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CEE 70: Environmental Science and Technology (ENGR 90)

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 73: Water: An Introduction

Lake Tahoe's waters are so clear you can follow a diver 70 feet below your boat. A Lake Erie summer often means that nearshore waters have a green surface scum obscuring everything below. California, suffering from drought, is seriously considering reclamation and direct potable reuse of sewage -- aka toilet to tap. Can we (or should we) do this? Why is Tahoe clear, Erie green? This class introduces students to the fundamental tools and science used to understand and manage both natural and human-engineered water systems. Each student will use these tools to explore a water topic of their choosing.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 101S: Science & Engineering Problem-Solving with MatLab. (CEE 201S)

Introduction to the application of MATLAB as a powerful tool to solve a variety of science and engineering problems. Exposure to computational and visualization tools available through MATLAB to analyze, solve, and visualize some common problems of interest in science and engineering. Prequisite: Calculus. Note: students enrolling in CEE 201S must seek the consent of instructor.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fong, D. (PI)

CEE 107S: Understanding Energy - Essentials (CEE 207S)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. Students will learn the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts ¿ and will be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 3 units, which includes lecture, readings and videos, assignments, and one off-site field trips. Field trip offerings differ each quarter (see syllabus for updated list), but for the spring quarter may include Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, Shasta dam, Tesla Gigafactory, NextEra wind farm, San Ardo oil field, Geyser¿s geothermal power plants, etc. Students choose one field trip from approximately 8 that are offered. For the summer quarter, one off-campus field trip will be offered and required. Enroll for 4 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). This is a course for all: pre-majors and majors, with any background ¿ no prior energy knowledge necessary. For a course that covers all of this plus goes more in-depth into the technical aspects of each energy resource, check out CEE 107A/207A/EarthSys 103 Understanding Energy offered in the autumn quarter (cannot take both for credit). This course was formerly called Energy Resources. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107A/207A/EarthSys 103
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ginnebaugh, D. (PI)

CEE 120A: Building Information Modeling Workshop (CEE 220A)

The foundational Building Information Modeling course introduces techniques for creating, managing, and applying of building information models in the building design and construction process. The course covers processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components and geometries to produce models used in architectural design, construction planning and documentation, rendering and visualization, simulation and analysis.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 146S: Engineering Economics and Sustainability (ENGR 60)

Engineering Economics is a subset of the field of economics that draws upon the logic of economics, but adds that analytical power of mathematics and statistics. The concepts developed in this course are broadly applicable to many professional and personal decisions, including making purchasing decisions, deciding between project alternatives, evaluating different processes, and balancing environmental and social costs against economic costs. The concepts taught in this course will be increasingly valuable as students climb the carrier ladder in private industry, a non-governmental organization, a public agency, or in founding their own startup. Eventually, the ability to make informed decisions that are based in fundamental analysis of alternatives is a part of every career. As such, this course is recommended for engineering and non-engineering students alike. This course is taught exclusively online in every quarter it is offered. (Prerequisites: MATH 19 or 20 or approved equivalent.)
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 170S: Environmental Disasters (CEE 270S)

Mining and critical review of scientific literature for environmental impacts, especially chemical contamination caused by natural and anthropogenic disasters. Focus is on the development of research review skills, critical thinking and discussion of findings.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cho, Y. (PI); Ong, C. (SI)

CEE 171F: New Indicators of Well-Being and Sustainability (CEE 271F)

Explore new ways to better measure human development, comprehensive wealth and sustainability beyond standard economic indicators such as income and GDP. Examine how new indicators shape global, national and local policy worldwide. Well-being topics include health, happiness, trust, inequality and governance. Sustainability topics include sustainable development, environmental performance indicators, material flow analysis and decoupling, and inclusive wealth indicators. Students will build their own indicator of well-being and sustainability for a term paper.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laurent, E. (PI)

CEE 175P: Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs (CEE 275P)

Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stanton, C. (PI)

CEE 175S: Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEE 275S)

Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 176G: Sustainability Design Thinking (CEE 276G)

Application design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 177L: Smart Cities & Communities (CEE 277L)

A city is comprised of people and a complex system of systems. Data provides the connective tissue between those systems. Smart cities use information technology (IT) to harness that data for operational efficiency, efficacy of government services, and sustainability. Key enablers covered include: IoT, open data, analytics, cloud and cognitive computing, and systems of engagement. System case studies will include: water, energy, transportation, buildings, food production, urban design, and social services. The evolving relationship between a city and its citizens as well as the risks / challenges of smart cities will also be explored.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lechner, R. (PI)

CEE 179S: Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 279S, EARTHSYS 179S, ESS 179S)

Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 199H: Undergraduate Honors Thesis

For students who have declared the Civil Engineering B.S. honors major and have obtained approval of a topic for research under the guidance of a CEE faculty adviser. Letter grade only. Written thesis or oral presentation required.n (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 199S: Undergraduate Summer Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering

Investigation of a research topic in civil and environmental engineering. For students admitted to the Stanford Summer Session program. Written report or oral presentation required. Students must obtain a faculty or research staff sponsor.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-6 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 207S: Understanding Energy - Essentials (CEE 107S)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. Students will learn the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts ¿ and will be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 3 units, which includes lecture, readings and videos, assignments, and one off-site field trips. Field trip offerings differ each quarter (see syllabus for updated list), but for the spring quarter may include Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, Shasta dam, Tesla Gigafactory, NextEra wind farm, San Ardo oil field, Geyser¿s geothermal power plants, etc. Students choose one field trip from approximately 8 that are offered. For the summer quarter, one off-campus field trip will be offered and required. Enroll for 4 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). This is a course for all: pre-majors and majors, with any background ¿ no prior energy knowledge necessary. For a course that covers all of this plus goes more in-depth into the technical aspects of each energy resource, check out CEE 107A/207A/EarthSys 103 Understanding Energy offered in the autumn quarter (cannot take both for credit). This course was formerly called Energy Resources. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107A/207A/EarthSys 103
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ginnebaugh, D. (PI)

CEE 220A: Building Information Modeling Workshop (CEE 120A)

The foundational Building Information Modeling course introduces techniques for creating, managing, and applying of building information models in the building design and construction process. The course covers processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components and geometries to produce models used in architectural design, construction planning and documentation, rendering and visualization, simulation and analysis.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 265C: Water Resources Management (CEE 165C)

Optimal equilibrium between water supply and water demand, under specific local and regional physical, environmental, social and economic constraints. Principles in the context of sustainable development, increasing water scarcity in many parts of the world, and hydrologic uncertainty including that associated with climate change. Operations and water quality in reservoirs, river basins, and groundwater systems; non-conventional water sources; demand management options; and the institutional and legal framework.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Findikakis, A. (PI)

CEE 271F: New Indicators of Well-Being and Sustainability (CEE 171F)

Explore new ways to better measure human development, comprehensive wealth and sustainability beyond standard economic indicators such as income and GDP. Examine how new indicators shape global, national and local policy worldwide. Well-being topics include health, happiness, trust, inequality and governance. Sustainability topics include sustainable development, environmental performance indicators, material flow analysis and decoupling, and inclusive wealth indicators. Students will build their own indicator of well-being and sustainability for a term paper.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laurent, E. (PI)

CEE 274S: Hopkins Microbiology Course (BIO 274S, BIOHOPK 274, ESS 253S)

(Formerly GES 274S.) Four-week, intensive. The interplay between molecular, physiological, ecological, evolutionary, and geochemical processes that constitute, cause, and maintain microbial diversity. How to isolate key microorganisms driving marine biological and geochemical diversity, interpret culture-independent molecular characterization of microbial species, and predict causes and consequences. Laboratory component: what constitutes physiological and metabolic microbial diversity; how evolutionary and ecological processes diversify individual cells into physiologically heterogeneous populations; and the principles of interactions between individuals, their population, and other biological entities in a dynamically changing microbial ecosystem. Prerequisites: CEE 274A and CEE 274B, or equivalents.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 275P: Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs (CEE 175P)

Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stanton, C. (PI)

CEE 275S: Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEE 175S)

Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 276G: Sustainability Design Thinking (CEE 176G)

Application design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 277L: Smart Cities & Communities (CEE 177L)

A city is comprised of people and a complex system of systems. Data provides the connective tissue between those systems. Smart cities use information technology (IT) to harness that data for operational efficiency, efficacy of government services, and sustainability. Key enablers covered include: IoT, open data, analytics, cloud and cognitive computing, and systems of engagement. System case studies will include: water, energy, transportation, buildings, food production, urban design, and social services. The evolving relationship between a city and its citizens as well as the risks / challenges of smart cities will also be explored.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lechner, R. (PI)

CEE 279S: Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 179S, EARTHSYS 179S, ESS 179S)

Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 299E: Graduate Summer Research in CEE

Investigation of a research topic in civil and environmental engineering. For students admitted to the Stanford Summer Session program. Written report or oral presentation required. Students must obtain a faculty or research staff sponsor.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-6 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 370D: Environmental Research

Introductory research experience for first-year Ph.D. students in the Environmental Engineering and Science program. 15-18 hours/week on research over three quarters. 370A requires written literature survey on a research topic; 370B requires oral presentation on experimental techniques and research progress; 370C requires written or oral presentation of preliminary doctoral research proposal. Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 374D: Introduction to Physiology of Microbes in Biofilms

Diversification of biofilm populations, control of gene expression in biofilm environments, and evolution of novel genetic traits in biofilms.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-6 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 374S: Advanced Topics in Microbial Pollution

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 374T: Advanced Topics in Coastal Pollution

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 374U: Advanced Topics in Submarine Groundwater Discharge

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 374V: Advanced Topics in Microbial Source Tracking

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 374W: Advanced Topics in Water, Health and Development

Advanced topics in water, health and development. Emphasis on low-and-middle-income countries. Class content varies according to interests of students. Instructor consent required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Davis, J. (PI)

CEE 374X: Advanced Topics in Multivariate Statistical Analysis

Analysis of experimental and non-experimental data using multivariate modeling approaches. May be repeated for credit. Permission of instructor required for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 377: Research Proposal Writing in Environmental Engineering and Science

For first- and second-year post-master's students preparing for thesis defense. Students develop progress reports and agency-style research proposals, and present a proposal in oral form. Prerequisite: consent of thesis adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 398: Report on Civil Engineering Training

On-the-job training under the guidance of experienced, on-site supervisors; meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. Students submit a concise report detailing work activities, problems worked on, and key results. Prerequisite: qualified offer of employment and consent of adviser as per I-Center procedures.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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