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ENGR 14: Intro to Solid Mechanics

Introduction to engineering analysis using the principles of engineering solid mechanics. Builds on the math and physical reasoning concepts in Physics 41 to develop skills in evaluation of engineered systems across a variety of fields. Foundational ideas for more advanced solid mechanics courses such as ME80 or CEE101A. Interactive lecture sessions focused on mathematical application of key concepts, with weekly complementary lab session on testing and designing systems that embody these concepts. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval. Pre-requisite: Physics 41.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 40M: An Intro to Making: What is EE

Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 50E: Introduction to Materials Science, Energy Emphasis

Materials structure, bonding and atomic arrangements leading to their properties and applications. Topics include electronic, thermal and mechanical behavior; emphasizing energy related materials and challenges.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Melosh, N. (PI)

ENGR 60: Engineering Economics and Sustainability (CEE 146S)

Engineering Economics is a subset of the field of economics that draws upon the logic of economics, but adds that analytical power of mathematics and statistics. The concepts developed in this course are broadly applicable to many professional and personal decisions, including making purchasing decisions, deciding between project alternatives, evaluating different processes, and balancing environmental and social costs against economic costs. The concepts taught in this course will be increasingly valuable as students climb the carrier ladder in private industry, a non-governmental organization, a public agency, or in founding their own startup. Eventually, the ability to make informed decisions that are based in fundamental analysis of alternatives is a part of every career. As such, this course is recommended for engineering and non-engineering students alike. This course is taught exclusively online in every quarter it is offered. (Prerequisites: MATH 19 or 20 or approved equivalent.)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lepech, M. (PI)

ENGR 62X: Introduction to Optimization (Accelerated) (MS&E 111X, MS&E 211X)

Optimization theory and modeling. The role of prices, duality, optimality conditions, and algorithms in finding and recognizing solutions. Perspectives: problem formulation, analytical theory, computational methods, and recent applications in engineering, finance, and economics. Theories: finite dimensional derivatives, convexity, optimality, duality, and sensitivity. Methods: simplex and interior-point, gradient, Newton, and barrier. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 70A: Programming Methodology (CS 106A)

Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of respective languages. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.nnAlternative versions of CS106A are available which cover most of the same material but in different programming languages:nnJava (Fall, Win, Spr, or Sum qtr enroll in CS106A section 1) nJavascript (Fall qtr enroll in CS 106A Section 2)nPython (Winter or Spring qtr enroll in CS 106A Section 3)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 70B: Programming Abstractions (CS 106B)

Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 70X: Programming Abstractions (Accelerated) (CS 106X)

Intensive version of 106B for students with a strong programming background interested in a rigorous treatment of the topics at an accelerated pace. Additional advanced material and more challenging projects. Winter quarter assignments will be based in CS department research. Prerequisite: excellence in 106A or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Winter quarter enrollment limited to 30.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cain, J. (PI); Stepp, M. (PI)

ENGR 100: Teaching Public Speaking

The theory and practice of teaching public speaking and presentation development. Lectures/discussions on developing an instructional plan, using audiovisual equipment for instruction, devising tutoring techniques, and teaching delivery, organization, audience analysis, visual aids, and unique speaking situations. Weekly practice speaking. Students serve as apprentice speech tutors. Those completing course may become paid speech instructors in the Technical Communications Program. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 103: Public Speaking (ENGR 203)

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 120: Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering (ENERGY 120)

Lectures, problems, field trip. Engineering topics in petroleum recovery; origin, discovery, and development of oil and gas. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of oil and natural gas. Material balance equations and reserve estimates using volumetric calculations. Gas laws. Single phase and multiphase flow through porous media.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 131: Ethical Issues in Engineering

Fundamental ethical responsibilities of engineers. Ethical responsibilities to society, employers, colleagues, and clients; ethics, cost-benefit-risk analysis, and safety; informed consent; ethical responsibilities of radical engineering design; the ethics of whistleblowing; ethical issues engineers face as expert witnesses, consultants, and managers; ethical issues in engineering research, design, testing, and manufacturing; ethical issues arising from engineering work in foreign countries; and ethical issues arising from the social, cultural, and environmental contexts of contemporary engineering work. Contemporary case studies. Enrollment strictly limited to 60. Students seeking a slot must attend and complete an application at the first class session.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 140B: Leadership of Technology Ventures

Open to Mayfield Fellows only; taken during the summer internship at a technology startup. Students exchange experiences and continue the formal learning process. Activities journal. Credit given following quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Byers, T. (PI)

ENGR 140C: Leadership of Technology Ventures

Open to Mayfield Fellows only. Capstone to the 140 sequence. Students, faculty, employers, and venture capitalists share recent internship experiences and analytical frameworks. Students develop living case studies and integrative project reports.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 145: Technology Entrepreneurship

How do you create a successful start-up? What is entrepreneurial leadership in a large firm? What are the differences between an idea and true opportunity? How does an entrepreneur form a team and gather the resources necessary to create a great enterprise? Mentor-guided project focused on developing students' startup ideas, immersion in nuances of innovation and early stage entrepreneurship, case studies, research on the entrepreneurial process, and the opportunity to network with Silicon Valley's top entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. For undergraduates of all majors who seek to understand the formation and growth of high-impact start-ups in areas such as information, energy, medical and consumer technologies. No prerequisites. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 154: Vector Calculus for Engineers (CME 100)

Computation and visualization using MATLAB. Differential vector calculus: analytic geometry in space, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, unconstrained maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers. Introduction to linear algebra: matrix operations, systems of algebraic equations, methods of solution and applications. Integral vector calculus: multiple integrals in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, line integrals, scalar potential, surface integrals, Green¿s, divergence, and Stokes¿ theorems. Examples and applications drawn from various engineering fields. Prerequisites: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 5, or Calc AB with 5 or placing out of the single variable math placement test: https://exploredegrees-nextyear.stanford.edu/undergraduatedegreesandprograms/#aptextt), or Math 19-21.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 155A: Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (CME 102)

Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 5, or Calc AB with 5 or placing out of the single variable math placement test: https://exploredegreesnextyear.stanford.edu/undergraduatedegreesandprograms/#aptextt),), or Math 19-21. Recommended: CME100.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 199: Special Studies in Engineering

Special studies, lab work, or reading under the direction of a faculty member. Often research experience opportunities exist in ongoing research projects. Students make arrangements with individual faculty and enroll in the section number corresponding to the particular faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 199W: Writing of Original Research for Engineers

Technical writing in science and engineering. Students produce a substantial document describing their research, methods, and results. Prerequisite: completion of freshman writing requirements; prior or concurrent in 2 units of research in the major department; and consent of instructor. WIM for BioMedical Computation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 202S: Directed Writing Projects

Individualized writing instruction for students working on writing projects such as dissertations, proposals, grant applications, honors or engineering theses, journal articles, conference papers, and teaching and research statements. Weekly one-on-one conferences with writing instructors from the Technical Communication Program. Students receive close attention to and detailed feedback on their writing. No prerequisite. Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit. This course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; McDevitt, M. (PI)

ENGR 202W: Technical Writing

How to write clear, concise, and well-ordered technical prose. Principles of editing for structure and style. Applications to a variety of genres in engineering and science.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 203: Public Speaking (ENGR 103)

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 205: Introduction to Control Design Techniques

Review of root-locus and frequency response techniques for control system analysis and synthesis. State-space techniques for modeling, full-state feedback regulator design, pole placement, and observer design. Combined observer and regulator design. Lab experiments on computers connected to mechanical systems. Prerequisites: 105, MATH 103, 113. Recommended: Matlab.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rock, S. (PI)

ENGR 231: Transformative Design

Too many alums are doing what they've always been told they're good at, and are living with regret and a sense that they're just resigned to doing this thing for the rest of their lives. Capabilities displaced their values as the primary decision driver in their lives. Our ultimate goal is to restore a sense of agency and passion into the lives of current Stanford students by creating the space to explore and experiment with the greatest design project possible: YOUR LIFE. We will turn d.school tools and mindsets onto the topic of our lives -- not in theory, but in reality -- and will prototype changes to make your life and career more fulfilling and rewarding. We will actively empathize and experiment in your life and work, so if you don't want to do that kind of self-examination, this class will not be a good fit for you.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 241: Advanced Micro and Nano Fabrication Laboratory

This project course focuses on developing processes for ExFab, a shared facility that supports flexible lithography, heterogeneous integration, and rapid micro prototyping. Team projects are approved by the instructor and are mentored by an ExFab staff member. Students will plan and execute experiments and document them in a final presentation and report, to be made available on the lab¿s Wiki for the benefit of the Stanford research community.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 290: Graduate Environment of Support

For course assistants (CAs) and tutors in the School of Engineering tutorial and learning program. Interactive training for effective academic assistance. Pedagogy, developing course material, tutoring, and advising. Sources include video, readings, projects, and role playing.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lozano, N. (PI)

ENGR 298: Seminar in Fluid Mechanics

Interdepartmental. Problems in all branches of fluid mechanics, with talks by visitors, faculty, and students. Graduate students may register for 1 unit, without letter grade; a letter grade is given for talks. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGR 299: Special Studies in Engineering

Special studies, lab work, or reading under the direction of a faculty member. Often research experience opportunities exist in ongoing research projects. Students make arrangements with individual faculty and enroll in the corresponding section. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 312: Science and Engineering Course Design (VPTL 312)

For students interested in an academic career and who anticipate designing science or engineering courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Goal is to apply research on science and engineering learning to the design of effective course materials. Topics include syllabus design, course content and format decisions, assessment planning and grading, and strategies for teaching improvement.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGR 350: Data Impact Lab

In this lab, multi-disciplinary teams of students tackle high-impact, unsolved problems for social sector partners. Teams receive mentorship and coaching from Stanford faculty, domain experts, and data science experts from industry. Sample projects include innovations for: poverty alleviation in the developing world, local government services, education, and healthcare. Limited enrollment; application required. May be repeated for credit. See http://datalab.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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