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AFRICAAM 10A: Introduction to Identity, Diversity, and Aesthetics: Arts, Culture, and Pedagogy (CSRE 10A)

This weekly lecture series introduces students to the study of identity, diversity, and aesthetics through the work of leading artists and scholars affiliated with the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA). This year's course highlights the educational impact of arts and culture. How can arts and culture help to advance pedagogies of liberation? Among other things, we will examine hip-hop education and how it illuminates ideas around culturally relevant and culturally sustaining pedagogies, indigenous knowledges, embodied knowledges, hip-hop feminisms, and community engaged research. We will look at case studies from East Palo Alto, CA and Cape Town, South Africa.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chang, J. (PI); Holt, A. (SI)

AFRICAAM 20A: Jazz Theory (MUSIC 20A)

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: 19 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nadel, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 28: Health Impact of Sexual Assault and Relationship Abuse across the Lifecourse (HUMBIO 28)

Cross-listed with SOMGEN 237 and FEMGEN 237. HumBio students must enroll in HumBio 28 or AFRICAAM 28. An overview of the acute and chronic physical and psychological health impact of sexual abuse through the perspective of survivors of childhood, adolescent, young and middle adult, and elder abuse, including special populations such as pregnant women, military and veterans, prison inmates, individuals with mental or physical impairments. Also addresses: race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other demographic and societal factors, including issues specific to college culture. Professionals with expertise in sexual assault present behavioral and prevention efforts such as bystander intervention training, medical screening, counseling and other interventions to manage the emotional trauma of abuse. Undergraduates must enroll for 3 units. Medical and graduate students should enroll in SOMGEN 237 for 1-3 units. To receive a letter grade in any listing, students must enroll for 3 units. This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stefanick, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 30: The Egyptians (CLASSICS 82, HISTORY 48, HISTORY 148)

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 31: RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora

Students to engage in an intellectual discussion about the African Diaspora with leading faculty at Stanford across departments including Education, Linguistics, Sociology, History, Political Science, English, and Theater & Performance Studies. Several lunches with guest speakers. This course will meet in the Program for African & African American Studies Office in Building 360 Room 362B (Main Quad). This course is limited to Freshman and Sophomore enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Caruthers, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 37: Chocolate Heads Performance Project: Dance & Intercultural Performance Creation (DANCE 30)

Students from diverse dance styles (ballet to hip-hop to contemporary) participate in the dance-making/remix process and collaborate with musicians, visual artists, designers and spoken word artists, to co-create a multidisciplinary finished production and installation. Students of all dance or athletic backgrounds are welcome to audition on Wednesday, September 28th and Monday, October 4th during class time. Visual artists, musicians and dancers may also contact the instructor for further information at ahayes1@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 43: Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (AMSTUD 12A, ENGLISH 12A)

(Formerly English 43/143). In his bold study, What Was African American Literature?, Kenneth Warren defines African American literature as a late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century response to the nation's Jim Crow segregated order. But in the aftermath of the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement, can critics still speak, coherently, of "African American literature"? And how does this political conception of African American literary production compare with accounts grounded in black language and culture? Taking up Warren's intervention, this course will explore African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals and slave narratives to texts composed at the height of desegregation and decolonization struggles at mid-century and beyond.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rasberry, V. (PI)

AFRICAAM 47: History of South Africa (CSRE 74, HISTORY 47)

(Same as HISTORY 147. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Campbell, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 68D: Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Inner Life and Global Vision (AMSTUD 168D, CSRE 68, HISTORY 68D, HISTORY 168D)

Martin Luther King, Jr., was the 20th-century's best-known African-American leader, but the religious roots of his charismatic leadership are far less widely known. The documents assembled and published by Stanford's King Research and Education Institute provide the source materials for this exploration of King's swift rise to international prominence as an articulate advocate of global peace and justice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

AFRICAAM 94: Public Space in Iran: Murals, Graffiti, Performance

This course examines the history and traditions of artistic engagement in public space in Iran. It offers a unique glimpse into Iran's contemporary art and visual culture through the investigation of public art practices and cultural expression, as well as older traditions of performing arts such as Parde-khani and Ta zieh. The course will be held in conjunction with the Stanford symposium, Art, Social Space and Public Discourse in Iran.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 102B: Art and Social Criticism (AMSTUD 102, ARTHIST 162B, CSRE 102A, FEMGEN 102)

Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition¿s agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP¿s emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago¿s The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson¿s Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon¿s paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades feminist artists Barbara Kruger and the Guerilla Girls have combined institutional critique and direct address into a provocative form of criticality. Recent art for social justice is reaching ever broadening publics by redrawing the role of artist and audience exemplified by the democratization of poster making and internet campaigns of Occupy and the Movement for Black Lives. We will also consider the collective aesthetic activisms in the Post-Occupy era including Global Ultra Luxury Faction, Climate Justice art projects, and the visual culture of Trump era mass protests. Why are each of these examples successful as influential and enduring markers of social criticism? What have these socially responsive practices contributed to our understanding of American history?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hertz, B. (PI)

AFRICAAM 106: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI); Monroe, X. (TA)

AFRICAAM 130: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (CSRE 130, EDUC 123, EDUC 322)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 136B: White Identity Politics (ANTHRO 136B, CSRE 136)

Pundits proclaim that the 2016 Presidential election marks the rise of white identity politics in the United States. Drawing from the field of whiteness studies and from contemporary writings that push whiteness studies in new directions, this upper-level seminar asks, does white identity politics exist? How is a concept like white identity to be understood in relation to white nationalism, white supremacy, white privilege, and whiteness? We will survey the field of whiteness studies, scholarship on the intersection of race, class, and geography, and writings on whiteness in the United States by contemporary public thinkers, to critically interrogate the terms used to describe whiteness and white identities. Students will consider the perils and possibilities of different political practices, including abolishing whiteness or coming to terms with white identity. What is the future of whiteness? n*Enrolled students will be contacted regarding the location of the course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moran, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 146L: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Musics of Africa and the African Diaspora (AFRICAST 246L, MUSIC 146L, MUSIC 246L)

An introduction to musics of Africa and the African Diaspora. Topics include: music and nationalism, religion, embodiment, diaspora, migration, resistance, gender, globalization, and race. Musical regions and nations may include: Zimbabwe, South Africa, West Africa, Central Africa, Somalia, Ethiopia, the Caribbean, and the United States. This is a seminar-based course in which students will write short reflective papers and a final, research-based paper.Pre- or co-requisite for WIM credit: Music 22. WIM at 4 or 5 letter-graded units only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schultz, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 147: History of South Africa (CSRE 174, HISTORY 147)

(Same as HISTORY 47. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Campbell, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 160J: Conjure Art 101: Performances of Ritual, Spirituality and Decolonial Black Feminist Magic (CSRE 160J, DANCE 160J)

Conjure Art is a movement and embodied practice course looking at the work and techniques of artists of color who utilize spirituality and ritual practices in their art making and performance work to evoke social change. In this course we will discuss the work of artists who bring spiritual ritual in their art making while addressing issues of spiritual accountability and cultural appropriation. Throughout the quarter we will welcome guest artists who make work along these lines, while exploring movement, writing, singing and visual art making. This class will culminate in a performance ritual co-created by students and instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 194: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Contemporary Black Rhetorics: Black Twitter and Black Digital Cultures (PWR 194AJ)

Does not fulfill NSC requirement. This course will examine Black engagements with digital culture as sites for community building, social action and individual and collective identity formation. By studying phenomena like #BlackTwitter, memes, Vine, selfie culture, blogging, "social watching," and more, we will explore how Black technology use addresses questions like identity performance and expression, hyper visibility and invisibility of Black lives, Black feminisms, misogynoir and Black women/femme leadership in social movements, the roles and influence of Black Queer cultures online, and social activism and movements in online spaces. nnFrom #YouOKSis, #BlackLivesMatter and #AfroLatinidad to the Clapback, roasts and "reads," we will work from the serious to the silly, from individuals to collectives, from activism to everyday life, and from distinct Black cultures to diasporic connections and exchange. Participants in the course will create a social media autobiography, a "read/ing" of a Black cultural practice or phenomenon online, host an online discussion, and prepare a pitch for a longer research project they might pursue as a thesis or an ongoing study. Bring your GIFs, memes, and emoji, and a willingness to be in community both online and off for this new course! Prerequisite: first level of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Banks, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 200X: Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar

Required for seniors. Weekly colloquia with AAAS Director and Associate Director to assist with refinement of research topic, advisor support, literature review, research, and thesis writing. Readings include foundational and cutting-edge scholarship in the interdisciplinary fields of African and African American studies and comparative race studies. Readings assist students situate their individual research interests and project within the larger. Students may also enroll in AFRICAAM 200Y in Winter and AFRICAAM 200Z in Spring for additional research units (up to 10 units total).
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Caruthers, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 205K: The Age of Revolution: America, France, and Haiti (HISTORY 205K, HISTORY 305K)

This course examines the "Age of Revolution," spanning the 18th and 19th centuries. Primarily, this course will focus on the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions (which overthrew both French and white planter rule). Taken together, these events reshaped definitions of citizenship, property, and government. But could republican principles-- color-blind in rhetoric-- be so in fact? Could nations be both republican and pro-slavery? Studying a wide range of primary materials, this course will explore the problem of revolution in an age of empires, globalization, and slavery.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olivarius, K. (PI)

AFRICAAM 216: Jazz and Literature (COMPLIT 216)

This course explores the special connection between jazz and literature. In texts that range from American novels to the poetry of African independence movements, jazz emerges at once as a structuring principle (as in Toni Morrison's Jazz and James Baldwin's The Amen Corner) and a unifying theme (for example, Noémia de Sousa's "A Billie Holiday, Cantora"). It is also part of a larger philosophical discussion on rhythm that connects to deep questions of selfhood, ethics, democracy, listening, and vital force. If you love jazz and want to dig deeper into its possibilities or want to find new ways to express literature's power, this class provides the venue. The rest is, as Sonny Rollins put it, "creation and surprise."
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barletta, V. (PI)

AFRICAAM 252C: The Old South: Culture, Society, and Slavery (HISTORY 252C)

This course explores the political, social, and cultural history of the antebellum American South, with an emphasis on the history of African-American slavery. Topics include race and race making, slave community and resistance, gender and reproduction, class and immigration, commodity capitalism, technology, disease and climate, indigenous Southerners, white southern honor culture, the Civil War, and the region's place in national mythmaking and memory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olivarius, K. (PI)

AFRICAAM 256E: The American Civil War (AMSTUD 256E, HISTORY 256E)

What was it like to live in the United States during the Civil War? This course uses the lenses of racial/ethnic identity, gender, class, and geography (among others) to explore the breadth of human experience during this singular moment in American history. It illuminates the varied ways in which Americans, in the Union states and the Confederate states, struggled to move forward and to find meaning in the face of unprecedented division and destruction.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hammann, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 273C: Caribbean Migration to the United States (CSRE 273, HISTORY 273C, HISTORY 373C)

The course will explore the history of Caribbean migration to the United States.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Minian Andjel, A. (PI)
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