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SOC 20N: What counts as "race," and why? (CSRE 20N)

Preference to freshmen. Seminar discussion of how various institutions in U.S. society employ racial categories, and how race is studied and conceptualized across disciplines. Course introduces perspectives from demography, history, law, genetics, sociology, psychology, and medicine. Students will read original social science research, learn to collect and analyze data from in-depth interviews, and use library resources to conduct legal/archival case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Saperstein, A. (PI)

SOC 31N: Social Networks

This Introductory Seminar reviews the history of social network studies, investigates how networks have changed over the past hundred years and asks how new technologies will impact them. We will draw from scholarly publications, popular culture and personal experience as ways to approach this central aspect of the human experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Granovetter, M. (PI)

SOC 102A: Social Inequality in Israel (CSRE 132A, JEWISHST 132A)

Like the US, Israel is a nation of immigrants. Israel additionally shares with the US vast economic, ethnic/racial and gender gaps, which are shaped and are being shaped by the demographic diversity characterizing its society. The course will provide a comparative framework for analyzing social inequality in Israel. We will start by reviewing essential concepts and theories in the study of social stratification. We will then review the main cleavages characterizing Israeli society, while comparing them to gaps in other advances societies and particularly the US. We will focus on class, gender and ethnicity as the main distinctions and will examine their implications for differences in life chances in several domains across the life course. We will conclude with a discussion of possible scenarios for change, which are relevant to both Israel and the US. Throughout the course, we will study critical thinking techniques and will use them for analyzing issues that are central for the analysis of social inequality in Israel and elsewhere.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levanon, A. (PI)

SOC 109: Race and Immigration in the US : Boundaries and Mobility

Drawing from theories and research in race/ethnicity, social psychology, inequality, and demography, and focusing on the U.S., this course examines how racial hierarchies affect immigrants¿ socioeconomic mobility and ethnic identities, and how immigrants and their descendants contribute to the reconstruction of racial and ethnic boundaries. Topics include: theories of international migration and assimilation; immigration and the labor market; racial and ethnic identities; immigrants and interracial relations; second-generation mobility and identities; transnationalism.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Li, Y. (PI)

SOC 112: Comparative Democratic Development (POLISCI 147)

Social, cultural, political, economic, and international factors affecting the development and consolidation of democracy in historical and comparative perspective. Individual country experiences with democracy, democratization, and regime performance. Emphasis is on global third wave of democratization beginning in the mid-1970s, the recent global recession of democracy (including the rise of illiberal populist parties and movements), and the contemporary challenges and prospects for democratic change.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 120: Interpersonal Relations (SOC 220)

(Graduate students register for 220.) Forming ties, developing norms, status, conformity, deviance, social exchange, power, and coalition formation; important traditions of research have developed from the basic theories of these processes. Emphasis is on understanding basic theories and drawing out their implications for change in a broad range of situations, families, work groups, and friendship groups.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ridgeway, C. (PI)

SOC 126: Introduction to Social Networks (SOC 226)

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lu, Q. (PI); Lunn, A. (PI)

SOC 129X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 136: Sociology of Law (SOC 236)

(Graduate students register for 236) This course explores major issues and debates in the sociology of law. Topics include historical perspectives on the origins of law; rationality and legal sanctions; normative decision making and morality; cognitive decision making; crime and deviance, with particular attention to the problem of mass incarceration; the "law in action" versus the "law on the books;" organizational responses to law, particularly in the context of labor and employment; the roles of lawyers, judges, and juries; and law and social change with particular emphasis on the American civil rights movement. Special Instructions: Students are expected to attend a weekly TA-led discussion section in addition to lecture. Sections will be scheduled after the start of term at times when all students can attend. Paper requirements are flexible. See "Special Instructions" in course description above. Cross-listed with Law 7511. Elements Used in Grading: Class participation, paper proposal, three short papers and a final paper (see syllabus for details).
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dauber, M. (PI)

SOC 146: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Markus, H. (PI); Moya, P. (PI)

SOC 149: The Urban Underclass (CSRE 149A, SOC 249, URBANST 112)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rosenfeld, M. (PI)

SOC 157: Ending Poverty with Technology (PUBLPOL 147)

There are growing worries that new technologies may eliminate work, increase inequality, and create a large dependent class subsisting on transfers. But can technology instead be turned against itself and used to end poverty? This class explores the sources of domestic poverty and then examines how new technologies might be developed to eliminate poverty completely. We first survey existing poverty-reducing products and then attempt to imagine new products that might end poverty by equalizing access to information, reducing transaction costs, or equalizing access to training. In a follow-up class in the spring quarter, students who choose to continue will select the most promising ideas, continue to develop them, and begin the design task within Stanford¿s new Poverty and Technology Lab.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Grusky, D. (PI)

SOC 160: Formal Organizations (SOC 260)

(Graduate students register for 260.) The roles of formal organizations in production processes, market transactions, and social movements; and as sources of income and ladders of mobility. Relationships of modern organizations to environments and internal structures and processes. Concepts, models, and tools for analyzing organizational phenomena in contemporary societies. Sources include the literature and case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zhou, X. (PI)

SOC 168: Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change (PUBLPOL 168, PUBLPOL 268, SOC 268)

We derive analytical tools from the social sciences in studying a variety of organizations given their strategies, and in particular, when their strategies change. Focus is on how to design effective organizations and projects within and across institutional settings. This class is associated with a study trip to India during spring break. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 170: Classics of Modern Social Theory (SOC 270)

(Graduate students register for 270). Preference to Sociology majors. Contributions of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary sociology. Topics: the problem of social order and the nature of social conflict; capitalism and bureaucracy; the relationship between social structure and politics; the social sources of religion and political ideology; and the evolution of modern societies. Examples from contemporary research illustrate the impact of these traditions. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Young, P. (PI)

SOC 180A: Foundations of Social Research (CSRE 180A, SOC 280A)

Formulating a research question, developing hypotheses, probability and non-probability sampling, developing valid and reliable measures, qualitative and quantitative data, choosing research design and data collection methods, challenges of making causal inference, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research. Emphasis is on how social research is done, rather than application of different methods. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology and Urban Studies majors, and Sociology coterms.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pedulla, D. (PI)

SOC 188: One in Five: The Law, Politics, and Policy of Campus Sexual Assault (FEMGEN 143)

TRIGGER WARNING: Over the past three years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a potentially higher proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students) experience sexual assault. People of color, LGBT students, disabled individuals and other vulnerable groups are at increased risk. This is also a significant problem in k12 education. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by what they describe as an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators. These survivors have launched one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. As a result, the federal government under President Obama stepped up its civil rights enforcement in this area, with over 300 colleges and universities under investigation for allegedly mishandling student sexual assault complaints as of July 2017. At the same time, this heightened response has led to a series of high-profile lawsuits by accused students who assert that they were falsely accused or subjected to mishandled investigations that lacked sufficient due process protections. The one thing that survivors and accused students appear to agree on is that colleges are not handling these matters appropriately. Colleges have meanwhile complained of being whipsawed between survivors, accused students, interest groups, and enforcement authorities. The election of President Trump has now created significant uncertainty about how this issue will be handled by the Department of Education going forward. The Trump Administration took the extraordinary step this September of rolling back all of the Obama Administration guidance on this subject. Meanwhile Congress has been unable to pass legislation addressing the issue, though there are several bipartisan bills under consideration. This course focuses on the legal, policy, and political issues surrounding sexual assault on college campuses. We will learn background about sexual violence and the efforts to implement legal protections for survivors in the educational context. We will also study the basic legal frameworks governing campus assault, focusing on the relevant federal laws such as Title IX and the Clery Act. We will hear from guest speakers who are actively involved in shaping policy and advocating in this area, including lawyers, lobbyists, filmmakers, journalists, and policymakers. The subject matter of this course is sensitive and students are expected to treat the material with sensitivity. Much of the reading and subject matter may be upsetting and/or triggering for students who identify as survivors. There is no therapeutic component for this course, although supportive campus resources and Title IX staff are available for those who need them. This course was previously a Sophomore College Class that is now being offered as a regular quarter-length course. Enrollment is by INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION. Access the consent form here feminist.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-program/forms or email rmeisels@stanford.edu to request a form via email. Cross-listed with Law 7065. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignment, Final Paper or Project.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dauber, M. (PI)

SOC 193: Undergraduate Teaching Apprenticeship

Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 194: Computational Undergraduate Research Assistantship

Computational sociology research assistant working with faculty on an on-going technical research project. Applications for position reviewed on a rolling basis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Willer, R. (PI)

SOC 202: Junior Seminar: Preparation for Research (URBANST 202)

Required of all juniors in Urban Studies and those juniors in Sociology planning on writing an honors thesis . Students write a research prospectus and grant proposal, which may be submitted for funding. Research proposal in final assignment may be carried out in Spring or Summer Quarter; consent required for Autumn Quarter research.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McAdam, D. (PI)

SOC 217B: Chinese Politics and Society (SOC 317B)

(Doctoral students register for 317B.) This seminar surveys the major turning points that have shaped China's evolution since 1949. The topics covered include the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, the political and economic turning point of the early 1980s, the political crisis of 1989, the restructuring of the state sector since the 1990s, and the patterns of protest that have accompanied the rapid social changes over the past three decades. We will conclude the course with current debates about China's future.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Walder, A. (PI)

SOC 220: Interpersonal Relations (SOC 120)

(Graduate students register for 220.) Forming ties, developing norms, status, conformity, deviance, social exchange, power, and coalition formation; important traditions of research have developed from the basic theories of these processes. Emphasis is on understanding basic theories and drawing out their implications for change in a broad range of situations, families, work groups, and friendship groups.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ridgeway, C. (PI)

SOC 224B: Relational Sociology (EDUC 312)

Conversations, social relationships and social networks are the core features of social life. In this course we explore how conversations, relationships, and social networks not only have their own unique and independent characteristics, but how they shape one another and come to characterize many of the settings we enter and live in. As such, students will be introduced to theories and research methodologies concerning social interaction, social relationships, and social networks, as well as descriptions of how these research strands interrelate to form a larger relational sociology that can be employed to characterize a variety of social phenomenon. This course is suitable to advanced undergraduates and doctoral students.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McFarland, D. (PI)

SOC 226: Introduction to Social Networks (SOC 126)

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lu, Q. (PI); Lunn, A. (PI)

SOC 229X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 129X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 231: World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives (EDUC 136, EDUC 306D)

Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility, and equality; education, international organizations, and world culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ramirez, F. (PI)

SOC 236: Sociology of Law (SOC 136)

(Graduate students register for 236) This course explores major issues and debates in the sociology of law. Topics include historical perspectives on the origins of law; rationality and legal sanctions; normative decision making and morality; cognitive decision making; crime and deviance, with particular attention to the problem of mass incarceration; the "law in action" versus the "law on the books;" organizational responses to law, particularly in the context of labor and employment; the roles of lawyers, judges, and juries; and law and social change with particular emphasis on the American civil rights movement. Special Instructions: Students are expected to attend a weekly TA-led discussion section in addition to lecture. Sections will be scheduled after the start of term at times when all students can attend. Paper requirements are flexible. See "Special Instructions" in course description above. Cross-listed with Law 7511. Elements Used in Grading: Class participation, paper proposal, three short papers and a final paper (see syllabus for details).
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dauber, M. (PI)

SOC 249: The Urban Underclass (CSRE 149A, SOC 149, URBANST 112)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rosenfeld, M. (PI)

SOC 257: Causal Inference in Quantitative Educational and Social Science Research (EDUC 430B)

This course surveys quantitative methods to make causal inferences in the absence of randomized experiment including the use of natural and quasi-experiments, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity, fixed effects estimators, and difference-in-differences. We emphasize the proper interpretation of these research designs and critical engagement with their key assumptions for applied researchers. Prerequisites: Prior training in multivariate regression (e.g., ECON 102B or the permission of the instructor).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dee, T. (PI)

SOC 260: Formal Organizations (SOC 160)

(Graduate students register for 260.) The roles of formal organizations in production processes, market transactions, and social movements; and as sources of income and ladders of mobility. Relationships of modern organizations to environments and internal structures and processes. Concepts, models, and tools for analyzing organizational phenomena in contemporary societies. Sources include the literature and case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zhou, X. (PI)

SOC 268: Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change (PUBLPOL 168, PUBLPOL 268, SOC 168)

We derive analytical tools from the social sciences in studying a variety of organizations given their strategies, and in particular, when their strategies change. Focus is on how to design effective organizations and projects within and across institutional settings. This class is associated with a study trip to India during spring break. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 270: Classics of Modern Social Theory (SOC 170)

(Graduate students register for 270). Preference to Sociology majors. Contributions of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary sociology. Topics: the problem of social order and the nature of social conflict; capitalism and bureaucracy; the relationship between social structure and politics; the social sources of religion and political ideology; and the evolution of modern societies. Examples from contemporary research illustrate the impact of these traditions. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Young, P. (PI)

SOC 271: Organizational Analysis (EDUC 288)

Principles of organizational behavior and analysis; theories of group and individual behavior; organizational culture; and applications to school organization and design. Case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 280A: Foundations of Social Research (CSRE 180A, SOC 180A)

Formulating a research question, developing hypotheses, probability and non-probability sampling, developing valid and reliable measures, qualitative and quantitative data, choosing research design and data collection methods, challenges of making causal inference, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research. Emphasis is on how social research is done, rather than application of different methods. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology and Urban Studies majors, and Sociology coterms.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pedulla, D. (PI)

SOC 305: Graduate Proseminar

For first-year Sociology doctoral students only, Introduction and orientation to the field of Sociology. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jimenez, T. (PI)

SOC 311A: Workshop: Comparative Studies of Educational and Political Systems (EDUC 387)

Analysis of quantitative and longitudinal data on national educational systems and political structures. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 315W: Workshop: Economic Sociology and Organizations

Theory, methods, and research in the sociology of the economy and of formal organizations, through presentations of ongoing work by students, faculty, and guest speakers, and discussion of recent literature and controversies. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to Sociology doctoral students; others by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 316: Historical and Comparative Sociology

Theory and research on macro-historical changes of sociological significance such as the rise of capitalism, the causes and consequences of revolutions, and the formation of the modern nation state and global world system. Methodological issues in historical and comparative sociology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Shin, G. (PI)

SOC 317B: Chinese Politics and Society (SOC 217B)

(Doctoral students register for 317B.) This seminar surveys the major turning points that have shaped China's evolution since 1949. The topics covered include the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, the political and economic turning point of the early 1980s, the political crisis of 1989, the restructuring of the state sector since the 1990s, and the patterns of protest that have accompanied the rapid social changes over the past three decades. We will conclude the course with current debates about China's future.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Walder, A. (PI)

SOC 318: Social Movements and Collective Action

Topics: causes, dynamics, and outcomes of social movements; organizational dimensions of collective action; and causes and consequences of individual activism.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McAdam, D. (PI)

SOC 320: Foundations of Social Psychology

Major theoretical perspectives, and their assumptions and problems, in interpersonal processes and social psychology. Techniques of investigation and methodological issues. Perspectives: symbolic interaction, social structure and personality, and cognitive and group processes.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 321W: Workshop: Social Psychology and Gender

Advanced graduate student workshop in social psychology. Current theories and research agendas, recent publications, and presentations of ongoing research by faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ridgeway, C. (PI)

SOC 325W: Workshop: Graduate Family

Sociology PhD students will present their own work weekly, and read and critique the research-in-progress of their peers on issues of family, household structure, interpersonal relationships, marriage, demography, survey data, demographic methods, statistical methods, and related fields. May be repeat for credit starting 8/1/2016.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rosenfeld, M. (PI)

SOC 328: The Sociology of Work and Employment

Work and employment have the ability to promote economic security as well as reinforce poverty, provide meaning as well as induce alienation, generate collaboration as well as reproduce difference. Indeed, work and employment are central components of the human experience and structure significant portions of our lives. This course introduces students to current theoretical and empirical issues in sociological scholarship on work and employment. The substantive topics covered in this course will include job search and finding work, the hiring process, changing employment relations, job loss and unemployment, racial and gender stratification at work, unpaid labor and care work, as well as work and family intersections. Theoretical and methodological innovation in recent scholarship will be highlighted throughout the course. The course will culminate with students developing a proposal for a research project designed to address a significant gap in existing scholarship on work and employment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pedulla, D. (PI)

SOC 341W: Workshop: Inequality

Causes, consequences, and structure of inequality; how inequality results from and shapes social classes, occupations, professions, and other aspects of the economy. Research presentations by students, faculty, and guest speakers. Discussion of controversies, theories, and recent writings. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to Sociology doctoral students; others by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 350W: Workshop: Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Nation

Current theories and research, recent publications, and presentations of ongoing research by faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Sociology doctoral student or consent of instructor
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 356: Strategy and Organizations

Why are some organizations more competitive than others?  This is one of the defining questions of the interdisciplinary research field known as strategic management.  In this seminar, we will survey the field of strategic management as seen through the lens of organization theory, touching on the four main theoretical approaches that have developed there.nnnMost work in strategic management pays little attention to particular theoretical perspectives, and is organized more by the topic - the phenomenon being studied - such as market exit, growth, performance, mergers and acquisitions, innovation, and the like.  I have catalogued the research in strategic management both according to theoretical perspective and topic, and that structure is developed in this course.  Our goal is to help you to identify theoretical perspectives as you try to understand the strategy field.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 361: Social Psychology of Organizations

This seminar focuses on social psychological theories and research relevant to organizational behavior. It reviews the current research topics in micro-organizational behavior, linking these to foundations in cognitive and social psychology and sociology. Topics include models of attribution, decision making, emotion, coordination, influence and persuasion, and the psychology of power and culture. Prerequisites: Enrollment in a PhD program. graduate-level social psychology course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Heath, C. (PI)

SOC 361W: Workshop: Networks and Organizations (EDUC 361)

For students doing advanced research. Group comments and criticism on dissertation projects at any phase of completion, including data problems, empirical and theoretical challenges, presentation refinement, and job market presentations. Collaboration, debate, and shaping research ideas. Prerequisite: courses in organizational theory or social network analysis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

SOC 368W: Workshop: China Social Science (POLISCI 448R)

For Ph.D. students in the social sciences and history. Research on contemporary society and politics in the People's Republic of China. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 369: Social Network Methods (EDUC 316)

Introduction to social network theory, methods, and research applications in sociology. Network concepts of interactionist (balance, cohesion, centrality) and structuralist (structural equivalence, roles, duality) traditions are defined and applied to topics in small groups, social movements, organizations, communities. Students apply these techniques to data on schools and classrooms.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 370A: Sociological Theory: Social Structure, Inequality, and Conflict

Restricted to Sociology doctoral students.The traditions of structural analysis derived from the work of Marx, Weber, and related thinkers. Antecedent ideas in foundational works are traced through contemporary theory and research on political conflict, social stratification, formal organization, and the economy. Priority is given to first year Sociology students
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Walder, A. (PI)

SOC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (EDUC 374, POLISCI 334)

Cross-listed with Law (LAW 781), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 375W: Workshop: Morality and Hierarchy

Advanced research workshop with a focus on new theory and research, recent publications, and current research by faculty and graduate student participants. Topics of relevant research include, but are not restricted to, morality, cooperation, solidarity, politics, status, and power. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Willer, R. (PI)

SOC 378: Seminar on Institutional Theory and World Society

Sociological analyses of the rise and impact of the expanded modern world order, with its internationalized organizations and globalized discourse. Consequences for national and local society: education, political organization, economic structure, the environment, and science. The centrality of the individual and the rationalized organization as legitimated actors.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Meyer, J. (PI)

SOC 382: Sociological Methodology II: Principles of Regression Analysis

Preference to Sociology doctoral students. Other students by instructor permission only. Required for Ph.D. in Sociology. Enrollment limited to first-year Sociology doctoral students. Rigorous treatment of linear regression models, model assumptions, and various remedies for when these assumptions are violated. Introduction to panel data analysis. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: 381.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Young, C. (PI)

SOC 385B: Research Practicum II

Workshop on research methods and writing research papers for second year Sociology doctoral students. Ongoing student research, methodological problems, writing challenges, and possible solutions. Required for second year paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Saperstein, A. (PI)

SOC 393: Teaching Apprenticeship

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 396: Sociology Colloquium

The Sociology Colloquium is a semimonthly seminar held throughout the academic year, in which distinguished scholars lecture about their cutting-edge research findings. Sociology Students must enroll or credit and it is required for all first and second year Sociology students. May be repeat for credit start 8/1/2016
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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