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BIOS 242: Writing Compelling Fellowships and Career Development Awards

An overview of principles and fundamentals for writing competitive fellowships (e.g. NIH F31, F32) and career development awards (e.g. NIH K Awards). Topics include: developing specific aims and career development plans; using the review criteria to inform writing; timelines and resources. Participants develop proposals through guided exercises with an emphasis on in-class peer review and focused faculty feedback.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 377: Research Proposal Writing in Environmental Engineering and Science

For first- and second-year post-master's students preparing for thesis defense. Students develop progress reports and agency-style research proposals, and present a proposal in oral form. Prerequisite: consent of thesis adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 208: Media Processes and Effects (COMM 108)

(Graduate students register for COMM 208.) The process of communication theory construction including a survey of social science paradigms and major theories of communication. Recommended: 1 or PSYCH 1.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Environmental and Food System Journalism (COMM 177C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Advanced reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of food journalism. This course begins with the assumption that students are familiar with the basics of reporting and research in journalism. We'll take those skills and apply them to the wide territory of food journalism, from farmer's markets to food waste, from travel and cultural writing to stories about agriculture and climate change. We will read a range of the best food journalism and students will be charged with writing both long form narrative essays and short magazine style pieces. We'll talk about how to hone in on the truly interesting idea, how to get more out of the reporting process and how to turn the raw materials of research and interviews into polished, engaging prose. Admission by application only, available from vvc1@stanford.edu. Deadline December 4.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DESINST 270: Visual Design Fundamentals

Introduction to the principles, tools, and techniques of visual design and visual communication. Students learn the fundamentals of line, shape, color, composition, and type and use these basic building blocks to communicate with clarity, emotion, and meaning. Four successive design projects introduce new principles and techniques each week. Projects focus on the digital realm of mobile phones, tablets, websites, and other screen-based interfaces. Students get hands-on experience with both vector and bitmap software packages. No prior experience required. Accepting 24 students. Graduate and undergraduate students encouraged to apply. Attendance at all sessions is mandatory. Application required, see dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Baggeroer, D. (PI)

EARTHSYS 177C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Environmental and Food System Journalism (COMM 177C, COMM 277C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Advanced reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of food journalism. This course begins with the assumption that students are familiar with the basics of reporting and research in journalism. We'll take those skills and apply them to the wide territory of food journalism, from farmer's markets to food waste, from travel and cultural writing to stories about agriculture and climate change. We will read a range of the best food journalism and students will be charged with writing both long form narrative essays and short magazine style pieces. We'll talk about how to hone in on the truly interesting idea, how to get more out of the reporting process and how to turn the raw materials of research and interviews into polished, engaging prose. Admission by application only, available from vvc1@stanford.edu. Deadline December 4.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Environmental and Food System Journalism (COMM 177C, COMM 277C, EARTHSYS 177C)

Advanced reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of food journalism. This course begins with the assumption that students are familiar with the basics of reporting and research in journalism. We'll take those skills and apply them to the wide territory of food journalism, from farmer's markets to food waste, from travel and cultural writing to stories about agriculture and climate change. We will read a range of the best food journalism and students will be charged with writing both long form narrative essays and short magazine style pieces. We'll talk about how to hone in on the truly interesting idea, how to get more out of the reporting process and how to turn the raw materials of research and interviews into polished, engaging prose. Admission by application only, available from vvc1@stanford.edu. Deadline December 4.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 291: Concepts in Environmental Communication (EARTHSYS 191)

Introduction to the history, development, and current state of communication of environmental science and policy to non-specialist audiences. Includes fundamental principles, core competencies, and major challenges of effective environmental communication in the public and policy realms and an overview of the current scope of research and practice in environmental communication. Intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, with a background in environmental science and/or policy studies. Prerequisite: Earth Systems core (EarthSys 111 and EarthSys 112) or equivalent. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 292: Multimedia Environmental Communication

Introductory theory and practice of effective, accurate and engaging use of photography and web video production in communicating environmental science and policy concepts to the public. Emphasis on fundamental technique and process more than gear. Includes group project work, instructor and peer critiquing of work, and substantial out-of-class project work. Limited class size, preference to Earth Systems Master's students. No previous photography or video experience necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EFSLANG 683P: Workshop in Pronunciation for International Students

(1-2 units). Provides support in the development of clear, comprehensible English pronunciation. Includes attention to individual sounds as well as stress, rhythm, and intonation. Students taking the course for 3 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Broeder, M. (PI)

EFSLANG 683R: Workshop in Reading and Vocabulary for International Students

(1-2 units). Provides support in the development of English reading skills for academic purposes, including work on comprehension, speed, and critical interpretation, along with strategies for improving vocabulary. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; QUIJANO, L. (PI)

EFSLANG 683S: Workshop in Oral Communication for International Students

(1-2 units) Provides support in the development of listening and speaking skills in English, including academic listening, small group discussion, oral presentation, and intercultural communication. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Broeder, M. (PI)

EFSLANG 683W: Workshop in Written Communication for International Students

(1-2 units). Provides support in the development of English writing skills for non-natives. Writing assignments are negotiated with the instructor and may include practice in composition, SAT or TOEFL writing, and writing university application essays and statements of purpose. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; QUIJANO, L. (PI)

EFSLANG 688: Intensive English and Academic Orientation for Foreign Graduate Students

Goal is to prepare incoming international graduate students for full-time study. Academic orientation and instruction in academic writing, listening, discussion, oral presentation, and spoken usage. Enrollment limited to 14. Course may be repeated once.
Terms: Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rylance, C. (SI)

EFSLANG 688A: Intensive Spoken English

For current graduate students. Includes work on listening, oral presentation, discussion, and conversational interaction. May fulfill any two of the following EFS requirements, subject to approval by the EFS Director: EFSLANG 690A, 690B, 691, 693B.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rylance, C. (PI)

EFSLANG 688B: Intensive Academic Writing

For current graduate students. Focus on academic writing, with some work in reading and vocabulary development. Engineering, science, humanities, and social science students prepare a research paper; business students write one or more case studies. Fulfills requirement for EFSLANG 697 or 698A, subject to approval by the EFSLANG Director.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rylance, C. (PI)

EFSLANG 689B: Building Communication Skills through Improvisation

Focus on building a range of English communication skills through improvisation activities. Participants explore theatrical techniques that teach collaboration, spontaneity, team building, storytelling, and confident public speaking with connections to academic, professional, and personal situations. Course is co-taught by an improvisation expert and an ESL instructor. No previous improvisation or theater experience necessary.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rylance, C. (PI)

EFSLANG 689P: Pronunciation

The sounds of English, and stress, intonation, and rhythm patterns important to natural-sounding speech. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, D. (PI)

EFSLANG 689V: Vocabulary and Idiom

Building vocabulary for academic success. Idiomatic language, and what idioms and metaphors reflect about American culture. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 690A: Interacting in English

Strategies for communicating effectively in social and academic settings. Informal and formal language used in campus settings, including starting and maintaining conversations, asking questions, making complaints, and contributing ideas and opinions. Simulations and discussions, with feedback on pronunciation, grammar, and usage. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 690B: Academic Discussion

Skills for effective participation in classroom settings, seminars, and research group meetings. Pronunciation, grammar, and appropriateness for specific tasks. Feedback on language and communication style. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 690A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 690C: Advanced Interacting in English

Communication skills for extended discourse such as storytelling and presenting supported arguments. Development of interactive listening facility and overall intelligibility and accuracy. Goal is advanced fluency in classroom, professional and social settings. Identification of and attention to individual patterned errors. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 690B or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Streichler, S. (PI)

EFSLANG 691: Oral Presentation

For advanced graduate students. Practice in academic presentation skills; strategy, design, organization, and use of visual aids. Focus is on improving fluency and delivery style, with videotaping for feedback on language accuracy and usage. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 691S: Oral Presentation

For advanced graduate students. Practice in academic presentation skills; strategy, design, organization, and use of visual aids. Focus is on improving fluency and delivery style, with video recording for feedback on language accuracy and usage. Fulfills the requirement for EFSLANG 691.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Streichler, S. (PI)

EFSLANG 692: Speaking and Teaching in English

For non-native speakers who must teach in English. Focus is on developing clarity, intelligibility, and effectiveness through weekly presentations simulating actual teaching assistant responsibilities. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 693A: Listening Comprehension

Strategies for effective listening in an academic setting, focusing on identifying key ideas in lectures. Practice in understanding words and phrases commonly encountered in classroom settings. Computer-based exercises for comprehension of rapid, natural speech. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 693B: Advanced Listening Comprehension, and Vocabulary Development

Listening strategies and vocabulary for understanding English in academic and non-academic contexts. Discussion and interpretation of communicative intent. Computer-based and video exercises across a range of genres; individual project. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 693A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 694: English for Business, Industry and Professional Life

For advanced graduate students. Task-based practice of language appropriate for professional settings in industry and related teamwork. Simulation of the roles of manager, applicant, subordinate, and coworker. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 693A, or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rylance, C. (PI)

EFSLANG 695A: Pronunciation and Intonation

Recognition and practice of American English sounds, stress, and intonation patterns for greater comprehension and intelligibility. Analysis of problem areas. Biweekly tape assignments and tutorials. May be repeated once for credit. Enrollment limted to 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mawson, C. (PI); Wang, D. (PI)

EFSLANG 695B: Advanced Pronunciation and Intonation

Continuation of EFSLANG 695A, focusing on American English sounds, stress, rhythm, and intonation patterns. Emphasis is on self-monitoring, integrated with short presentations. Biweekly tape assignments and tutorials. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated for credit three times. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 695A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mawson, C. (PI)

EFSLANG 695S: Pronunciation and Intonation

Recognition and practice of American English sounds, stress, and intonation patterns for greater comprehension and intelligibility. Analysis of problem areas. Biweekly tape assignments and tutorials. Fulfills the requirement for EFSLANG 695A.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, D. (PI)

EFSLANG 697: Gateway to Graduate Writing

Focus is on improving grammatical accuracy and vocabulary, building fluency, and learning the structure and conventions of English correspondence, reports, and short academic papers. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Geda, K. (PI)

EFSLANG 698A: Writing Academic English

Strategies and conventions for graduate writing. Emphasis is on fluency, organization, documentation, and appropriateness for writing tasks required in course work. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 698B: Advanced Graduate Writing

Focus on clarity, accuracy, and appropriate style. For graduate students experienced in English writing and currently required to write for courses and research. Class meetings and individual conferences. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 698A. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 698C: Writing and Presenting Research

For advanced graduate students completing major research projects. Revising and editing strategies for preparing papers, conference abstracts, and poster presentations. Practice adapting written and oral presentational content and style to different audiences. Students present their research and receive instructor and peer feedback, with regular individual tutorials in addition to class work. Enrollment limited to 12. May be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Students required by the EFS Placement Exam to take EFSLANG 691, 697, 698A, or 698B may not enroll in 698C until those requirements have been fulfilled. Others may sign up directly.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hubbard, P. (PI)

EFSLANG 698S: Writing Academic English

Strategies and conventions for graduate writing. Emphasis is on fluency, organization, documentation, and appropriateness for writing tasks required in course work and in producing research papers. Fulfills the requirement for EFSLANG 698A.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Streichler, S. (PI)

ENGR 103: Public Speaking (ENGR 203)

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 202S: Directed Writing Projects

Individualized writing instruction for students working on writing projects such as dissertations, proposals, grant applications, honors or engineering theses, journal articles, conference papers, and teaching and research statements. Weekly one-on-one conferences with writing instructors from the Technical Communication Program. Students receive close attention to and detailed feedback on their writing. No prerequisite. Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit. This course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; McDevitt, M. (PI)

ENGR 202W: Technical Writing

How to write clear, concise, and well-ordered technical prose. Principles of editing for structure and style. Applications to a variety of genres in engineering and science.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Harrison, K. (PI)

ENGR 281: d.media - Designing Media that Matters

The combination of always-on smartphones, instant access to information and global social sharing is changing behavior and shifting cultural norms. How can we design digital experiences that make this change positive? Join the d.media team and find out! This course is project-based and hands-on. Three projects will explore visual design, interaction design and behavioral design all in the context of today's technology landscape and in service of a socially positive user experience. See http://dmedia.stanford.edu, Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 311D: Portfolio to Professional: Supporting the Development of Digital Presence Through ePortfolios

This course guides graduate students in creating a professional ePortfolio and establishing an online presence. The course includes seminar-style presentations and discussions, opportunities for feedback with career mentors, classmates, alumni, employers, and other community members using think-aloud protocols and peer review approaches. Curriculum modules focus on strategies for telling your story in the digital environment, platform considerations, evidence and architecture, visual design and user experience. Open to all graduate students and majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chen, H. (PI); Patel, S. (PI)

GEOPHYS 205: Effective Scientific Presentation and Public Speaking

The ability to present your work in a compelling, concise, and engaging manner will enhance your professional career. This course breaks down presentations into their key elements: the opening, body of the talk, closing, slide and poster graphics, Q&A, pacing, pauses, and voice modulation. The class is a series of several minute log stand-and-deliver exercises in which you get immediate class feedback and then re-do it on the fly. In addition, each participant will use their upcoming conference talk or poster (e.g., AGU, SEG), or upcoming job talk or funding pitch, as a final project. In addition to the class sessions, I will spend 60-90 min with each student individually. Everyone will come away a more skilled and confident speaker than they were before. Instructor: Ross S. Stein (Temblor.net, Emeritus USGS). The course syllabus can be found at http://temblor.net/team/ross-stein/
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stein, R. (PI)

GSBGEN 515: Essentials of Strategic Communication

Successful leaders understand the power of authentic, memorable communication.nnThis course uses the lens of oral communication and presentations, to introduce the essential elements of the strategic communication strategies that make authentic, memorable communication work.nnFocusing on oral communication and presentation, we introduce the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, message construction, communicator credibility, and delivery.nnDeliverables include written documents, focusing on individual and team presentations, with students receiving continuous feedback to improve their communication effectiveness, and to sharpen their authentic leadership voice.n nThis highly interactive, practical course, is focused on feedback to help students at all levels of communication mastery develop confidence in their speaking and writing. Course includes presentations, assignments, lectures, discussions, simulated activities, in-class feedback, and filmed feedback.n nIn this course you will learn to:n-Recognize strategically effective communicationn-Implement the principles of strategic communication across different platformsn-Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documentsn-Diagnose and expand, your personal authentic communication stylennAs you make your super round selection, keep in mind that wait lists have been long for this course.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 565: Political Communication: How Leaders Become Leaders

Politics, perhaps like no other arena, provides a rich and dramatic laboratory for studying the art and science of influential communication. Whether it is a local school bond election or a Congressional race, a Presidential debate or a State of the Union Address, the demanding communications of politics provide insights into our own strengths and gaps as a communicator and leader. Political campaigns, by their very nature, are highly visible, oriented toward very specific objectives, and increasingly leverage a variety of new media platforms. They are often emotionally charged, and rife with conflict and drama. The principles of political communications transcend politics, and are useful guides for leaders in business, the non-profit community, as well as government. How candidates, elected officials, and leaders in all kinds of organizations communicate vision, values, and experience, as well as how they perform in very fluid environments, not the least of which may be during a crisis, has a great deal to do with their career success. nnIn its ninth year, this highly interactive course allows students to explore both theory and practice behind effective positioning and presentation. Last year was a presidential election year in the United States, and was an extraordinary event in many respects. Students will analyze and evaluate both successful and unsuccessful communications strategies of political campaigns and candidates. They will explore historic examples of US Presidential debates, from Nixon/Kennedy to the present. Further they will experience political events as they happen -- like last year's campaigns -- with each class drawing lessons from political developments around the nation and the world. Students will also hone their own strategic communications skills in activities requiring both written and spoken communication. This is not a course in political science, American government, or in public speaking. However, the engaged student will gain insights into those areas as well.nnThe course is taught by David Demarest, Vice President of Public Affairs for Stanford University. Demarest has broad communications experience across the public and private sector in financial services, education, and government. After serving as Assistant U.S. Trade Representative, and Assistant Secretary of Labor in the Reagan Administration, in 1988 he served as Communications Director for Vice President George H. W. Bush's successful presidential campaign. He then became a member of the White House senior staff as White House Communications Director. After leaving government in 1993, he spent the next decade leading communications for two Fortune 50 companies, before coming to Stanford in 2005.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

HRP 214: Scientific Writing

Step-by-step through the process of writing and publishing a scientific manuscript. How to write effectively, concisely, and clearly in preparation of an actual scientific manuscript. Students are encouraged to bring a manuscript on which they are currently working to develop and polish throughout the course. Please note 3-units students will additionally write and revise a manuscript.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sainani, K. (PI)

HRP 271: Preparation and Practice: Scientific Communication and Media

Through tailored lecture, case study, and a practical final project, academic and professional leaders will help you gain insight into the science communications and media industry and the skills necessary to succeed within the various positions and levels available within it.nnAnticipated Learning Outcomes ¿nTo assist interdisciplinary graduate students, medical students, residents and fellows in all levels of training to develop and hone the communication skills necessary for post-training and internship success in a science communications/media field;nTo provide an understanding of the scope of career opportunities within the science communications sector, focusing on the development, organization, and management issues specific to it;nTo provide a forum for interacting with alumni, faculty, and other practitioners from a variety of fields and organizations who may assist candidates with defining and meeting their own professional goals;nTo increase awareness of industry terminology and theories, combined with hands-on experience with techniques and methodologies most useful for credential development on the job market;nTo develop and hone expertise in the areas of: publishing, editing, workflow, ethics, trends, principles of effective scholarly/news writing, interviewing techniques, and media/website management.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Eberle, S. (PI)

INDE 234: Introduction to Writing Research Proposals

Practical instruction in research proposal writing. Suitable for advanced graduate students. Substantial writing component. Enrollment by instructor approval only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 236: Tales to Design Cars By

Students learn to tell personal narratives and prototype connections between popular and historic media using the automobile. Explores the meaning and impact of personal and preserved car histories. Storytelling techniques serve to make sense of car experiences through engineering design principles and social learning, Replay memories, examine engagement and understand user interviews, to design for the mobility experience of the future. This course celebrates car fascination, and leads the student through finding and telling a car story through the REVS photographic archives, ethnographic research, interviews, and diverse individual and collaborative narrative methods-verbal, non-verbal, and film. Methods draw from socio-cognitive psychology design thinking, and fine art; applied to car storytelling. Course culminates in a final story presentation and showcase. Restricted to co-term and graduate students. Class Size limited to 18.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 378: Tell, Make, Engage: Action Stories for Entrepreneuring

Individual storytelling action and reflective observations gives the course an evolving framework of evaluative methods, from engineering design; socio cognitive psychology; and art that are formed and reformed by collaborative development within the class. Stories attached to an idea, a discovery or starting up something new, are considered through iterative narrative work, and small group challenges. This course will use qualitative and quantitative methods for story engagement, assessment, and class determined research projects with practice exercises, artifacts, short papers and presentations. Graduate and Co-Term students from all programs welcome.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Karanian, B. (PI)

ORALCOMM 215: Voice Workshop (ORALCOMM 115)

Focus is on breath, voice production, expansion of vocal range and stamina, and clarity of articulation. Geared toward public speaking including presentations, lectures, and job talks. May be taken in conjunction with ORALCOMM 117. ORALCOMM 115/215 was previously listed as CTL 115/215.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Freeland, T. (PI)

ORALCOMM 217: The Art of Effective Speaking (ORALCOMM 117)

The principles and practice of effective oral communication. Through formal and informal speaking activities, students develop skills framing and articulating ideas through speech. Strategies for speaking extemporaneously, preparing and delivering multimedia presentations, formulating persuasive arguments, refining critical clarity of thought, and enhancing general facility and confidence in oral self-expression. ORALCOMM 117/217 was previously listed as CTL 117/217.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Freeland, T. (PI)

ORALCOMM 219: Oral Communication for Graduate Students

(Formerly CTL 219.) Graduate student speaking activities such as teaching (delivering lectures, guiding discussion, and facilitating small groups), professional presentations and conference papers, and preparing for oral exams and defenses. In-class projects, discussion, and individual evaluation assist students in developing effective techniques for improving oral communication skills.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Allen, D. (PI)

PUBLPOL 306: Writing and Rhetoric for Policy Audiences

This course offers hands-on learning of effective writing and presentation techniques for audiences that include policy makers, decision stakeholders, interest groups, the media, and the public. Class time will be spent learning lessons in rhetoric, analyzing multiple written genres (memo, op-ed, report, media communications), participating in peer review, and practicing presentation strategies (elevator pitch, press conference, media interview, board meeting, formal presentation). Course texts include sample memos, op-eds, and white papers, as well as rhetoric handouts and videos. Students will draft, revise, and submit writing for policy audiences in the compilation of a final portfolio. Students will also produce oral and multimedia arguments, individually and in teams. Students will be responsible for timely peer review and short presentations on course materials. Enrollment limited. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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