written/performance- ethnography as their final project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Akbarzadeh, H. (PI)

TAPS 179G: Indigenous Identity in Diaspora: Women of Color Art Practice in América (CSRE 179G, CSRE 279G, FEMGEN 179G, NATIVEAM 179G, TAPS 279G)

This course is part of the core curriculum of the IDA emphasis in CSRE. This year it will focus on the art and art practice of women of color in the areas of literature, visual art and the performing arts. Through readings, screenings, on and off campus events, and visiting artists, the course will examine the aesthetics, cultural inquiries, and related politics of Indigenous-identified women artists (especially but not limited to Xicana, Northern Native and African American). Issues of gender and sexuality in relation to cultural identity are also integral to this exploration. Students will be required to produce a mid-term and final work, integrating the critical concepts of the course into creative projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moraga, C. (PI)

TAPS 190: Special Research

Individual project on the work of a playwright, period, or genre. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 191: Independent Study

Individual supervision of off-campus internship. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (AMSTUD 197, DANCE 197)

This class works collaboratively with a local juvenile hall to use civic engagement and performance to explore the aesthetic, cultural and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration on an immediate and personal scale. Taught jointly by a Dance Studies scholar and a lawyer specializing in Juvenile Justice, we will consider what unique understandings are possible if we position the arts as central to an exploration of punishment, rehabilitation and recidivism in America. The course will examine case studies, historical and contemporary narratives about the social, imaginative and behavioral change possible through arts programs in prison.Half of the class meetings will be in Hillcrest Juvenile Hall in San Mateo, where our class will join with a group of 13-18 year old youths currently detained there. Dance will be used to help shape their individual expressive voices, and ours, through collaborative hip hop dance classes. Books to be read are Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson, and Last Chance in Texas by John Hubner.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ross, J. (PI)

TAPS 200: Senior Project

All TAPS Majors must complete a Senior Project that represents significant work in any area of theater and/or performance. The project must be an original contribution and can consist of any of the following: devising a performance, choreographing a dance, stage managing a production, designing a large theater work, performing a major role, writing a play, directing a show, or researching and writing a senior essay. Work for this project normally begins in Spring Quarter of the junior year and must be completed by the end of the senior year. Students receive credit for senior projects through TAPS 200. A minimum of 4 units is required, but additional units are available for larger projects. Students pursuing senior projects must submit a two-page proposal to a faculty advisor of their choice, which must be approved by the Undergraduate Advisor and the department faculty no later than the end of Spring Quarter of the junior year.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 201A: Honors Colloquium

See "Undergraduate Programs" for description.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 201D: Honors Colloquium

See "Undergraduate Programs" for description.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 231: Advanced Stage Lighting Design

Individually structured class in lighting mechanics and design through experimentation, discussions, and written reports. Prerequisite: 131 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 232: Advanced Costume Design

Individually structured tutorial for costume designers. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 132 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 233: Advanced Scene Design

Individually structured workshop. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 133 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Flatmo, E. (PI)

TAPS 234: Advanced Stage Management Project

For students stage managing a Department of Drama production. Prerequisite: 134.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-9 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 250T: Transnational Sexualities (CSRE 150T, FEMGEN 150T, FEMGEN 250T, TAPS 150T)

Transnational Sexualites is an inter-disciplinary course that considers the aesthetic, social, and political formation of sexual subjectivities in a global world. How does the transnational traffic of people, media, images, finance, and commodities shape the force-fields of desire? What is the relationship between political economies and libidinal economies? The course will explore the erotics of race and religion, neoliberalism and globalization within a wide range geo-political contexts including Indonesia, China, Egypt, India, South Africa, US, among others.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Menon, J. (PI)

TAPS 279G: Indigenous Identity in Diaspora: Women of Color Art Practice in América (CSRE 179G, CSRE 279G, FEMGEN 179G, NATIVEAM 179G, TAPS 179G)

This course is part of the core curriculum of the IDA emphasis in CSRE. This year it will focus on the art and art practice of women of color in the areas of literature, visual art and the performing arts. Through readings, screenings, on and off campus events, and visiting artists, the course will examine the aesthetics, cultural inquiries, and related politics of Indigenous-identified women artists (especially but not limited to Xicana, Northern Native and African American). Issues of gender and sexuality in relation to cultural identity are also integral to this exploration. Students will be required to produce a mid-term and final work, integrating the critical concepts of the course into creative projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moraga, C. (PI)

TAPS 290: Special Research

Individual project on the work of a playwright, period, or genre.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Looser, D. (PI)

TAPS 314: Performing Identities (CSRE 314, FEMGEN 314)

This course examines claims and counter-claims of identity, a heated political and cultural concept over the past few decades. We will consider the ways in which theories of performance have offered generative discursive frameworks for the study of identities, variously shaped by vectors of race, gender, sexuality, religion, class, nation, ethnicity, among others. How is identity as a social category different from identity as a unique and personal attribute of selfhood? Throughout the course we will focus on the inter-locking ways in which certain dimensions of identity become salient at particular historical conjunctures. In addition, we will consider the complex discourses of identity within transnational and historical frameworks. Readings include Robin Bernstein, Ann Pellegrini, Tavia Nyong¿o, Jose Munoz, Michael Taussig, Wendy Brown, Talal Asad, Jasbir Puar, among others.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brody, J. (PI)

TAPS 315: Dramaturgy

In this seminar, we will take the conventional idea of dramaturgy for narrative performance as developed in Western European theater since the enlightenment, and investigate its relation to non-narrative forms of performance in 20th and 21st (performance art, conceptual dance). Further, we will use dramaturgical procedures to explore the ideological content of performance and position of art institutions in our society. Finally, the students will get acquainted with production dramaturgy and get necessary tools to take the role of dramaturgs in actual performance productions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jakovljevic, B. (PI)

TAPS 319: Modern Theatre (GERMAN 119, GERMAN 319, TAPS 119)

Modern theatre in Europe and the US, with a focus on the most influential works from roughly 1880 to the present. What were the conventions of theatrical practice that modern theatre displaced? What were the principal innovations of modern playwriting, acting, stage design, and theatrical architecture? How did modern theatrical artists wrestle with the revolutionary transformations of the modern age? Plays by Büchner, Ibsen, Strindberg, Shaw, Chekhov, Wilde, Wedekind, Treadwell, Pirandello, Brecht, O¿Neill, Beckett, Smith, Parks, and Nottage.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, M. (PI)

TAPS 335: Introduction to Graduate Production

This course introduces first-year TAPS PhD student to the TAPS production process and resources. Meetings will be scheduled ad hoc.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sunderman, E. (PI)

TAPS 351: Great Books: Dramatic Traditions (COMPLIT 151B, COMPLIT 351B, TAPS 151T)

The most influential and enduring texts in the dramatic canon from Sophocles to Shakespeare, Chekhov to Soyinka. Their historical and geopolitical contexts. Questions about the power dynamics involved in the formation of canons. This course counts as a Writing in the Major course for TAPS in 2016-17.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Menon, J. (PI)

TAPS 377: Graduate Directors' Staged Reading Project

Presentation of a new or newly adapted work for the stage, in a mode employed in professional theater for the development of new plays. Two to four rehearsals. Public performance.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 390: Directed Reading

Students may take directing reading only with the permission of their dissertation advisor. Might be repeatable for credit twice for 6 units total.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 802: TGR Dissertation

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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