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AFRICAAM 21: African American Vernacular English (CSRE 21, LINGUIST 65, LINGUIST 265)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rickford, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 106: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 130: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (CSRE 130, EDUC 123, EDUC 322)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (CSRE 245, EDUC 245)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

AFRICAST 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

AFRICAST 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

CHILATST 1SI: English Language Learner Tutoring and Curriculum Development

The principal purpose of this course is to support Habla tutors in developing lesson plans and strategies to implement during their tutoring sessions with English language learners. The course equips students with a foundational understanding of English as a second language, practical experience with developing educational materials for language learning, and a collaborative space to reflect on the tutoring experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

CSRE 21: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, LINGUIST 65, LINGUIST 265)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rickford, J. (PI)

CSRE 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 130: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (AFRICAAM 130, EDUC 123, EDUC 322)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

EDUC 102: Examining Social Structures, Power, and Educational Access

Goal is to prepare Education and Youth Development fellows for their work with adolescents in the Haas Center's pre-college summer programs and to define their role in addressing educational inequities in the summer programs and beyond.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Garcia, P. (PI); Kim, S. (PI)

EDUC 103A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 203A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scott, R. (PI)

EDUC 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 104: Introduction to the Profession of Teaching

This course explores the profession of teaching through an internship in a local elementary or high school classroom. Students will observe and assist instruction for four hours per week. In class, students will read, discuss, and respond to theory and research related to teaching. The course is open to all undergraduates with an interest in the teaching profession; and it may be especially useful for students who are considering entering the profession of teaching and wish to spend time in a classroom. No prior experience in teaching is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Murdock-Perriera, L. (PI)

EDUC 112: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 212, SOC 129X, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 117: Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access (EDUC 417)

The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 122Q: Democracy in Crisis: Learning from the Past (HISTORY 52Q, POLISCI 20Q)

This Sophomore Seminar will focus on U.S. democracy and will use a series of case studies of major events in our national history to explore what happened and why to American democracy at key pressure points. This historical exploration should shed light on how the current challenges facing American democracy might best be handled. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ehrlich, T. (PI)

EDUC 123: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (AFRICAAM 130, CSRE 130, EDUC 322)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

EDUC 124: Collaborative Design and Research of Technology-integrated Curriculum

The course introduces participatory design models for the development and research of educational materials through a studio-based, partnership driven, technology-integrated curriculum project. The special topic taken up in 2018 will be concussion education for youth. This is a studio experience working collaboratively with students, parents, and athletic coaches to design, field test, and make recommendations about learning activities and technology use for a complex curriculum that will engage immersive 360 3D technologies and social media. We will partner with TeachAids, an international nonprofit, on the curriculum development. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

EDUC 139: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 239, ME 139, ME 231)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goldman, S. (PI)

EDUC 148: Critical Perspectives on Teaching and Tutoring English Language Learners

Theoretical foundation for volunteer tutors of English language learners in urban environments working with children in school-based programs or adults in community-based settings.May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 171: Preschool Counts: Engaging Young Children in Math

Restricted to students who participate in a service learning program focused on early math learning. Training for activities in preschool classrooms. Focus is on the teaching of math to young children, but also includes background on issues related to young children's cognitive, language, and social development; classroom management; cultural diversity; and early childhood education programs. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 180S: Pre-field Course for Alternative Spring Break

Limited to students participating in the Alternative Spring Break program. See http://asb.stanford.edu for more inform
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 203A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 103A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scott, R. (PI)

EDUC 208B: Curriculum Construction

The theories and methods of curriculum development and improvement. Topics: curriculum ideologies, perspectives on design, strategies for diverse learners, and the politics of curriculum construction and implementation. Students develop curriculum plans for use in real settings. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pope, D. (PI)

EDUC 220D: History of School Reform: Origins, Policies, Outcomes, and Explanations (HISTORY 258E)

Strongly recommended for students in the POLS M.A. program; others welcome. Focus is on 20th-century U.S. Intended and unintended patterns in school change; the paradox of reform that schools are often reforming but never seem to change much; rhetorics of reform and factors that inhibit change. Case studies emphasize the American high school. This course is strongly recommended for POLS students pursuing K -12 leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 239: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 139, ME 139, ME 231)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goldman, S. (PI)

EDUC 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, CSRE 245)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

EDUC 281: Technology for Learners

How can we use technology to improve learning? Many hope that technology will make learning easier, faster, or accessible to more learners. This course explores a variety of approaches to designing tools for learning, the theories behind them, and the research that tests their effectiveness. Strong focus on evaluating and designing new tools for specific learners and subjects. Space is limited. Priority is given to master's students in the LDT Master's Program. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 322: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (AFRICAAM 130, CSRE 130, EDUC 123)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ball, A. (PI)

EDUC 332: Theory and Practice of Environmental Education (EARTHSYS 332)

Foundational understanding of the history, theoretical underpinnings, and practice of environmental education as a tool for addressing today's pressing environmental issues. The purpose, design, and implementation of environmental education in formal and nonformal settings with youth and adult audiences. Field trip and community-based project offer opportunities for experiencing and engaging with environmental education initiatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 335: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

EDUC 337: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 377C: Philanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change

Appropriate for any student driven to effect positive social change from either the for-profit or nonprofit sector, Philanthropy will challenge students to expand their own strategic thinking about philanthropic aspiration and action. In recent decades, philanthropy has become an industry in itself - amounting to over $358 billion in the year 2014. Additionally, the last decade has seen unprecedented innovation in both philanthropy and social value creation. This course explores the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations and corporate foundations; and innovative models, including funding intermediaries, open-source platforms, technology-driven philanthropies, impact investing and venture philanthropy. Course work will include readings and case discussions that encourage students to analyze both domestic and global philanthropic strategies as they relate to foundation mission, grantmaking, evaluation, financial management, infrastructure, knowledge management, policy change and board governance. Guest speakers will consist of high profile philanthropists, foundation presidents, social entrepreneurs and Silicon Valley business leaders creating new philanthropic models. The course will also provide students with real-world grantmaking experience in completing nonprofit organizational assessments and making grants to organizations totaling $20,000.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 450C: Qualitative Interviewing

Addressing the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative interviews as well as the application of theory to practice, this course considers different approaches to interviewing. Interview types covered will range from group interviews to individual interviews, and from unstructured, ethnographically oriented interviews to highly structured interviews. Working with community partners to facilitate application to practice, the students will move from theory to interview design, implementation, and initial stages of analysis, with an emphasis on consistency in approach and utility in graduate-level research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ardoin, N. (PI)

HISTORY 52Q: Democracy in Crisis: Learning from the Past (EDUC 122Q, POLISCI 20Q)

This Sophomore Seminar will focus on U.S. democracy and will use a series of case studies of major events in our national history to explore what happened and why to American democracy at key pressure points. This historical exploration should shed light on how the current challenges facing American democracy might best be handled. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ehrlich, T. (PI)

HISTORY 258E: History of School Reform: Origins, Policies, Outcomes, and Explanations (EDUC 220D)

Strongly recommended for students in the POLS M.A. program; others welcome. Focus is on 20th-century U.S. Intended and unintended patterns in school change; the paradox of reform that schools are often reforming but never seem to change much; rhetorics of reform and factors that inhibit change. Case studies emphasize the American high school. This course is strongly recommended for POLS students pursuing K -12 leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 272D: Teaching Mexican American History in High School (CHILATST 272A, CSRE 272A)

The purpose of the course is two fold: 1) to expose students to salient historical themes and topics in Mexican American history, and 2) to establish a mentoring project with students currently enrolled in Mexican American history courses at Luis Valdez Leadership Academy (LVLA) high school in San Jose. Students will gain a broad understanding of Mexican American history, especially since the early twentieth century, with a particular focus on the Chicano Movement of the 1960s and 1970s. Students must also commit to enrollment in Hist 272F in spring quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Camarillo, A. (PI)

HRP 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

HUMBIO 26: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

LAW 805R: Policy Practicum: Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures

Client: National Women's Law Center. This practicum continues policy research and advocacy undertaken in Spring 2017 (see description below). Day/Time: TBD scheduled in accordance with registered student availability. Students will refine and finalize policy and procedures , including suggestions from clients and stakeholders, and the priorities that emerged from "The Way Forward" Title IX Conference in Spring 2017 at Stanford Law School. We will seek further feedback from legal, survivor, and other stakeholder groups, and work in conjunction with the National Women's Law Center (NWLC) to disseminate the findings and recommendations to the target end-user groups. This Practicum builds on the skills of thinking about law in an integrated way and situating policy in a direct social context where it can be more readily applied. The project provides students with first-hand experience in gaining a broad and nuanced understanding of emerging social, legal, and policy dilemmas. Given all the controversy surrounding sexual assault on college campuses, surprisingly little is actually known about the policies and processes that are currently in use, nor any way of easily ascertaining what the majority of an institution's "peer schools" are doing with respect to solving a challenge or addressing an issue. There is no set of "best practices" to which school administrators can easily turn. The goal of the practicum is to produce a free, web-based, open-source set of adaptable model policies and procedures that are targeted to different market segments and stakeholders (i.e., large private, large public, small private, HBCU, community colleges, and k12). Enrollment is limited and preference will be given to students enrolled in the Spring 2017 Seminar/Policy Lab Practicum. Students from CS or EE or who have coding and have an interest in the design and building of the online platform would be welcome to join the Policy Lab as well. Over the past four years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students)experience sexual assault. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators, launching one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. Statistics are equally disturbing in the middle and high school context. As a result, the federal government has stepped up its civil rights enforcement in this area, with over 250 colleges and universities currently under investigation for allegedly mishandling student sexual assault complaints. At the same time, students accused of sexual assault have complained of botched processes driven by a "campus rape over-correction" that denied them a fair disciplinary hearing. It is clear that schools are struggling to develop and implement policies and procedures that satisfy their legal obligations in this area. This course focuses on the legal and policy issues surrounding the highly challenging area of investigation and adjudication of sexual assault and other gender-motivated violence on college campuses and in K12 schools. It covers the federal and state legal frameworks governing these procedures including Title IX, the Violence Against Women Act, and the Clery Act, and examines current cases as well as the rapidly evolving legal, federal regulatory, and political environment surrounding this issue. Guest speakers working in the area will help to broaden students' understanding of the subject matter. NOTES: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Dauber, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 65: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, CSRE 21, LINGUIST 265)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rickford, J. (PI)

ME 139: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 139, EDUC 239, ME 231)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goldman, S. (PI)

ME 231: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 139, EDUC 239, ME 139)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goldman, S. (PI)

MED 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

MUSIC 9: Music + Mentorship

Music + Mentorship (M+M) is a coalition of Stanford University musicians who seek to empower kids in the surrounding community through music. Through M+M, volunteers commit to weekly music lessons in local schools and participate in class readings and discussions about the principles of music education. Guest lecturers include local music educators.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI)

POLISCI 20Q: Democracy in Crisis: Learning from the Past (EDUC 122Q, HISTORY 52Q)

This Sophomore Seminar will focus on U.S. democracy and will use a series of case studies of major events in our national history to explore what happened and why to American democracy at key pressure points. This historical exploration should shed light on how the current challenges facing American democracy might best be handled. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ehrlich, T. (PI)

SPANLANG 11SL: Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on Service Learning, First Quarter

Continuation of SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A. Identity and community. Sequence integrating community engaged learning, culture and language with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and academic contexts. SL content focuses on artistic projects with Spanish-speaking youth organizations in the local community. Requires one evening off campus per week in addition to four hours of regular class time. Projects may vary from quarter to quarter (e.g., mural art, print-making, digital storytelling, etc.) but focus on themes surrounding community and youth identity. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Miano, A. (PI)

SPANLANG 12SL: Spanlang 12SL Second-Year: Empahasis on Service Learning, second qtr

Continuation of SPANLANG 11. Identity and community. Sequence integrating community engagd learning, culture and language with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and academic contexts. SL content focuses on artistic projects with Spanish-speaking youth organizations in the local community. May require additional hours off campus immediately before and after class, in addition to regular class time. Projects may vary from quarter to quarter (e.g., mural art, environmental projects, poetry, etc.) but focus on themes surrounding community and youth identity. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 11C, 11R, or 11SL.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Del Carpio, C. (PI)

SPANLANG 13SL: Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on Service Learning, Third Quarter

Continuation of SPANLANG 12. Integration of community engagement and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and professional contexts. SL content focuses on immersion in civics-based reciprocity and service learning in the Spanish-speaking local community. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 12C, 12R, 12M or 12S. Fulfills the IR major Language Requirement.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brates, V. (PI)

URBANST 104: Civic Dreams, Human Spaces: Designing Cities for People

Cities and real estate generate lively public discussions, passionate community meetings, and political shouting matches. But how does a project actually get proposed and built? We explore the key actors and influencers in the urban built environment, ranging from urban planners to real estate developers to community advocates. This intensive d.school experience aims to deepen our insights about stakeholders, so that we gain a more empathetic understanding of how a city is built, and identify potential opportunities for improving the process of urban intervention and regeneration to be more responsive to citizens and responsible to society. Enrollment by application only. Find more info and apply at dschool.stanford.edu. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center). Course meets at the d.school in Studio 2.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chan, D. (PI); Hsu, K. (PI)
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