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CLASSICS 2G: Beginning Greek

(Formerly CLASSGRK 2.) Continuation of CLASSICS 1G. Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McCall, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 2L: Beginning Latin

(Formerly CLASSLAT 2.) Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language. Prerequisite: CLASSICS 1L or equivalent placement.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Klopacz, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 6G: Biblical Greek (JEWISHST 5, RELIGST 171A)

(Formerly CLASSGRK 5.) This is a one term intensive class in Biblical Greek. After quickly learning the basics of the language, we will then dive right into readings from the New Testament and the Septuagint, which is the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. No previous knowledge of Greek required. If demand is high for a second term, an additional quarter will be offered in the Spring.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gardner, N. (PI)

CLASSICS 6L: Latin 400-1700 CE (CLASSICS 208L, RELIGST 173X)

Readings in later Latin, drawing on the vast bodies of texts from the late antique, medieval and early modern periods. Each week students will prepare selections in advance of class meetings; class time will be devoted to translation and discussion. Students taking this course will gain exposure to a wide range of later Latin texts; hone translation skills; and develop an awareness of the grammatical and stylistic features of post-classical Latin. The course is aimed both at classical Latinists seeking to broaden their reading experience and at medievalists and early modernists seeking to consolidate their Latin language skills.nnSample readings:nK.P. Harrington et al, Medieval Latin 2nd edn.nM. Riley, The Neo-Latin Reader: selections from Petrarch to RimbaudnnPrior experience in Latin is required, preferably CLASSICS 11L. Equivalent accepted. Anyone unsure whether to take this course is encouraged to contact the instructor in advance.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 12G: Intermediate Greek: Sophocles' Antigone

(Formerly CLASSGRK 102.) Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zuckerman, V. (PI)

CLASSICS 12L: Intermediate Latin: Cicero and Catullus

(Formerly CLASSLAT 102.) In this class you will practice with and reinforce the advanced vocabulary, forms, and syntax of classical Latin you have previously acquired. The primary emphasis of this course is on developing fluency in reading Latin. You will have opportunities to discuss topics and issues raised by the readings.Your knowledge of the content and syntax of the readings will be assessed by several short translation/grammar quizzes.Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Recht, T. (PI)

CLASSICS 16N: Sappho: Erotic Poetess of Lesbos (FEMGEN 24N)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 24N.) Preference to freshmen. Sappho's surviving fragments in English; traditions referring to or fantasizing about her disputed life. How her poetry and legend inspired women authors and male poets such as Swinburne, Baudelaire, and Pound. Paintings inspired by Sappho in ancient and modern times, and composers who put her poetry to music.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Peponi, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 17N: To Die For: Antigone and Political Dissent (TAPS 12N)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 6N.) Preference to freshmen. Tensions inherent in the democracy of ancient Athens; how the character of Antigone emerges in later drama, film, and political thought as a figure of resistance against illegitimate authority; and her relevance to contemporary struggles for women's and workers' rights and national liberation. Readings and screenings include versions of Antigone by Sophocles, Anouilh, Brecht, Fugard/Kani/Ntshona, Paulin, Glowacki, Gurney, and von Trotta.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rehm, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 19N: Eloquence Personified: How To Speak Like Cicero

This course is an introduction to Roman rhetoric, Cicero's Rome, and the active practice of speaking well. Participants read a short rhetorical treatise by Cicero, analyze one of his speeches as well as more recent ones by, e.g., Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr., and Obama, and watch their oratorical performances. During the remainder of the term they practice rhetoric, prepare and deliver in class two (short) speeches, and write an essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Krebs, C. (PI)

CLASSICS 34: Ancient Athletics

(Formerly CLASSGEN 34.) How the Olympic Games developed and how they were organized. Many other Greek festivals featured sport and dance competitions, including some for women, and showcased the citizen athlete as a civic ideal. Roman athletics in contrast saw the growth of large-scale spectator sports and professional athletes. Some toured like media stars; others regularly risked death in gladiatorial contests and chariot-racing. We will also explore how large-scale games were funded and how they fostered the development of sports medicine. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required; enroll in sections on coursework.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 38: Humanities: An Introduction to How Humans Think About Themselves (HUMCORE 1)

Ever since humans evolved, we have been asking ourselves what we are and how we should live. This course is an introduction to the answers that have been offered, asking why they have varied so much and how they might continue to change in the future. Combining literary, archaeological, and anthropological evidence from around the world with the insights of biology, psychology, and the social sciences, the class will trace the story from the origins of modern humans some 200,000-300,000 years ago forward to our own age. Central topics will include what makes humans different from other animals, whether there is a universal human nature, and how the humanities differ from the sciences. The course is intended as an introduction to the global history of humanistic thought and as a foundation for more detailed study in the humanities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 52: Introduction to Roman Archaeology (ARCHLGY 81)

(Formerly CLASSART 81.) This course will introduce you to the material culture of the ancient Roman world, from spectacular imperial monuments in the city of Rome to cities and roads around the Mediterranean, from overarching environmental concerns to individual human burials, from elite houses and army forts to the the lives of slaves, freedmen and gladiators. Key themes will be change and continuity over time; the material, spatial and visual workings of power; how Roman society was materially changed by its conquests and how conquered peoples responded materially to Roman rule.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 83: The Greeks (HISTORY 101)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 101.) 250 years ago, for almost the first time in history, a few societies rejected kings who claimed to know what the gods wanted and began moving toward democracy. Only once before had this happened--in ancient Greece. This course asks how the Greeks did this, and what they can teach us today. It uses texts and archaeology to trace the material and military sides of the story as well as cultural developments, and looks at Greek slavery and misogyny as well as their achievements. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 102G: Advanced Greek: Greek Scientific Writings

(Formerly CLASSGRK 112.) Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Netz, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 102L: Advanced Latin: Rebel with a cause: Catiline

(Formerly CLASSLAT 112.) Beguiling. Riotous. Fallen. Lucius Sergius Catilina (108-62 BCE): Who was he? Reading of selections of Cicero's Catilinarians and In Defense of Caelius, and Sallust's Catilinarian Conspiracy. We will compare the three different Catilinarian villains within the framework of rhetoric, Cicero's and Sallust's styles (esp. metaphors), and explore the historian's possible debts to the orator. As needed, we will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Krebs, C. (PI)

CLASSICS 105A: Greek Syntax: Prose Composition (CLASSICS 205A)

(Formerly CLASSGRK 175A/275A.) Review of Greek grammar and instruction in Greek prose composition skills. Begins sixth week of Winter Quarter and continues through Spring Quarter. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Greek. First-year graduate students register for 205A/B.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Stephens, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 112: Introduction to Greek Tragedy: Gods, Heroes, Fate, and Justice (TAPS 167)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 110.) Gods and heroes, fate and free choice, gender conflict, the justice or injustice of the universe: these are just some of the fundamental human issues that we will explore in about ten of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 150: Majors Seminar

(Formerly CLASSGEN 176.) Required of Classics majors and minors in junior or senior year; students contemplating honors should take this course in junior year. Advanced skills course involving close reading, critical thinking, editing, and writing. In-class and take-home writing and revising exercises. Final paper topic may be on any subject related to Classics. Fulfills WIM requirement for Classics.nnWinter Quarter topic: investigating a wide range of ethical dilemmas raised by the ownership of the classical past in the 21st centurynSpring Quarter topic: Why study Classics? The uses and abuses of classical studies.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 162: Introduction to Greek Art II: The Classical Period (ARTHIST 102)

The class begins with the art, architecture and political ideals of Periclean Athens, from the emergence of the city as the political and cultural center of Greece in 450 to its defeat in the Peloponnesian War in 404. It then considers how Athens and the rest of Greece proceed in the fourth century to rebuild their lives and the monuments that define them. Earlier artistic traditions endure, with subtle changes, in the work of sculptors such as Kephisodotos. Less subtle are the outlook and output of his son Praxiteles. In collaboration with Phryne, his muse and mistress, Praxiteles challenged the canons and constraints of the past with the first female nude in the history of Greek sculpture. His gender-bending depictions of gods and men were equally audacious, their shiny surfaces reflecting Plato¿s discussion of Eros and androgyny. Scopas was also a man of his time but pursued different interests. Drawn to the inner lives of men and woman, his tormented Trojan War heroes and victims are still scarred by memories of the Peloponnesian War, and a world away from the serene faces of the Parthenon. His famous Maenad, a devotee of Dionysos who has left this world for another, belongs to the same years as Euripides' Bacchae and, at the same time, anticipates the torsion and turbulence of Bernini and the Italian Baroque. In the work of these and other fourth century personalities, the stage is set for Alexander the Great and his conquest of a kingdom extending from Greece to the Indus River. (Formerly CLASSART 102)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Maxmin, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 176: History of Muslim Science: from Alexandria to Baghdad

How the Muslim world in the Middle Ages preserved and transformed ancient science - and thus made modern science possible. The class follows the ideas and contributions of several key authors such as Al-Khwarizmi (author of the Algorithm), Omar Khayyam and Ibn-Sina, always looking for a key question: what was distinctive about Muslim science, in its own civilization?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Netz, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 181: Classical Seminar: Origins of Political Thought (CLASSICS 381, PHIL 176A, PHIL 276A, POLISCI 230A, POLISCI 330A)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 133/333.) Political philosophy in classical antiquity, focusing on canonical works of Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero. Historical background. Topics include: political obligation, citizenship, and leadership; origins and development of democracy; and law, civic strife, and constitutional change.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ober, J. (PI); Shi, P. (GP)

CLASSICS 198: Directed Readings (Undergraduate)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 160.) May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 199: Undergraduate Thesis: Senior Research

(Formerly CLASSGEN 199.) May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 202G: Survey of Greek Literature: Classical Greek

(Formerly CLASSGEN 208B.) Required two-year sequence focusing on the origins, development, and interaction of Greek and Latin literature, history, and philosophy. Greek and Latin material taught in alternate years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Peponi, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 205A: Greek Syntax: Prose Composition (CLASSICS 105A)

(Formerly CLASSGRK 175A/275A.) Review of Greek grammar and instruction in Greek prose composition skills. Begins sixth week of Winter Quarter and continues through Spring Quarter. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Greek. First-year graduate students register for 205A/B.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Stephens, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 208L: Latin 400-1700 CE (CLASSICS 6L, RELIGST 173X)

Readings in later Latin, drawing on the vast bodies of texts from the late antique, medieval and early modern periods. Each week students will prepare selections in advance of class meetings; class time will be devoted to translation and discussion. Students taking this course will gain exposure to a wide range of later Latin texts; hone translation skills; and develop an awareness of the grammatical and stylistic features of post-classical Latin. The course is aimed both at classical Latinists seeking to broaden their reading experience and at medievalists and early modernists seeking to consolidate their Latin language skills.nnSample readings:nK.P. Harrington et al, Medieval Latin 2nd edn.nM. Riley, The Neo-Latin Reader: selections from Petrarch to RimbaudnnPrior experience in Latin is required, preferably CLASSICS 11L. Equivalent accepted. Anyone unsure whether to take this course is encouraged to contact the instructor in advance.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 217: Western Receptions of Classical Latin Literature: Epic, Lyric, Elegy, Pastoral, Novel

This lecture class aims to explore the later reception of some major texts of Latin poetry and fiction in later European literatures and intellectual cultures from the medieval period until now, predominantly English but occasionally some other European modern languages [English translations supplied]. There will be some orientation in reception studies and its theory. Reading expectations will be mainly literary texts, no more than 100 pages in English per week; the course will look at translations and history of scholarship as well as literary adaptations. Particular attention will be paid to issues of cultural tension and later transformation of classical material in different historical and intellectual environments. It should be of interest to students of English and comparative literature as well as classicists.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Harrison, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 298: Directed Reading in Classics (Graduate Students)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 260.)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 304: Developing a Classics Dissertation Prospectus

This workshop concentrates on the development process of writing a successful dissertation proposal and clarifies expectations of the defense process. Includes peer reviews of draft proposals with an aim to present provisional proposals by the end of term. Highly recommended for current third-year Classics Ph.D. students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stephens, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 329: Roman Spaces

How might we make sense of the physical environment in the Roman world? What are the most useful units by which to make sense of its parts? What is the character and impact of human interventions? We'll take a detailed but wide-ranging look at Mediterranean landscapes, emphasizing the period of Roman hegemony. Proceeding systematically, we will get the measure of each province triangulating ancient texts (Strabo, Pliny the elder, Pausanias) and documents; the archaeological record; and the landscape itself.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Parker, G. (PI)

CLASSICS 339: Catullus: Textual Criticism and Literary Interpretation

This seminar will read much of the work of the major Latin poet Catullus (including some of the longer poems) from the perspective of textual criticism and literary interpretation: the two are necessarily closely bound up, and the minimal and imperfect nature of the Catullan textual transmission gives excellent opportunities to concentrate on trying to work out what the poet wrote and why, as well as analysing his work from a literary perspective. It will give orientation in the principles and practice of textual criticism as well as on Catullus and late republican Latin poetry. Metre will also figure. We will read up to 12 pages of Latin per week with some secondary literature. A good knowledge of Latin is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Harrison, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 346: Aristotle's Protrepticus and its Background (PHIL 315)

In this seminar, we shall read Aristotle's Protrepticus. This is an early work of Aristotle that attempts to turn the reader to a philosophic life and it is by far the least read of his works on ethics. It was only recovered in the 19th century and only in the past 15 years or so do we have a reliable text. Thus studies of it are very much underdeveloped. We shall also read as background some other protreptic works by Plato and the rhetorician Isocrates. 2 unit option is only for Philosophy PhD students beyond the second year.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bobonich, C. (PI)

CLASSICS 370: Topics in Roman Art and Visual Culture

Ancient Roman visual culture both reflected and actively shaped political, social, cultural and economic situations. Artworks, imagery and things seen played roles in constructing experience, intervening in human relationships, representing meaning, and framing possibility in particular ways. This seminar explores some of the most exciting recent work on Roman art and visual culture. Topics may include viewing and reception, materiality and object relations, framing, and others.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Trimble, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 381: Classical Seminar: Origins of Political Thought (CLASSICS 181, PHIL 176A, PHIL 276A, POLISCI 230A, POLISCI 330A)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 133/333.) Political philosophy in classical antiquity, focusing on canonical works of Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero. Historical background. Topics include: political obligation, citizenship, and leadership; origins and development of democracy; and law, civic strife, and constitutional change.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ober, J. (PI); Shi, P. (GP)

CLASSICS 390: Origins of Political Thought (PHIL 276D, POLISCI 430)

Political philosophy in classical antiquity, focusing on canonical works of Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero. Historical background. Topics include: political obligation, citizenship, and leadership; origins and development of democracy; and law, civic strife, and constitutional change
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ober, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 399: Dissertation Research in Classics

(Formerly CLASSGEN 360.)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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